Consider the following contenteditable div.

<div contenteditable="true">
<div>bold text</div><div>bold text</div>
</div>

If I position the cursor between the two divs and start typing the text comes out bold instead of inserting a new text node between the two divs. The same happens if you hit home and try to type something in front of the first div. It becomes part of the first div.

If I inspect the startContainer of the range that's returned from the selection, I get the content for one of the div's instead of an empty text node as I would expect.

See this http://jsfiddle.net/9ZZpX/3/

The question is why does this happen? How can I select the spot between the divs so that when I type something it does not bold? (Obviously I can add a space and that works around the problem but that's quite ugly.)

You can see this working correctly at Facebook if you enter an @mention in a status update box and press HOME. If you type the text will not get highlighted.

The only thing I've been able to think of is intercepting the keypress and inserting a text node programmatically but that seems ugly.

I searched like crazy and can't find any references that document how this is really supposed to work. There is obviously something that I do not understand and the documentation is really lacking in this area.

(What I want to be able to do as well is detect when the cursor is about to enter one of these divs and jump over it. If the two divs are right next to each other, the cursor jumps into one of the divs and it mucks up the works.)

More info on what I'm trying to do: http://a-software-guy.com/2012/12/the-horrors-of-cursor-positioning-in-contenteditable-divs/

  • I upvoted for the article. Thanks for documenting! – Danny Harding Jul 20 '16 at 15:53
up vote 8 down vote accepted

Browsers are inconsistent on this. Firefox will let you position the caret in more positions than most browsers but WebKit and IE both have definite ideas about valid caret positions and will amend a range you add to the selection to conform to the nearest valid position. This does make sense: having different document positions and hence behaviours for the same visual caret location is confusing for the user. However, this comes at the cost of inflexibility for the developer.

This is not documented anywhere. The current Selection spec says nothing about it, principally because no spec existed when browsers implemented their selection APIs and there is no uniform behaviour for the current spec to document.

One option would be to intercept the keypress event as you suggest, although this will not help when the user pastes in content using the edit or context menus. Another would be to keep track of the selection using mouse and key events, create elements with, say, a zero-width space character for the caret to be placed in and place the caret in one those elements when necessary. As you say, ugly.

  • Thank you. Excellent. This is exactly what I needed. – Yermo Lamers Dec 31 '12 at 19:09
  • 1
    (BTW, thank you for Rangy. Very useful.) – Yermo Lamers Dec 31 '12 at 19:30
  • An article about my efforts and the approach I'm trying: a-software-guy.com/2013/01/… – Yermo Lamers Jan 11 '13 at 1:01
  • @YermoLamers: Good article. A lot of it mirrors my own experiences. By the way, I've had more consistently zero-width results (ab)using Unicode BOM (U+FEFF) characters rather than U+200B. – Tim Down Jan 11 '13 at 10:17
  • 1
    I've moved the article here: miles-by-motorcycle.com/fv-b-8-665/… – Yermo Lamers Mar 13 '15 at 2:42

My answer will be just an addition to Tim's one, which is comprehensive.

AFAIK Facebook doesn't use content editable. Status box is made of a simple textarea and div layer underneath it on which they render blue rects for nicks.

Although, even if they did, that would be a different case, because nick would be an inline element and luckily with inline elements situation is simpler :).

Regarding positioning caret at inaccessible places - at CKEditor we had the same problem. There are many places where user can't move caret. We decided to solve this issue with a plugin called Magic-line. As you can see in the demo we bypassed the problem with selection completely and I think that this is the best way to solve this issue. It's very usable and in CKEditor 4.0.1 it will be (and already is on master) also fully accessible by keystrokes.

  • This is an interesting solution. +1. – Tim Down Jan 1 '13 at 16:29
  • Very interesting +1. I started trying to replicate what Facebook did, but realized quickly that what I want to accomplish a bit different. Just an off topic heads up, if you open up a line at the top, there doesn't seem to be a way, in Chrome under Linux, to delete the top line. I press delete and the whole area gets highlighted. – Yermo Lamers Jan 1 '13 at 18:41

Another thing you can do is use a Mutation Observer to catch the mutations and then fix them up after the fact. In my use case I was fortunate in that each element had predefined text. When the mutation observer fires, I simply moved changed text to a new text node before or after the element as appropriate. This seems a lot easier than the other options because the observer fires for all changes to character data, and it also has a proper record of all of the changes, unlike say keypress event.

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