5

Considering I'm building a form and posting the data to PHP, a typical insert query for me goes like this:

$sql = "INSERT INTO news
            (title, body) 
            VALUES (?, ?)";
$stmt = $db->prepare($sql);
$stmt->execute(array($_POST["title"], $_POST["body"]));
$stmt->closeCursor();

This looks fine for a small query, and it is my understanding that this keeps me safe from the likes of SQL injection and whatnot.

But what if I need to work with a pretty big form? Something like...

$sql = "INSERT INTO ficha_item
    (titulo, tipo_produto, quantidade_peso, unidade_de_venda, 
    unidades_por_caixa, caixas_piso, pisos_palete, tipo_de_palete, 
    unidades_palete, caixas_palete, uni_diametro, uni_largura, 
    uni_profundidade, uni_altura, uni_peso_bruto_unidade, caixa_largura, 
    caixa_profundidade, caixa_altura, altura_palete, volume_unidade, 
    peso_caixa, peso_palete) 
    VALUES (?,?,?,?,?,?,?,?,?,?,?,?,?,?,?,?,?,?,?,?,?)";

I think it becomes tedious counting all these question marks. Is there a cleaner way to do this with PDO?

1
  • Consider an ORM instead of building such monstrosities manually.
    – DCoder
    Dec 31, 2012 at 12:22

3 Answers 3

6

I would do something like this:

$fields = array(
    'titulo', 
    'tipo_produto', 
    'quantidade_peso', 
    'unidade_de_venda', 
    'unidades_por_caixa', 
    'caixas_piso', 
    'pisos_palete', 
    'tipo_de_palete', 
    'unidades_palete', 
    'caixas_palete', 
    'uni_diametro', 
    'uni_largura', 
    'uni_profundidade', 
    'uni_altura', 
    'uni_peso_bruto_unidade', 
    'caixa_largura', 
    'caixa_profundidade', 
    'caixa_altura', 
    'altura_palete', 
    'volume_unidade', 
    'peso_caixa', 
    'peso_palete'
);
$sql = 'INSERT INTO ficha_item ( %s ) VALUES ( %s )';
// make a list of field names: titulo, tipo_produto /*, etc. */
$fieldsClause = implode( ', ', $fields );
// make a list of named parameters: :titulo, :tipo_produto /*, etc. */
$valuesClause = implode( ', ', array_map( function( $value ) { return ':' . $value; }, $fields ) );
// or, with create_function
$valuesClause = implode( ', ', array_map( create_function( '$value', 'return ":" . $value;' ), $fields ) );
$sql = sprintf( $sql, $fieldsClause, $valuesClause );

// $sql is now something similar to (formatted for display):
// INSERT INTO ficha_item
//     ( titulo, tipo_produto /*, etc. */ )
// VALUES
//     ( :titulo, :tipo_produto /*, etc. */ )

$stmt = $db->prepare($sql);

// if the keys in $_POST match with $fields, you can now simply pass $_POST here
$stmt->execute( $_POST );
// or, as per Bill Karwin's sound suggestion, with the intersection of $_POST
$stmt->execute( array_intersect_key( $_POST, array_flip( $fields ) ) )

In other words, use named parameters, and have them be dynamically generated based on the $fields array. Although named parameters are not strictly necessary; they do help make things easier, because the order of elements passed to, for instance, PDOStatement::execute()doesn't matter now anymore.

This assumes though, that the number of elements and their keys in $_POST, exactly match the number of fields and their names in $sql.

5
  • 3
    +1 but I would recommend restricting the parameter values: $stmt->execute(array_intersect_key($_POST, array_flip($fields))). Dec 31, 2012 at 7:52
  • Combined with Bill's input, this looks good. My test server is not running PHP 5.3 though, could I get an example using create_function? (PHP versions below 5.3 don't support anonymous functions), I tried implementing this on my own, but my PHP newbie-ness is impairing me! Dec 31, 2012 at 10:34
  • @BillKarwin Thanks Bill, I've added your suggestion. Dec 31, 2012 at 12:20
  • 1
    @JoaoFerreira Done. You should be good now. The key with create_function is to use single quotes around their arguments, otherwise variable names get parsed. Perhaps this was why you couldn't get it to work (just a wild guess though). Dec 31, 2012 at 12:24
  • Fantastic answer. Made a generic function version of this for my own use that's very handy. Sep 3, 2013 at 5:32
2

You may create your SQL dynamically:

$allowed_fields = array(
    'titulo', 
    'tipo_produto', 
    'quantidade_peso', 
    'unidade_de_venda', 
    'unidades_por_caixa', 
    'caixas_piso', 
    'pisos_palete', 
    'tipo_de_palete', 
    'unidades_palete', 
    'caixas_palete', 
    'uni_diametro', 
    'uni_largura', 
    'uni_profundidade', 
    'uni_altura', 
    'uni_peso_bruto_unidade', 
    'caixa_largura', 
    'caixa_profundidade', 
    'caixa_altura', 
    'altura_palete', 
    'volume_unidade', 
    'peso_caixa', 
    'peso_palete'
);

$columns = "";
$values = "";
$values_arr = array();
foreach ( $_POST as $key=>$value )
{
    if ( !in_array($key, $allowed_fields) ) continue;
    $columns .= "$key, ";
    $values .= "?, ";
    $values_arr[] = $value;
}
// now remove trailing ", " from $columns and $values
$columns = rtrim($columns, ", ");
$values = rtrim($values, ", ");
// finish them
$sql = "INSERT INTO ficha_item($columns) VALUES($values)";
$stmt = $db->prepare($sql);
$stmt->execute($values_arr);
$stmt->closeCursor();
1

Using bindParam method, it's the clea(n|r)est way to do what you expect. This is more understandable than with question marks. So the code will be more maintainable.

Example from the official php doc :

Example #1 Execute a prepared statement with named placeholders

<?php
/* Execute a prepared statement by         binding PHP variables */
$calories = 150;
$colour = 'red';
$sth = $dbh->prepare('SELECT name, colour, calories
FROM fruit
WHERE calories < :calories AND colour = :colour');
$sth->bindParam(':calories', $calories, PDO::PARAM_INT);
$sth->bindParam(':colour', $colour, PDO::PARAM_STR, 12);
$sth->execute();
?>

hope this helps.

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