204

I need to test if a user can write to a folder before actually attempting to do so.

I've implemented the following method (in C# 2.0) that attempts to retrieve the security permissions for the folder using Directory.GetAccessControl() method.

private bool hasWriteAccessToFolder(string folderPath)
{
    try
    {
        // Attempt to get a list of security permissions from the folder. 
        // This will raise an exception if the path is read only or do not have access to view the permissions. 
        System.Security.AccessControl.DirectorySecurity ds = Directory.GetAccessControl(folderPath);
        return true;
    }
    catch (UnauthorizedAccessException)
    {
        return false;
    }
}

When I was googling how to test for write access nothing like this came up and it appeared very complicated to actually test permissions in Windows. I am concerned that I am over-simplifying things and that this method is not robust, although it does seem to work.

Will my method to test if the current user has write access work correctly?

1
  • 14
    Is not having access to view the permissions really the same as not being allowed to write to it?
    – deed02392
    Sep 19 '13 at 15:02

18 Answers 18

74

I appreciate that this is a little late in the day for this post, but you might find this bit of code useful.

string path = @"c:\temp";
string NtAccountName = @"MyDomain\MyUserOrGroup";

DirectoryInfo di = new DirectoryInfo(path);
DirectorySecurity acl = di.GetAccessControl(AccessControlSections.All);
AuthorizationRuleCollection rules = acl.GetAccessRules(true, true, typeof(NTAccount));

//Go through the rules returned from the DirectorySecurity
foreach (AuthorizationRule rule in rules)
{
    //If we find one that matches the identity we are looking for
    if (rule.IdentityReference.Value.Equals(NtAccountName,StringComparison.CurrentCultureIgnoreCase))
    {
        var filesystemAccessRule = (FileSystemAccessRule)rule;

        //Cast to a FileSystemAccessRule to check for access rights
        if ((filesystemAccessRule.FileSystemRights & FileSystemRights.WriteData)>0 && filesystemAccessRule.AccessControlType != AccessControlType.Deny)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(string.Format("{0} has write access to {1}", NtAccountName, path));
        }
        else
        {
            Console.WriteLine(string.Format("{0} does not have write access to {1}", NtAccountName, path));
        }
    }
}

Console.ReadLine();

Drop that into a Console app and see if it does what you need.

14
  • Right on target! Helps me a lot! Nov 30 '11 at 2:27
  • I get an exception on the call to GetAccessControl but my software is actualy capable of writing to the directory I'm looking at.. ?
    – Jon Cage
    May 10 '12 at 13:50
  • @JonCage - what exception are you getting? The first thing that leaps to mind is, ironically, a security problem. Does the account that your app is running as have permission to get the ACL information? May 16 '12 at 20:48
  • 2
    You need to add a check for FileSystemAccessRule type. If it's a Deny rule, you will incorrectly report it as writable.
    – tdemay
    Dec 29 '17 at 23:57
  • 2
    I'm trying to use this. Found another problem. If rights are only assigned to groups and not specific users this will incorrectly report they don't have write access. For example, write access granted to "Authenticated users"
    – tdemay
    Jan 2 '18 at 15:49
73
public bool IsDirectoryWritable(string dirPath, bool throwIfFails = false)
{
    try
    {
        using (FileStream fs = File.Create(
            Path.Combine(
                dirPath, 
                Path.GetRandomFileName()
            ), 
            1,
            FileOptions.DeleteOnClose)
        )
        { }
        return true;
    }
    catch
    {
        if (throwIfFails)
            throw;
        else
            return false;
    }
}
8
  • 8
    This answer will catch all exceptions that could occur when trying to write a file, not just permission violations.
    – Matt Ellen
    Jun 17 '11 at 9:42
  • 7
    @G.Y, string tempFileName = Path.GetRandomFileName();, evidently Feb 5 '14 at 9:37
  • 3
    @Matt, this answers exactly the asked question "is the directory is writable" regardless of the reason of failure, however. You rather answer to "why i can't write to the directory". :) Feb 5 '14 at 9:43
  • 1
    I get a false positive with this code. The File.Create() runs OK (and leaves a temp file if you change the last option) even though the executing user has no permission to write to that folder. Really really odd - spent an hour trying to figure out why but I'm stumped.
    – NickG
    Feb 10 '15 at 11:49
  • 4
    From all alternatives which I have tried below (and referenced links) - this is the only one which works reliably. Apr 21 '15 at 8:10
66

