32

Anyone knows if is possible to have partial class definition on C++ ?

Something like:

file1.h:

  
class Test {
    public:
        int test1();
};

file2.h:

class Test {
    public:
        int test2();
};

For me it seems quite useful for definining multi-platform classes that have common functions between them that are platform-independent because inheritance is a cost to pay that is non-useful for multi-platform classes.

I mean you will never have two multi-platform specialization instances at runtime, only at compile time. Inheritance could be useful to fulfill your public interface needs but after that it won't add anything useful at runtime, just costs.

Also you will have to use an ugly #ifdef to use the class because you can't make an instance from an abstract class:

class genericTest {
    public:
        int genericMethod();
};

Then let's say for win32:

class win32Test: public genericTest {
    public:
        int win32Method();
};

And maybe:

class macTest: public genericTest {
    public:
        int macMethod();
};

Let's think that both win32Method() and macMethod() calls genericMethod(), and you will have to use the class like this:

 #ifdef _WIN32
 genericTest *test = new win32Test();
 #elif MAC
 genericTest *test = new macTest();
 #endif

 test->genericMethod();

Now thinking a while the inheritance was only useful for giving them both a genericMethod() that is dependent on the platform-specific one, but you have the cost of calling two constructors because of that. Also you have ugly #ifdef scattered around the code.

That's why I was looking for partial classes. I could at compile-time define the specific platform dependent partial end, of course that on this silly example I still need an ugly #ifdef inside genericMethod() but there is another ways to avoid that.

  • First, non-virtual functions don't incur "costs" and second, if your code doesn't indicate which version of the interface you're using, working on one version will break the other version, e.g. when you do test->win32Method(). Platform specific classes are not the same and deserve diferent names. – Jamie Sep 28 '08 at 22:03
  • And you can use a factory method to minimize #ifdefs. And you can use templates (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Curiously_Recurring_Template_Pattern) to further reduce it. – Jamie Sep 28 '08 at 22:06
  • C++ is so old and poor language (( – user2440074 Sep 15 '15 at 7:18

18 Answers 18

35

This is not possible in C++, it will give you an error about redefining already-defined classes. If you'd like to share behavior, consider inheritance.

17

Try inheritance

Specifically

class AllPlatforms {
public:
    int common();
};

and then

class PlatformA : public AllPlatforms {
public:
    int specific();
};
13

You can't partially define classes in C++.

Here's a way to get the "polymorphism, where there's only one subclass" effect you're after without overhead and with a bare minimum of #define or code duplication. It's called simulated dynamic binding:

template <typename T>
class genericTest {
public:
    void genericMethod() {
        // do some generic things
        std::cout << "Could be any platform, I dunno" << std::endl;
        // base class can call a method in the child with static_cast
        (static_cast<T*>(this))->doClassDependentThing();
    }
};

#ifdef _WIN32
    typedef Win32Test Test;
#elif MAC
    typedef MacTest Test;
#endif

Then off in some other headers you'll have:

class Win32Test : public genericTest<Win32Test> {
public:
    void win32Method() {
        // windows-specific stuff:
        std::cout << "I'm in windows" << std::endl;
        // we can call a method in the base class
        genericMethod();
        // more windows-specific stuff...
    }
    void doClassDependentThing() {
        std::cout << "Yep, definitely in windows" << std::endl;
    }
};

and

class MacTest : public genericTest<MacTest> {
public:
    void macMethod() {
        // mac-specific stuff:
        std::cout << "I'm in MacOS" << std::endl;
        // we can call a method in the base class
        genericMethod();
        // more mac-specific stuff...
    }
    void doClassDependentThing() {
        std::cout << "Yep, definitely in MacOS" << std::endl;
    }
};

This gives you proper polymorphism at compile time. genericTest can non-virtually call doClassDependentThing in a way that gives it the platform version, (almost like a virtual method), and when win32Method calls genericMethod it of course gets the base class version.

