43

Is it possible to instantiate a private inner class from another class using Java reflection. For example if I took this code

public class Main {
    public static void main(String[] args) {}
}

class OtherClass {
    private class Test {}
}

is it possible to instantiate and gain access to Test from the main method in the class main.

4
  • 1
    velocityreviews.com/forums/…
    – tckmn
    Jan 1, 2013 at 16:42
  • To created a nested class, you must have an instance of an outer class. Jan 1, 2013 at 17:19
  • The class being private indicates you should not do this.
    – Raedwald
    May 15, 2015 at 10:17
  • 1
    @PeterLawrey to be more precise, to create an Inner class (a non-static nested class) you need to have an instance of the outer class. To create an instance of a Static Nested class, you don't need an instance of the outer class.
    – Ray
    Apr 7, 2018 at 19:09

3 Answers 3

45

Yes, you can instantiate a private inner class with Java reflection. To do that, you need to have an instance of outer class and invoke the inner class constructor which will use outer class instance in its first argument.

class OuterClass {
    private class InnerClass {
        {
            //this block is just to confirm that the inner object was created
            //it will be added to every constructor of this class
            System.out.println("inner object created");
        }
    }
}

When we don't know name of private inner class and we assume that it has no-argument constructor:

class Main {

    //no comment version
    public static Object giveMeInnerInstance() throws Exception{
        OuterClass outerObject = new OuterClass();
        Class<?> innerClass = OuterClass.class.getDeclaredClasses()[0];
        Constructor<?> constructor = innerClass.getDeclaredConstructors()[0];
        constructor.setAccessible(true);
        return constructor.newInstance(outerObject);
    }

    //commented version
    public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
        //we need an outer class object to use the inner object constructor
        //(the inner class object needs to know about its parent object)
        OuterClass outerObject = new OuterClass();

        //let's get the inner class 
        //(we know that the outer class has only one inner class, so we can use index 0)
        Class<?> innerClass = OuterClass.class.getDeclaredClasses()[0];
        //or if we know name of inner class we can use 
        //Class<?> innerClass = Class.forName("full.package.name.OuterClass$InnerClass")

        //since constructor so we could use it to pass instance of outer class and change 
        //its accessibility. We can use this code to get default constructor of InnerClass 
        //since we know that this is the only constructor here
        Constructor<?> constructor = innerClass.getDeclaredConstructors()[0];
        //we could also use 
        //Constructor<?> constructor = innerClass.getDeclaredConstructor(OuterClass.class);

        //the default constructor of the private class has same visibility that class has
        //so it is also private, so to be able to use it we need to make it accessible
        constructor.setAccessible(true);

        //now we are ready to create inner class instance
        Object innerObject = constructor.newInstance(outerObject);
    }
}

Now we can make this code clearer if we have informations like

  • name of inner class,
  • constructor arguments

So instead of checking list of inner classes and picking first one, we can get selected inner class by its name using

Class<?> inner = Class.forName("our.pack.age.OuterClass$InnerClass")
//                                                     ^^^^^^^^^^^

Similarly we can select constructor we want to use by invoking getDeclaredConstructor(outerType,rest,of,parameter,types) so if our inner class would look like

class OuterClass {
    private class InnerClass {

        private int x;

        public InnerClass(int x) {
            this.x = x;
            System.out.println("inner object created");
        }

    }
}

our code could be

class ReflectionDemo {

    //no comment version
    public static Object giveMeInnerInstance() throws Exception{
        OuterClass outerObject = new OuterClass();
        Class<?> innerClass = Class.forName("com.stackoverflow.q14112166.OuterClass$InnerClass");
        Constructor<?> constructor = innerClass.getDeclaredConstructor(OuterClass.class, int.class);
        constructor.setAccessible(true);
        return constructor.newInstance(outerObject,42);
    }

    public static Object getFieldValue(Object obj, String fieldName) throws Exception{
        Class<?> clazz = obj.getClass();
        Field field = clazz.getDeclaredField(fieldName);
        field.setAccessible(true);
        return field.get(obj);
    }

    //lets test our code
    public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
        Object innerClassObject = giveMeInnerInstance();
        System.out.println(getFieldValue(innerClassObject, "x"));           
    }
}