That's a perfectly valid way to check for folder access in C#. The only place it might fall down is if you need to call this in a tight loop where the overhead of an exception may be an issue.

There have been other similar questions asked previously.

3
  • 1
    Funnily enough I had one of those other questions open in another tab but hadn't seen the answer about DirectorySecurity, teach me to read all the answers not just the accepted one;-)
    – Chris B
    Sep 11 '09 at 10:45
  • Won't it also fall down when you use long paths in Windows?
    – Alexandru
    Apr 20 '15 at 18:18
  • 14
    That won't tell you if you have write permission, it will only tell you if you can look up permissions on that folder or not. Also you might be able to write but not be able to look up permissions.
    – RandomEngy
    May 26 '15 at 0:15
27

I tried most of these, but they give false positives, all for the same reason.. It is not enough to test the directory for an available permission, you have to check that the logged in user is a member of a group that has that permission. To do this you get the users identity, and check if it is a member of a group that contains the FileSystemAccessRule IdentityReference. I have tested this, works flawlessly..

    /// <summary>
    /// Test a directory for create file access permissions
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="DirectoryPath">Full path to directory </param>
    /// <param name="AccessRight">File System right tested</param>
    /// <returns>State [bool]</returns>
    public static bool DirectoryHasPermission(string DirectoryPath, FileSystemRights AccessRight)
    {
        if (string.IsNullOrEmpty(DirectoryPath)) return false;

        try
        {
            AuthorizationRuleCollection rules = Directory.GetAccessControl(DirectoryPath).GetAccessRules(true, true, typeof(System.Security.Principal.SecurityIdentifier));
            WindowsIdentity identity = WindowsIdentity.GetCurrent();

            foreach (FileSystemAccessRule rule in rules)
            {
                if (identity.Groups.Contains(rule.IdentityReference))
                {
                    if ((AccessRight & rule.FileSystemRights) == AccessRight)
                    {
                        if (rule.AccessControlType == AccessControlType.Allow)
                            return true;
                    }
                }
            }
        }
        catch { }
        return false;
    }
6
  • Thanks John, I've got false positive as well until I've using your code to check user group again the rule IdentifyReference!
    – Paul L
    Jun 22 '17 at 19:50
  • 1
    i had to add an additional check for identity.Owner == rule.IdentityReference as I had a user who given access but not in any groups, like a dedicated local account for services
    – grinder22
    Jun 12 '18 at 20:51
  • 2
    AccessControlType deny takes precedence over allow, so to be completely thorough rules that deny the access right should be checked as well, and when checking for deny types it should be (AccessRight & rule.FileSystemRights) > 0 because any sub access type denied that is part of AccessRight means you don't have full access to AccessRight Oct 3 '18 at 15:45
  • As grinder22 mentioned above, I needed to change; if (identity.Groups.Contains(rule.IdentityReference)) to if (identity.Groups.Contains(rule.IdentityReference) || identity.Owner.Equals(rule.IdentityReference)) as I had a user who had access but wasn't in any of the groups.
    – ehambright
    Nov 20 '19 at 17:21
  • 1
    @NickeManarin There could be a rule that allows access, but also a different rule that denies access, and deny overrides allow, so it's not enough to just skip the deny rules. Also, if you want the access right of read and write, but there is a rule denying write access, then that will prevent full read and write access even if there is a rule that allows read and write. Sep 14 '20 at 18:40
15

IMHO the only 100% reliable way to test if you can write to a directory is to actually write to it and eventually catch exceptions.