This creates no overhead associated with virtual calls - you get the same performance as if you'd typed out two big classes with no shared code. It may create a non-virtual call overhead at con(de)struction, but if the con(de)structor for genericTest is inlined you should be fine, and that overhead is in any case no worse than having a genericInit method that's called by both platforms.

Client code just creates instances of Test, and can call methods on them which are either in genericTest or in the correct version for the platform. To help with type safety in code which doesn't care about the platform and doesn't want to accidentally make use of platform-specific calls, you could additionally do:

#ifdef _WIN32
    typedef genericTest<Win32Test> BaseTest;
#elif MAC
    typedef genericTest<MacTest> BaseTest;
#endif

You have to be a bit careful using BaseTest, but not much more so than is always the case with base classes in C++. For instance, don't slice it with an ill-judged pass-by-value. And don't instantiate it directly, because if you do and call a method that ends up attempting a "fake virtual" call, you're in trouble. The latter can be enforced by ensuring that all of genericTest's constructors are protected.

  • I think you got the same line of thought, I liked it. – Edwin Jarvis Sep 30 '08 at 0:05
  • You should be able to find more tips and tricks by searching on "simulated dynamic binding" or maybe "static polymorphism". I'm not sure I've ever seriously used it, since in practice it's quite rare for the overhead of virtual calls to actually matter. If it ever does, though, I'll be ready :-) – Steve Jessop Sep 30 '08 at 11:46
8

or you could try PIMPL

common header file:

class Test
{
public:
    ...
    void common();
    ...
private:
    class TestImpl;
    TestImpl* m_customImpl;
};

Then create the cpp files doing the custom implementations that are platform specific.

  • You need a pointer to TestImpl, not an instance! – coppro Sep 26 '08 at 18:26
  • whoops thanks for the catch – PiNoYBoY82 Sep 26 '08 at 18:31
  • 5
    FTW, PIMPL stands for "pointer to implementation" idiom. – Steve Fallows Sep 26 '08 at 19:14
8
#include will work as that is preprocessor stuff.

class Foo
{
#include "FooFile_Private.h"
}

////////

FooFile_Private.h:

private:
  void DoSg();
  • Crazy good idea, i like that :) – Thomas Haller Oct 18 '17 at 8:05
3

For me it seems quite useful for definining multi-platform classes that have common functions between them that are platform-independent.

Except developers have been doing this for decades without this 'feature'.

I believe partial was created because Microsoft has had, for decades also, a bad habit of generating code and handing it off to developers to develop and maintain.

Generated code is often a maintenance nightmare. What habits to that entire MFC generated framework when you need to bump your MFC version? Or how do you port all that code in *.designer.cs files when you upgrade Visual Studio?

Most other platforms rely more heavily on generating configuration files instead that the user/developer can modify. Those, having a more limited vocabulary and not prone to be mixed with unrelated code. The configuration files can even be inserted in the binary as a resource file if deemed necessary.

I have never seen 'partial' used in a place where inheritance or a configuration resource file wouldn't have done a better job.

  • What if you have a template interface class from which you inherit CRTP-fashion, which is also talked to by another template class with the same specializations, and classes derived from the interface and using the pImpl idiom have identical implementations for all public functions, but must have different platform-specific implementations for all private functions? Partial classes would be cleaner here than including separate Impl files above the public interface implementation based on a #ifdef switch. – orfdorf Jan 12 '15 at 0:57
3

How about this:

class WindowsFuncs { public: int f(); int winf(); };
class MacFuncs { public: int f(); int macf(); }

class Funcs
#ifdef Windows 
    : public WindowsFuncs
#else
    : public MacFuncs
#endif
{
public:
    Funcs();
    int g();
};

Now Funcs is a class known at compile-time, so no overheads are caused by abstract base classes or whatever.

2

Either use inheritance, as Jamie said, or #ifdef to make different parts compile on different platforms.