Output:

inner object created
42
20
  • i am sorry to reply so late but what i need to do is return a class object of the class by getting the classes fully qualified name without having an instance of the outer class Jan 5, 2013 at 15:13
  • @popgalop Inner classes are the same as methods. Just like you can't invoke method without object, you can't create object of inner class without object of outer class. Only exception of this rule are nested classes (just like static methods). But I suppose you can't make your inner class nested (by adding static modifier).
    – Pshemo
    Jan 5, 2013 at 16:22
  • @popgalop Maybe if you tell us more about your problem we can find some better solution.
    – Pshemo
    Jan 5, 2013 at 16:30
  • 1
    i am trying to write a method that will return a class with the paramater of a fully qualified name, and the class the the method returns can be any kinf of class(inner, nested) not including anonymous inner classes Jan 5, 2013 at 17:07
  • 1
    @KasunSiyambalapitiya I am not sure what you mean by "create an instance of a private nested static method". Instance is representation of class, we can invoke methods on it, but method don't have their representations (instances). If you want to ask if we can instantiate private static class, then yes, just remember that static inner classes are similar to outer classes, so they don't need outer instance to be created so you can skip them in constructor argument.
    – Pshemo
    Sep 30, 2017 at 12:07
18

When using reflection, you'll find constructors of that inner class taking an instance of the outer class as an additional argument (always the first) .

See these questions for related information:

Example:

import java.lang.reflect.Constructor;
import java.lang.reflect.InvocationTargetException;

public class OuterClass {

    private class InnerClass {

    }

    public OuterClass() {
        super();
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        // instantiate outer class
        OuterClass outer = new OuterClass();

        // List all available constructors.
        // We must use the method getDeclaredConstructors() instead
        // of getConstructors() to get also private constructors.
        for (Constructor<?> ctor : OuterClass.InnerClass.class
                .getDeclaredConstructors()) {
            System.out.println(ctor);
        }

        try {
            // Try to get the constructor with the expected signature.
            Constructor<InnerClass> ctor = OuterClass.InnerClass.class
                    .getDeclaredConstructor(OuterClass.class);
            // This forces the security manager to allow a call
            ctor.setAccessible(true);

            // the call
            try {
                OuterClass.InnerClass inner = ctor.newInstance(outer);
                System.out.println(inner);
            } catch (InstantiationException e) {
                // TODO Auto-generated catch block
                e.printStackTrace();
            } catch (IllegalAccessException e) {
                // TODO Auto-generated catch block
                e.printStackTrace();
            } catch (IllegalArgumentException e) {
                // TODO Auto-generated catch block
                e.printStackTrace();
            } catch (InvocationTargetException e) {
                // TODO Auto-generated catch block
                e.printStackTrace();
            }
        } catch (NoSuchMethodException e) {
            // TODO Auto-generated catch block
            e.printStackTrace();
        } catch (SecurityException e) {
            // TODO Auto-generated catch block
            e.printStackTrace();
        }
    }

}
2
  • 6
    OuterClass.InnerClass.class will work only within OuterClass. We can't use InnerClass.class part outside of it since it is private and most probably our code will not be part of OuterClass (if it was reflection would not be needed).
    – Pshemo
    May 15, 2015 at 9:52
  • @Pshemo outer.new InnerClass(); would indeed do it here. When accessing the inner class with reflection from outside, one would then probably want it to implement an accessible interface for a downcast to an usable type in order to avoid the pain of invoking individual methods via reflection. However, if this is all done in own code (and not for some workarounds for third party libs, etc.), then it might be a design bug - so, not desirable at all. Similar to this example, one could 'steal' a protected member from within the same package or a subclass of the outer class, if it is not final.
    – Sam
    May 15, 2015 at 11:39
1

You can do the following :

public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
    // to get first class in OtherClass
    Class<?> innerClass = OtherClass.class.getDeclaredClasses()[0];
    // getDeclaredConstructors for private constructor
    Constructor<?> constructor = innerClass.getDeclaredConstructors()[0];
    // to enable accessing private constructor
    constructor.setAccessible(true);
    OtherClass outerObject = new OtherClass();
    //// create instance of Test by reflection
    Object o = constructor.newInstance(outerObject);
    System.out.println(o);
}

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