14

For example for all users (Builtin\Users), this method works fine - enjoy.

public static bool HasFolderWritePermission(string destDir)
{
   if(string.IsNullOrEmpty(destDir) || !Directory.Exists(destDir)) return false;
   try
   {
      DirectorySecurity security = Directory.GetAccessControl(destDir);
      SecurityIdentifier users = new SecurityIdentifier(WellKnownSidType.BuiltinUsersSid, null);
      foreach(AuthorizationRule rule in security.GetAccessRules(true, true, typeof(SecurityIdentifier)))
      {
          if(rule.IdentityReference == users)
          {
             FileSystemAccessRule rights = ((FileSystemAccessRule)rule);
             if(rights.AccessControlType == AccessControlType.Allow)
             {
                    if(rights.FileSystemRights == (rights.FileSystemRights | FileSystemRights.Modify)) return true;
             }
          }
       }
       return false;
    }
    catch
    {
        return false;
    }
}
9

Try this:

try
{
    DirectoryInfo di = new DirectoryInfo(path);
    DirectorySecurity acl = di.GetAccessControl();
    AuthorizationRuleCollection rules = acl.GetAccessRules(true, true, typeof(NTAccount));

    WindowsIdentity currentUser = WindowsIdentity.GetCurrent();
    WindowsPrincipal principal = new WindowsPrincipal(currentUser);
    foreach (AuthorizationRule rule in rules)
    {
        FileSystemAccessRule fsAccessRule = rule as FileSystemAccessRule;
        if (fsAccessRule == null)
            continue;

        if ((fsAccessRule.FileSystemRights & FileSystemRights.WriteData) > 0)
        {
            NTAccount ntAccount = rule.IdentityReference as NTAccount;
            if (ntAccount == null)
            {
                continue;
            }

            if (principal.IsInRole(ntAccount.Value))
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Current user is in role of {0}, has write access", ntAccount.Value);
                continue;
            }
            Console.WriteLine("Current user is not in role of {0}, does not have write access", ntAccount.Value);                        
        }
    }
}
catch (UnauthorizedAccessException)
{
    Console.WriteLine("does not have write access");
}
2
  • If I'm not mistaken, this is close but not quite there -- it overlooks the fact that fsAccessRule.AccessControlType could be AccessControlType.Deny. Jun 19 '17 at 21:23
  • This was working for me on my Win7 dev machine but fails on Win10 (both for a tester and my own test machine). ssds's modification (see below) appears to fix it.
    – winwaed
    Oct 28 '17 at 20:07
7

Your code gets the DirectorySecurity for a given directory, and handles an exception (due to your not having access to the security info) correctly. However, in your sample you don't actually interrogate the returned object to see what access is allowed - and I think you need to add this in.

1
  • +1 - I just ran into this problem where an exception was not thrown when calling GetAccessControl yet I get an unauthorized exception when attempting to write to that same directory.
    – Mayo
    Jan 20 '11 at 15:49
7

Here is a modified version of CsabaS's answer, which accounts for explicit deny access rules. The function goes through all FileSystemAccessRules for a directory, and checks if the current user is in a role which has access to a directory. If no such roles are found or the user is in a role with denied access, the function returns false. To check read rights, pass FileSystemRights.Read to the function; for write rights, pass FileSystemRights.Write. If you want to check an arbitrary user's rights and not the current one's, substitute the currentUser WindowsIdentity for the desired WindowsIdentity. I would also advise against relying on functions like this to determine if the user can safely use the directory. This answer perfectly explains why.

