15

how do set a timeout for a busy method +C#.

12

Ok, here's the real answer.

...

void LongRunningMethod(object monitorSync)
{
   //do stuff    
   lock (monitorSync) {
     Monitor.Pulse(monitorSync);
   }
}

void ImpatientMethod() {
  Action<object> longMethod = LongRunningMethod;
  object monitorSync = new object();
  bool timedOut;
  lock (monitorSync) {
    longMethod.BeginInvoke(monitorSync, null, null);
    timedOut = !Monitor.Wait(monitorSync, TimeSpan.FromSeconds(30)); // waiting 30 secs
  }
  if (timedOut) {
    // it timed out.
  }
}

   ...

This combines two of the most fun parts of using C#. First off, to call the method asynchronously, use a delegate which has the fancy-pants BeginInvoke magic.

Then, use a monitor to send a message from the LongRunningMethod back to the ImpatientMethod to let it know when it's done, or if it hasn't heard from it in a certain amount of time, just give up on it.

(p.s.- Just kidding about this being the real answer. I know there are 2^9303 ways to skin a cat. Especially in .Net)

  • This worked for me :) – Conrad Clark Sep 11 '13 at 10:55
  • 4
    It does work, but !BEWARE! - when the execution flow returns, the "LongRunningMethod" still runs in the background! This can be a leak. – Alex Sep 29 '13 at 21:34
  • That's totally true. This is only nice if you want to stop waiting on an action, not stop an action. – MojoFilter Oct 3 '13 at 19:48
  • 2
    Nowadays, I prefer Task.Wait, but this is nice for using "os primitives", and for exercising the technical term "fancy-pants". – Sully Jul 9 '15 at 14:52
7

You can not do that, unless you change the method.

There are two ways:

  1. The method is built in such a way that it itself measures how long it has been running, and then returns prematurely if it exceeds some threshold.
  2. The method is built in such a way that it monitors a variable/event that says "when this variable is set, please exit", and then you have another thread measure the time spent in the first method, and then set that variable when the time elapsed has exceeded some threshold.

The most obvious, but unfortunately wrong, answer you can get here is "Just run the method in a thread and use Thread.Abort when it has ran for too long".

The only correct way is for the method to cooperate in such a way that it will do a clean exit when it has been running too long.

There's also a third way, where you execute the method on a separate thread, but after waiting for it to finish, and it takes too long to do that, you simply say "I am not going to wait for it to finish, but just discard it". In this case, the method will still run, and eventually finish, but that other thread that was waiting for it will simply give up.

Think of the third way as calling someone and asking them to search their house for that book you lent them, and after you waiting on your end of the phone for 5 minutes you simply say "aw, chuck it", and hang up. Eventually that other person will find the book and get back to the phone, only to notice that you no longer care for the result.

3

While MojoFilter's answer is nice it can lead to leaks if the "LongMethod" freezes. You should ABORT the operation if you're not interested in the result anymore.

public void LongMethod()
{
    //do stuff
}

public void ImpatientMethod()
{
    Action longMethod = LongMethod; //use Func if you need a return value

    ManualResetEvent mre = new ManualResetEvent(false);

    Thread actionThread = new Thread(new ThreadStart(() =>
    {
        var iar = longMethod.BeginInvoke(null, null);
        longMethod.EndInvoke(iar); //always call endinvoke
        mre.Set();
    }));

    actionThread.Start();
    mre.WaitOne(30000); // waiting 30 secs (or less)
    if (actionThread.IsAlive) actionThread.Abort();
}
3

This is an old question but it has a simpler solution now that was not available then: Tasks!

Here is a sample code:

var task = Task.Run(() => LongRunningMethod());//you can pass parameters to the method as well
if (task.Wait(TimeSpan.FromSeconds(30)))
    return task.Result; //the method returns elegantly
else
    throw new TimeoutException();//the method timed-out
2

You can run the method in a separate thread, and monitor it and force it to exit if it works too long. A good way, if you can call it as such, would be to develop an attribute for the method in Post Sharp so the watching code isn't littering your application.