2

Dirty but practical way is using #include preprocessor:

Test.h:

#ifndef TEST_H
#define TEST_H

class Test
{
public:
    Test(void);
    virtual ~Test(void);

#include "Test_Partial_Win32.h"
#include "Test_Partial_OSX.h"

};

#endif // !TEST_H

Test_Partial_OSX.h:

// This file should be included in Test.h only.

#ifdef MAC
    public:
        int macMethod();
#endif // MAC

Test_Partial_WIN32.h:

// This file should be included in Test.h only.

#ifdef _WIN32
    public:
        int win32Method();
#endif // _WIN32

Test.cpp:

// Implement common member function of class Test in this file.

#include "stdafx.h"
#include "Test.h"

Test::Test(void)
{
}

Test::~Test(void)
{
}

Test_Partial_OSX.cpp:

// Implement OSX platform specific function of class Test in this file.

#include "stdafx.h"
#include "Test.h"

#ifdef MAC
int Test::macMethod()
{
    return 0;
}
#endif // MAC

Test_Partial_WIN32.cpp:

// Implement WIN32 platform specific function of class Test in this file.

#include "stdafx.h"
#include "Test.h"

#ifdef _WIN32
int Test::win32Method()
{
    return 0;
}
#endif // _WIN32
1

Nope.

But, you may want to look up a technique called "Policy Classes". Basically, you make micro-classes (that aren't useful on their own) then glue them together at some later point.

1

Since headers are just textually inserted, one of them could omit the "class Test {" and "}" and be #included in the middle of the other.

I've actually seen this in production code, albeit Delphi not C++. It particularly annoyed me because it broke the IDE's code navigation features.

  • This is very misguided, very misguided, but a valid solution I think :-) – kervin Sep 26 '08 at 18:05
1

This is not possible in C++, it will give you an error about redefining already-defined classes. If you'd like to share behavior, consider inheritance.

I do agree on this. Partial classes is strange construct that makes it very difficult to maintain afterwards. It is difficult to locate on which partial class each member is declared and redefinition or even reimplementation of features are hard to avoid.

Do you want to extend the std::vector, you have to inherit from it. This is because of several reasons. First of all you change the responsibility of the class and (properly?) its class invariants. Secondly, from a security point of view this should be avoided. Consider a class that handles user authentication...

partial class UserAuthentication {
  private string user;
  private string password;
  public bool signon(string usr, string pwd);
}

partial class UserAuthentication {
  private string getPassword() { return password; }
}

A lot of other reasons could be mentioned...

0

As written, it is not possible.

You may want to look into namespaces. You can add a function to a namespace in another file. The problem with a class is that each .cpp needs to see the full layout of the class.

0

Declaring a class body twice will likely generate a type redefinition error. If you're looking for a work around. I'd suggest #ifdef'ing, or using an Abstract Base Class to hide platform specific details.

0

You can get something like partial classes using template specialization and partial specialization. Before you invest too much time, check your compiler's support for these. Older compilers like MSC++ 6.0 didn't support partial specialization.

0

Partial classes are good if you want to extend classes without touching original files. For example I want to extend std's vector template class with helpers. Why the hell I have to create inherited class like vectorEx and not just add methods through partial ?

  • If you could extend it directly, you could access vector's private members which makes your code dependent on its implementation. A more technical reason is that the class could be compiled separately and would break if you changed its structure. – Matthew Crumley Nov 11 '08 at 16:48
0

Let platform independent and platform dependent classes/functions be each-others friend classes/functions. :)

And their separate name identifiers permit finer control over instantiation, so coupling is looser. Partial breaks encapsulation foundation of OO far too absolutely, whereas the requisite friend declarations barely relax it just enough to facilitate multi-paradigm Separation of Concerns like Platform Specific aspects from Domain-Specific platform independent ones.