    public static bool UserHasDirectoryAccessRights(string path, FileSystemRights accessRights)
    {
        var isInRoleWithAccess = false;

        try
        {
            var di = new DirectoryInfo(path);
            var acl = di.GetAccessControl();
            var rules = acl.GetAccessRules(true, true, typeof(NTAccount));

            var currentUser = WindowsIdentity.GetCurrent();
            var principal = new WindowsPrincipal(currentUser);
            foreach (AuthorizationRule rule in rules)
            {
                var fsAccessRule = rule as FileSystemAccessRule;
                if (fsAccessRule == null)
                    continue;

                if ((fsAccessRule.FileSystemRights & accessRights) > 0)
                {
                    var ntAccount = rule.IdentityReference as NTAccount;
                    if (ntAccount == null)
                        continue;

                    if (principal.IsInRole(ntAccount.Value))
                    {
                        if (fsAccessRule.AccessControlType == AccessControlType.Deny)
                            return false;
                        isInRoleWithAccess = true;
                    }
                }
            }
        }
        catch (UnauthorizedAccessException)
        {
            return false;
        }
        return isInRoleWithAccess;
    }
1
  • Csaba's code was failing for me on Windows 10 (but fine on my Win7 dev machine). The above appears to fix the problem.
    – winwaed
    Oct 28 '17 at 20:06
7

Above solutions are good but for me, I find this code simple and workable. Just create a temporary file. If the file is created, its mean user has the write access.

        public static bool HasWritePermission(string tempfilepath)
        {
            try
            {
                System.IO.File.Create(tempfilepath + "temp.txt").Close();
                System.IO.File.Delete(tempfilepath + "temp.txt");
            }
            catch (System.UnauthorizedAccessException ex)
            {

                return false;
            }

            return true;
        }
4
  • 3
    Nice! One thing though is the that user might have Create permission but not Delete in which case this would return false even though the user does have write permission.
    – Chris B
    Jan 30 '18 at 10:12
  • Most convenient answer for coding :) I also use this one only, however, when there are large concurrent requests then so much read/write might slow down performance so in those cases you can use accesscontrol methodology as given in other answers.
    – vibs2006
    Jun 21 '18 at 9:44
  • 2
    Use Path.Combine instead such as Path.Combine(tempfilepath, "temp.txt").
    – ΩmegaMan
    Dec 9 '19 at 18:17
  • It's better to use GUID for the temp file's name. Jan 22 at 6:46
4

You can try following code block to check if the directory is having Write Access. It checks the FileSystemAccessRule.

string directoryPath = "C:\\XYZ"; //folderBrowserDialog.SelectedPath;
bool isWriteAccess = false;
try
{
    AuthorizationRuleCollection collection =
        Directory.GetAccessControl(directoryPath)
            .GetAccessRules(true, true, typeof(System.Security.Principal.NTAccount));
    foreach (FileSystemAccessRule rule in collection)
    {
        if (rule.AccessControlType == AccessControlType.Allow)
        {
            isWriteAccess = true;
            break;
        }
    }
}
catch (UnauthorizedAccessException ex)
{
    isWriteAccess = false;
}
catch (Exception ex)
{
    isWriteAccess = false;
}
if (!isWriteAccess)
{
    //handle notifications 
}
0
3

You have a potential race condition in your code--what happens if the user has permissions to write to the folder when you check, but before the user actually writes to the folder this permission is withdrawn? The write will throw an exception which you will need to catch and handle. So the initial check is pointless. You might as well just do the write and handle any exceptions. This is the standard pattern for your situation.

1
  • What about letting the user know that the default location they chose in their configuration dialog does not have the appropriate permissions for storing received content files? Sure at some point later (0-999 days time) when a content file is actually received you'd have to handle the exception anyway as the permission may have changed, but it's better UX to warn the user when they set their initial configuration.
    – Reahreic
    Feb 12 at 18:38
3

http://www.codeproject.com/KB/files/UserFileAccessRights.aspx

Very usefull Class, check for improved version in messages bellow.

2

Simply trying to access the file in question isn't necessarily enough. The test will run with the permissions of the user running the program - Which isn't necessarily the user permissions you want to test against.

0

I agree with Ash, that should be fine. Alternatively you could use declarative CAS and actually prevent the program from running in the first place if they don't have access.

I believe some of the CAS features may not be present in C# 4.0 from what I've heard, not sure if that might be an issue or not.

0

I couldn't get GetAccessControl() to throw an exception on Windows 7 as recommended in the accepted answer.