I've written the following as sample code(note the sample code part, it works, but could suffer issues from multithreading, or if the method in question captures the ThreadAbortException would break it):

static void ActualMethodWrapper(Action method, Action callBackMethod)
{
    try
    {
        method.Invoke();
    } catch (ThreadAbortException)
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Method aborted early");
    } finally
    {
        callBackMethod.Invoke();
    }
}

static void CallTimedOutMethod(Action method, Action callBackMethod, int milliseconds)
{
    new Thread(new ThreadStart(() =>
    {
        Thread actionThread = new Thread(new ThreadStart(() =>
        {
            ActualMethodWrapper(method, callBackMethod);
        }));

        actionThread.Start();
        Thread.Sleep(milliseconds);
        if (actionThread.IsAlive) actionThread.Abort();
    })).Start();
}

With the following invocation:

CallTimedOutMethod(() =>
{
    Console.WriteLine("In method");
    Thread.Sleep(2000);
    Console.WriteLine("Method done");
}, () =>
{
    Console.WriteLine("In CallBackMethod");
}, 1000);

I need to work on my code readability.

  • You still need to write code into the method to do a clean exit when it should finish. – Lasse Vågsæther Karlsen Sep 11 '09 at 12:49
  • You mean something like catching the ThreadAbort exception and cleaning up resources / providing exit code? It would really depend on the method in question. – Yuriy Faktorovich Sep 11 '09 at 13:06
  • If by "timeout" he means "I want to close my program and don't wait for the method to complete", then yes, Thread.Abort can be used, but that's really the only scenario. – Lasse Vågsæther Karlsen Sep 11 '09 at 13:44
  • With the sample code, the method could catch the ThreadAbortException to do things such as close database connections, but it would have to re throw it. Maybe I read too much into the question. – Yuriy Faktorovich Sep 11 '09 at 14:36
  • Thread.Sleep is not very good since it will pause for "milliseconds" even if the work finishes SOONER :) – Alex Sep 29 '13 at 21:52
0

Methods don't have timeouts in C#, unless your in the debugger or the OS believes your app has 'hung'. Even then processing still continues and as long as you don't kill the application a response is returned and the app continues to work.

Calls to databases can have timeouts.

0

Could you create an Asynchronous Method so that you can continue doing other stuff whilst the "busy" method completes?

0

I regularly write apps where I have to synchronize time critical tasks across platforms. If you can avoid thread.abort you should. See http://blogs.msdn.com/b/ericlippert/archive/2010/02/22/should-i-specify-a-timeout.aspx and http://www.interact-sw.co.uk/iangblog/2004/11/12/cancellation for guidelines on when thread.abort is appropriate. Here are the concept I implement:

  • Selective execution: Only run if a reasonable chance of success exists (based on ability to meet timeout or likelihood of success result relative to other queued items). If you break code into segments and know roughly the expected time between task chunks, you can predict if you should skip any further processing. Total time can be measured by wrapping an object bin tasks with a recursive function for time calculation or by having a controller class that watches workers to know expected wait times.
  • Selective orphaning: Only wait for return if reasonable chance of success exists. Indexed tasks are run in a managed queue. Tasks that exceed their timeout or risk causing other timeouts are orphaned and a null record is returned in their stead. Longer running tasks can be wrapped in async calls. See example async call wrapper: http://www.vbusers.com/codecsharp/codeget.asp?ThreadID=67&PostID=1
  • Conditional selection: Similar to selective execution but based on group instead of individual task. If many of your tasks are interconnected such that one success or fail renders additional processing irrelevant, create a flag that is checked before execution begins and again before long running sub-tasks begin. This is especially useful when you are using parallel.for or other such queued concurrency tasks.

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