0

I've been doing something similar in my rendering engine. I have a templated IResource interface class from which a variety of resources inherit (stripped down for brevity):

template <typename TResource, typename TParams, typename TKey>
class IResource
{
public:
    virtual TKey GetKey() const = 0;
protected:
    static shared_ptr<TResource> Create(const TParams& params)
    {
        return ResourceManager::GetInstance().Load(params);
    }
    virtual Status Initialize(const TParams& params, const TKey key, shared_ptr<Viewer> pViewer) = 0;
};

The Create static function calls back to a templated ResourceManager class that is responsible for loading, unloading, and storing instances of the type of resource it manages with unique keys, ensuring duplicate calls are simply retrieved from the store, rather than reloaded as separate resources.

template <typename TResource, typename TParams, typename TKey>
class TResourceManager
{
    sptr<TResource> Load(const TParams& params) { ... }
};

Concrete resource classes inherit from IResource utilizing the CRTP. ResourceManagers specialized to each resource type are declared as friends to those classes, so that the ResourceManager's Load function can call the concrete resource's Initialize function. One such resource is a texture class, which further uses a pImpl idiom to hide its privates:

class Texture2D : public IResource<Texture2D , Params::Texture2D , Key::Texture2D >
{
    typedef TResourceManager<Texture2D , Params::Texture2D , Key::Texture2D > ResourceManager;
    friend class ResourceManager;

public:
    virtual Key::Texture2D GetKey() const override final;
    void GetWidth() const;
private:
    virtual Status Initialize(const Params::Texture2D & params, const Key::Texture2D key, shared_ptr<Texture2D > pTexture) override final;

    struct Impl;
    unique_ptr<Impl> m;
};

Much of the implementation of our texture class is platform-independent (such as the GetWidth function if it just returns an int stored in the Impl). However, depending on what graphics API we're targeting (e.g. Direct3D11 vs. OpenGL 4.3), some of the implementation details may differ. One solution could be to inherit from IResource an intermediary Texture2D class that defines the extended public interface for all textures, and then inherit a D3DTexture2D and OGLTexture2D class from that. The first problem with this solution is that it requires users of your API to be constantly mindful of which graphics API they're targeting (they could call Create on both child classes). This could be resolved by restricting the Create to the intermediary Texture2D class, which uses maybe a #ifdef switch to create either a D3D or an OGL child object. But then there is still the second problem with this solution, which is that the platform-independent code would be duplicated across both children, causing extra maintenance efforts. You could attempt to solve this problem by moving the platform-independent code into the intermediary class, but what happens if some of the member data is used by both platform-specific and platform-independent code? The D3D/OGL children won't be able to access those data members in the intermediary's Impl, so you'd have to move them out of the Impl and into the header, along with any dependencies they carry, exposing anyone who includes your header to all that crap they don't need to know about.

API's should be easy to use right and hard to use wrong. Part of being easy to use right is restricting the user's exposure to only the parts of the API they should be using. This solution opens it up to be easily used wrong and adds maintenance overhead. Users should only have to care about the graphics API they're targeting in one spot, not everywhere they use your API, and they shouldn't be exposed to your internal dependencies. This situation screams for partial classes, but they are not available in C++. So instead, you might simply define the Impl structure in separate header files, one for D3D, and one for OGL, and put an #ifdef switch at the top of the Texture2D.cpp file, and define the rest of the public interface universally. This way, the public interface has access to the private data it needs, the only duplicate code is data member declarations (construction can still be done in the Texture2D constructor that creates the Impl), your private dependencies stay private, and users don't have to care about anything except using the limited set of calls in the exposed API surface:

// D3DTexture2DImpl.h
#include "Texture2D.h"
struct Texture2D::Impl
{
    /* insert D3D-specific stuff here */
};

// OGLTexture2DImpl.h
#include "Texture2D.h"
struct  Texture2D::Impl
{
    /* insert OGL-specific stuff here */
};

// Texture2D.cpp
#include "Texture2D.h"

#ifdef USING_D3D
#include "D3DTexture2DImpl.h"
#else
#include "OGLTexture2DImpl.h"
#endif

Key::Texture2D Texture2D::GetKey() const
{
    return m->key;
}
// etc...

Your Answer

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.