67

I have a python editor where the user is entering a script or code, which is then put into a main method behind the scenes, while also having every line indented. The problem is that if a user has a multi line string, the indentation made to the whole script affects the string, by inserting a tab in every space. A problem script would be something so simple as:

"""foo
bar
foo2"""

So when in the main method it would look like:

def main():
    """foo
    bar
    foo2"""

and the string would now have an extra tab at the beginning of every line.

-8

So if I get it correctly, you take whatever the user inputs, indent it properly and add it to the rest of your program (and then run that whole program).

So after you put the user input into your program, you could run a regex, that basically takes that forced indentation back. Something like: Within three quotes, replace all "new line markers" followed by four spaces (or a tab) with only a "new line marker".

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  • yep, precisely. That's the only possible solution I've come up with. Not sure why I didn't go ahead with it...I think I might have to do this if nothing better comes up. – Mike Sep 11 '09 at 18:46
  • 21
    @thraxil's suggestion to use textwrap.dedent is the way to go. Consider changing your accepted answer. – Chris Calo Mar 3 '12 at 7:24
  • 3
    @ChrisCalo @ bbenne10's answer is even better – user2297550 Oct 29 '18 at 7:56
124

textwrap.dedent from the standard library is there to automatically undo the wacky indentation.

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  • 7
    The standard library never ceases to hold surprises. – thraxil Sep 11 '09 at 19:33
  • 15
    Note that if the first line starts as """foo, then the first line lacks the leading indentation that the other lines have, so dedent won't do anything. It will work if you wait to start foo on the next line and escape the first newline like this: `"""\` – Scott H May 5 '16 at 16:00
  • 3
    To address the short comings that @ScottH mentions, please see my answer regarding inspect.cleandoc – bbenne10 Dec 1 '17 at 19:25
39

From what I see, a better answer here might be inspect.cleandoc, which does much of what textwrap.dedent does but also fixes the problems that textwrap.dedent has with the leading line.

The below example shows the differences:

>>> import textwrap
>>> import inspect
>>> x = """foo bar
    baz
    foobar
    foobaz
    """
>>> inspect.cleandoc(x)
'foo bar\nbaz\nfoobar\nfoobaz'
>>> textwrap.dedent(x)
'foo bar\n    baz\n    foobar\n    foobaz\n'
>>> y = """
...     foo
...     bar
... """
>>> textwrap.dedent(y)
'\nfoo\nbar\n'
>>> inspect.cleandoc(y)
'foo\nbar'
>>> z = """\tfoo
bar\tbaz
"""
>>> textwrap.dedent(z)
'\tfoo\nbar\tbaz\n'
>>> inspect.cleandoc(z)
'foo\nbar     baz'

Note that inspect.cleandoc also expands internal tabs to spaces. This may be inappropriate for one's use case, but works fine for me.

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  • 1
    Beware that these two aren't exactly equivalent otherwise, and cleandoc does more processing than just removing indents. At the very least, expanding '\t' to ' ' – Brian Oct 11 '19 at 6:29
  • This is true, but I didn't notice at the time. I'll update the answer to reflect at least the tab expansion. – bbenne10 Oct 11 '19 at 13:44
19

What follows the first line of a multiline string is part of the string, and not treated as indentation by the parser. You may freely write:

def main():
    """foo
bar
foo2"""
    pass

and it will do the right thing.

On the other hand, that's not readable, and Python knows it. So if a docstring contains whitespace in it's second line, that amount of whitespace is stripped off when you use help() to view the docstring. Thus, help(main) and the below help(main2) produce the same help info.

def main2():
    """foo
    bar
    foo2"""
    pass
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  • Thanks for the reply. Unfortunately the indentation is completely automated, as my code reads in the script as a string (in Java) and indents every line in that string. – Mike Sep 11 '09 at 18:16
  • I don't think only doc string uses triple quote. This automation won't apply elsewhere – tribbloid Jun 30 '19 at 20:31
  • @tribbloid the special logic for docstrings is specific to the use case of making help() do something nice by default. To use the same dedenting logic in other places, you can use textwrap.dedent() as described in basically every other answer to this question. – SingleNegationElimination Aug 22 '19 at 0:39
1

The only way i see - is to strip first n tabs for each line starting with second, where n is known identation of main method.

If that identation is not known beforehand - you can add trailing newline before inserting it and strip number of tabs from the last line...

The third solution is to parse data and find beginning of multiline quote and do not add your identation to every line after until it will be closed.

Think there is a better solution..

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  • Thanks for the reply. So you are suggesting I strip each line of the indentation that has been inserted? I'm confused... – Mike Sep 11 '09 at 18:15
0

Showing the difference between textwrap.dedent and inspect.cleandoc with a little more clarity:

Behavior with the leading part not indented

import textwrap
import inspect

string1="""String
with
no indentation
       """
string2="""String
        with
        indentation
       """
print('string1 plain=' + repr(string1))
print('string1 inspect.cleandoc=' + repr(inspect.cleandoc(string1)))
print('string1 texwrap.dedent=' + repr(textwrap.dedent(string1)))
print('string2 plain=' + repr(string2))
print('string2 inspect.cleandoc=' + repr(inspect.cleandoc(string2)))
print('string2 texwrap.dedent=' + repr(textwrap.dedent(string2)))

Output

string1 plain='String\nwith\nno indentation\n       '
string1 inspect.cleandoc='String\nwith\nno indentation\n       '
string1 texwrap.dedent='String\nwith\nno indentation\n'
string2 plain='String\n        with\n        indentation\n       '
string2 inspect.cleandoc='String\nwith\nindentation'
string2 texwrap.dedent='String\n        with\n        indentation\n'

Behavior with the leading part indented

string1="""
String
with
no indentation
       """
string2="""
        String
        with
        indentation
       """

print('string1 plain=' + repr(string1))
print('string1 inspect.cleandoc=' + repr(inspect.cleandoc(string1)))
print('string1 texwrap.dedent=' + repr(textwrap.dedent(string1)))
print('string2 plain=' + repr(string2))
print('string2 inspect.cleandoc=' + repr(inspect.cleandoc(string2)))
print('string2 texwrap.dedent=' + repr(textwrap.dedent(string2)))

Output

string1 plain='\nString\nwith\nno indentation\n       '
string1 inspect.cleandoc='String\nwith\nno indentation\n       '
string1 texwrap.dedent='\nString\nwith\nno indentation\n'
string2 plain='\n        String\n        with\n        indentation\n       '
string2 inspect.cleandoc='String\nwith\nindentation'
string2 texwrap.dedent='\nString\nwith\nindentation\n'
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