I ended up using a variation of sdds's answer:

        try
        {
            bool writeable = false;
            WindowsPrincipal principal = new WindowsPrincipal(WindowsIdentity.GetCurrent());
            DirectorySecurity security = Directory.GetAccessControl(pstrPath);
            AuthorizationRuleCollection authRules = security.GetAccessRules(true, true, typeof(SecurityIdentifier));

            foreach (FileSystemAccessRule accessRule in authRules)
            {

                if (principal.IsInRole(accessRule.IdentityReference as SecurityIdentifier))
                {
                    if ((FileSystemRights.WriteData & accessRule.FileSystemRights) == FileSystemRights.WriteData)
                    {
                        if (accessRule.AccessControlType == AccessControlType.Allow)
                        {
                            writeable = true;
                        }
                        else if (accessRule.AccessControlType == AccessControlType.Deny)
                        {
                            //Deny usually overrides any Allow
                            return false;
                        }

                    } 
                }
            }
            return writeable;
        }
        catch (UnauthorizedAccessException)
        {
            return false;
        }

Hope this helps.

0

I faced the same problem: how to verify if I can read/write in a particular directory. I ended up with the easy solution to...actually test it. Here is my simple though effective solution.

 class Program
{

    /// <summary>
    /// Tests if can read files and if any are present
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="dirPath"></param>
    /// <returns></returns>
    private genericResponse check_canRead(string dirPath)
    {
        try
        {
            IEnumerable<string> files = Directory.EnumerateFiles(dirPath);
            if (files.Count().Equals(0))
                return new genericResponse() { status = true, idMsg = genericResponseType.NothingToRead };

            return new genericResponse() { status = true, idMsg = genericResponseType.OK };
        }
        catch (DirectoryNotFoundException ex)
        {

            return new genericResponse() { status = false, idMsg = genericResponseType.ItemNotFound };

        }
        catch (UnauthorizedAccessException ex)
        {

            return new genericResponse() { status = false, idMsg = genericResponseType.CannotRead };

        }

    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Tests if can wirte both files or Directory
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="dirPath"></param>
    /// <returns></returns>
    private genericResponse check_canWrite(string dirPath)
    {

        try
        {
            string testDir = "__TESTDIR__";
            Directory.CreateDirectory(string.Join("/", dirPath, testDir));

            Directory.Delete(string.Join("/", dirPath, testDir));


            string testFile = "__TESTFILE__.txt";
            try
            {
                TextWriter tw = new StreamWriter(string.Join("/", dirPath, testFile), false);
                tw.WriteLine(testFile);
                tw.Close();
                File.Delete(string.Join("/", dirPath, testFile));

                return new genericResponse() { status = true, idMsg = genericResponseType.OK };
            }
            catch (UnauthorizedAccessException ex)
            {

                return new genericResponse() { status = false, idMsg = genericResponseType.CannotWriteFile };

            }


        }
        catch (UnauthorizedAccessException ex)
        {

            return new genericResponse() { status = false, idMsg = genericResponseType.CannotWriteDir };

        }
    }


}

public class genericResponse
{

    public bool status { get; set; }
    public genericResponseType idMsg { get; set; }
    public string msg { get; set; }

}

public enum genericResponseType
{

    NothingToRead = 1,
    OK = 0,
    CannotRead = -1,
    CannotWriteDir = -2,
    CannotWriteFile = -3,
    ItemNotFound = -4

}

Hope it helps !

-1

Most of the answers here does not check for write access. It just check if the user/group can 'Read Permission' (Read the ACE list of the file/directory).

Also iterating through ACE and checking if it matches the Security Identifier does not work because the user can be a member of a group from which he might get/lose privilege. Worse than that is nested groups.

I know this is an old thread but there is a better way for any one looking now.

Provided the user has Read Permission privilege is, one can use the Authz API to check Effective access.

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/win32/secauthz/using-authz-api

https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/win32/secauthz/checking-access-with-authz-api

0

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