26

Is it possible to include output parameters in a function with TypeScript? Something like Func1(string val1, int out k1, int out k2) in C#.

20

Not currently.

You can return an object that can contain more than one property.

return { k1: 5, k2: 99 };

You can combine this with destructuring so the intermediate object becomes invisible...

function myFunction() {
    return { k1: 5, k2: 99 };
}

const { k1, k2 } = myFunction();

console.log(k1);
console.log(k2);

You could also achieve the same with a tuple, but this is pretty readable.

  • 4
    This is actually better, even in C#. – Boris Yankov Jan 20 '13 at 21:34
  • 1
    how is it better than C# ? You can return a structure like that in C# as well. – 7wp Sep 28 '17 at 21:29
  • @7wp Boris is saying it is better to return an object, rather than use out parameters... even when you are writing C# code. He isn't asserting that TypeScript is better than C#. – Fenton Sep 30 '17 at 11:16
  • In which type of data get it and separate both values into number type? – Ajay Sharma Jul 18 '18 at 4:42
  • 1
    @AjaySharma - I have added an example using destructuring. – Fenton Jul 19 '18 at 12:55
1

Generally, you just return an object with multiple properties, one of which contains your function. Something like this:

var foo = function (val1 : string){
    // do something

    return {
        k1: 22,
        k2: 33
    };
}

You could also make it implement an interface, so you know what to expect as the returned object.

interface IFoo {
    (val1: string): INumbers;
}
interface INumbers {
    k1 : number;
    k2 : number;
}

var foo : IFoo = (val1 : string){
    // do something

    return {
        k1: 22,
        k2: 33
    };
}
1

Typescript passes all parameters with "call by value". But if the parameter is a reference this behaves similarly to "call by reference" most of the time. You can write wrapper classes for primitive types. Here's some code:

var func=function(param:Str){
    param.str="modified";
}
class Str{
    str:string="unmodified";
}
var test:Str=new Str();
alert(test.str); //alerts "unmodified"
func(test);
alert(test.str); //alerts "modified"

You need to be careful, though:

var func=function(param:Str){
    param=new Str("modified");
}
class Str{
    str:string;
    constructor(param:string){
        this.str=param;
    }
}

var test:Str=new Str("unmodified");
alert(test.str); //alerts "unmodified"
func(test);
alert(test.str); //alerts "unmodified"

The function parameter is passed "call by value". Therefore inside the function body you're working with a copy of a reference. This reference points to the same object as the reference that you passed as a parameter, so you can access its members and modify them. But if you assign a new object to the reference all further changes are applied to this new object. Therefore the code above prints unmodified twice. I think C# works this way, too.

1

If you really, really want to have an output parameter, even though you could return an object or an array (as a makeshift tuple object), look at foo and the call site of foo...

function p(s) {
  document.body.appendChild(document.createTextNode(s));
  document.body.appendChild(document.createElement('BR'));
}
function foo(output: any): void {
  output.uno = 1;
  output.dos = 2;
}
var o: any = {};
function foo(o);
p(o.uno + " " + o.dos);
1

If you want to mantain C# like syntax you can use:

function func(val1, k1, k2)
{
    k1.v = 7;
    k2.v = 9;
    return "";
}

and to call it

func("", {}, {});   
0

Sometimes the parameter is undefined and you need to instantiate it inside a method. In that cases you can use "lambda functions" or "arrow functions" and simulate the output parameter with this:

example:

class classA
{
   propertyA : number;
   constructor(value: number){
        propertyA = number;
   }
}

class classB {

    // ...

    exampleMethod(){
       let classAInstance: classA;
       this.sumValueMethod((p) => classAInstance = p, 10);

       if(classAInstance != undefined)
           alert("Yeah"); 
    }

    sumValueMethod(paramA:(p: classA) => any, paramB: number){

       let variableA: classA = new classA(0);
       variableA.propertyA += paramB;

       paramA(variableA);
    }
}
0

Here's another way. Define a callback function which will include your out parameters :

function Func1(val1: string, out: (k1: number, k2: number) => void): void {
    out(1, 2);
}

Example on how to use it:

function anotherFunction(): void {

    let k1: number;
    let k2: number;

    Func1("something", (v1, v2) => {
        k1 = v1;
        k2 = v2;
    });

    console.log(k1); // output: 1
    console.log(k2); // output: 2
}

I find it mostly useful for stuff like this:

const keys: string[] = [];
const values: number[] = [];

function tryGet(key: string, out: (value: number) => void): void {
    const index = keys.indexOf(key);
    if (index >= 0) {
        out(values[index]);
    }
}

function test(): void {

    const key = "myValue";

    tryGet(key, (value) => {
        console.log(`Key '${key}' exist with value ${value}`);
    });
}

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