I have trouble understanding how to compute the lookaheads for the LR(1)-items.

Lets say that I have this grammar:

S -> AB
A -> aAb | a
B -> d

A LR(1)-item is an LR(0) item with a lookahead. So we will get the following LR(0)-item for state 0:

S -> .AB , {lookahead} 
A -> .aAb,  {lookahead} 
A -> .a,  {lookahead}

State: 1

A ->  a.Ab, {lookahead} 
A ->  a. ,{lookahead} 
A -> .aAb ,{lookahead} 
A ->.a ,{lookahead}

Can somebody explain how to compute the lookaheads ? What is the general approach ?

Thank you in advance

up vote 27 down vote accepted
+25

The lookaheads used in an LR(1) parser are computed as follows. First, the start state has an item of the form

S -> .w  ($)

for every production S -> w, where S is the start symbol. Here, the $ marker denotes the end of the input.

Next, for any state that contains an item of the form A -> x.By (t), where x is an arbitrary string of terminals and nonterminals and B is a nonterminal, you add an item of the form B -> .w (s) for every production B -> w and for every terminal in the set FIRST(yt). (Here, FIRST refers to FIRST sets, which are usually introduced when talking about LL parsers. If you haven't seen them before, I would take a few minutes to look over those lecture notes).

Let's try this out on your grammar. We start off by creating an item set containing

S -> .AB ($)

Next, using our second rule, for every production of A, we add in a new item corresponding to that production and with lookaheads of every terminal in FIRST(B$). Since B always produces the string d, FIRST(B$) = d, so all of the productions we introduce will have lookahead d. This gives

S -> .AB ($)
A -> .aAb (d)
A -> .a (d)

Now, let's build the state corresponding to seeing an 'a' in this initial state. We start by moving the dot over one step for each production that starts with a:

A -> a.Ab (d)
A -> a. (d)

Now, since the first item has a dot before a nonterminal, we use our rule to add one item for each production of A, giving those items lookahead FIRST(bd) = b. This gives

A -> a.Ab (d)
A -> a. (d)
A -> .aAb (b)
A -> .a (b)

Continuing this process will ultimately construct all the LR(1) states for this LR(1) parser. This is shown here:

[0]
S -> .AB  ($)
A -> .aAb (d)
A -> .a   (d)

[1]
A -> a.Ab (d)
A -> a.   (d)
A -> .aAb (b)
A -> .a   (b)

[2]
A -> a.Ab (b)
A -> a.   (b)
A -> .aAb (b)
A -> .a   (b)

[3]
A -> aA.b (d)

[4]
A -> aAb. (d)

[5]
S -> A.B  ($)
B -> .d   ($)

[6]
B -> d.   ($)

[7]
S -> AB.  ($)

[8]
A -> aA.b (b)

[9]
A -> aAb. (b)

In case it helps, I taught a compilers course last summer and have all the lecture slides available online. The slides on bottom-up parsing should cover all of the details of LR parsing and parse table construction, and I hope that you find them useful!

Hope this helps!

  • Thank you. Can you explain why $ is included in the lookahead sets in the following grammar, but it's not in FIRST($A) ? S → •A {$} A → • AA {$, b} A → • bc {$ ,b } – mrjasmin Jan 2 '13 at 23:47
  • @mrjasmin- I need to see more of the grammar to know what the FIRST and lookahead sets should be; can you post more? Also, note that you shouldn't be computing FIRST($A) anywhere. If you have A -> .AA ($), the lookaheads for the resulting items would be the terminals in FIRST(A$), not FIRST($A). Does that help at all? – templatetypedef Jan 2 '13 at 23:57
  • Hi ! This question is from an exam and all that is given is: S -> .A {$} A -> .AA { } A -> .bc { } The student is supposed to find the lookahead set- And the answer is the post above. I don't understand how $ is a lookahead – mrjasmin Jan 3 '13 at 0:01
  • @mrjasmin- The initial $ probably comes from the fact that S is the start symbol, so its production is always marked with a $ after the fact. The production A -> .AA would therefore initially have $ as a lookahead, as would A -> bc. Next, since A -> .AA ($) is an item, you'd add in new items for each production of A, with lookaheads FIRST(A$). Since A -> bc is a production of A, the only element of FIRST(A$) is b. Thus you'd add A -> .AA (b) and A -> .bc (b) to the item set. Merging these with A -> .AA ($) and A -> .bc ($) gives A -> .AA ($, b) and A -> .bc ($, b). Does that make sense? – templatetypedef Jan 3 '13 at 0:10
  • Why would the production A -> .AA initially have $ as a lookahead ? Shouldn't A -> aAb | a also have $ initially then ? Thanks – mrjasmin Jan 3 '13 at 0:19

here is the LR(1) automaton for the grammar as the follow has been done above I think it's better for the understanding to trying draw the automaton and the flow will make the idea of the lookaheads clearer

here is the automaton for the grammar

The LR(1) item set constructed by you should have two more items.

I8 A--> aA.b , b from I2

I9 A--> aAb. , b from I8

  • Please let me know if I am wrong – Ajay Apr 3 '13 at 6:44
  • You're correct. I've updated my answer. – templatetypedef Oct 29 '15 at 18:02

I also get 11 states, not 8:

State 0
        S: .A B ["$"]
        A: .a A b ["d"]
        A: .a ["d"]
    Transitions
        S -> 1
        A -> 2
        a -> 5
    Reductions
        none
State 1
        S_Prime: S .$ ["$"]
    Transitions
        none
    Reductions
        none
State 2
        S: A .B ["$"]
        B: .d ["$"]
    Transitions
        B -> 3
        d -> 4
    Reductions
        none
State 3
        S: A B .["$"]
    Transitions
        none
    Reductions
        $ => S: A B .
State 4
        B: d .["$"]
    Transitions
        none
    Reductions
        $ => B: d .
State 5
        A: a .A b ["d"]
        A: .a A b ["b"]
        A: .a ["b"]
        A: a .["d"]
    Transitions
        A -> 6
        a -> 8
    Reductions
        d => A: a .
State 6
        A: a A .b ["d"]
    Transitions
        b -> 7
    Reductions
        none
State 7
        A: a A b .["d"]
    Transitions
        none
    Reductions
        d => A: a A b .
State 8
        A: a .A b ["b"]
        A: .a A b ["b"]
        A: .a ["b"]
        A: a .["b"]
    Transitions
        A -> 9
        a -> 8
    Reductions
        b => A: a .
State 9
        A: a A .b ["b"]
    Transitions
        b -> 10
    Reductions
        none
State 10
        A: a A b .["b"]
    Transitions
        none
    Reductions
        b => A: a A b .

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