27

Every time I run this program, I get this error:

ValueError: list.remove(x): x not in list

I am trying to lower the health of a single alien whenever it is hit by a bolt. That single alien should also be destroyed if its health is <= 0. Similarly, the bolt would also be destroyed. Here is my code:

def manage_collide(bolts, aliens):
    # Check if a bolt collides with any alien(s)
    for b in bolts:
        for a in aliens:
            if b['rect'].colliderect(a['rect']):
                for a in aliens:
                    a['health'] -= 1
                    bolts.remove(b)
                    if a['health'] == 0:
                        aliens.remove(a)
    # Return bolts, aliens dictionaries
    return bolts, aliens

The ValueError happens on the line aliens.remove(a). Just to clarify, both the aliens and bolts are lists of dictionaries.

What am I doing wrong?

2
  • ValueError on which line ?
    – asheeshr
    Commented Jan 2, 2013 at 17:53
  • For future reference, the problem with this code is that I looped over the aliens list twice, which causes some issues when trying to remove from the list. Removing the second 'for a in aliens' would prevent this problem.
    – Remolten
    Commented Feb 23, 2017 at 2:15

6 Answers 6

50

You should not remove items from a list you are looping over. Create a copy instead:

for a in aliens[:]:

and

for b in bolts[:]:

Modifying a list while looping over it, affects the loop:

>>> lst = [1, 2, 3]
>>> for i in lst:
...     print i
...     lst.remove(i)
... 
1
3
>>> lst
[2]

Removing items from a list you are looping over twice makes things a little more complicated still, resulting in a ValueError:

>>> lst = [1, 2, 3]
>>> for i in lst:
...     for a in lst:
...         print i, a, lst
...         lst.remove(i)
... 
1 1 [1, 2, 3]
1 3 [2, 3]
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 4, in <module>
ValueError: list.remove(x): x not in list

When creating a copy of the lists you are modifying at each level of your loops, you avoid the problem:

>>> lst = [1, 2, 3]
>>> for i in lst[:]:
...     for i in lst[:]:
...         print i, lst
...         lst.remove(i)
... 
1 [1, 2, 3]
2 [2, 3]
3 [3]

When you have a collision, you only need to remove the b bolt once, not in the loop where you hurt the aliens. Clean out the aliens separately later:

def manage_collide(bolts, aliens):
    for b in bolts[:]:
        for a in aliens:
            if b['rect'].colliderect(a['rect']) and a['health'] > 0:
                bolts.remove(b)
                for a in aliens:
                    a['health'] -= 1
    for a in aliens[:]:
        if a['health'] <= 0:
            aliens.remove(a)
    return bolts, aliens
4
  • 2
    This doesn't actually answer the OP's question. It's not actually a problem to remove items from a list while iterating over it; it's just that it might produce unexpected results if you don't know how it works.
    – kindall
    Commented Jan 2, 2013 at 17:58
  • It still puts a ValueError on the same line aliens.remove(a) when changing only that line to a copy list.
    – Remolten
    Commented Jan 2, 2013 at 17:59
  • @kindall: It's the double loops that make it all the more fun and can lead to the value error. Commented Jan 2, 2013 at 18:02
  • This still doesn't work for me. Perhaps you could directly modify my code?
    – Remolten
    Commented Jan 3, 2013 at 21:19
4

There is a bug in your code that is causing this. Your code, simplified, looks like:

for b in bolts:
  for a in aliens:
    for a in aliens:
      bolts.remove(b)

That is causing you to loop over aliens multiple times for every entry in b. If the b is removed on the first loop over aliens then, when it loops over it a second time, you will get there error.

A few things to fix. First, change in the inner loop over aliens to use something other than a, so:

for b in bolts:
  for a in aliens:
    for c in aliens:
      if hit:
        bolts.remove(b)

Second, only remove b from bolts once. so:

for b in bolts:
  for a in aliens:
    should_remove = False
    for c in aliens:
      if hit:
        should_remove = True
    if should_remove:
      bolts.remove(b)

There are other issues with this code as well, I think, but that is the cause your main problem. Martijn's post may also help.

2

you can not use list.remove you should use del list[x]

Because when you use remove you must name the deleted item by name not by index, so when the code is operated this error will appear (value error: x is not in list) But when we use del it is ok because we delete item by its index. Whatever the item's name is, using del, the code will operate correctly I hope i cleared the problem and solved it

To know what i mean exactly please try this code Then try it by repacing del with remove and you will know what i mean. The code is below:

aliens = [[4,3,2,1],[4,3,2,1],[4,3,2,1]]
print(aliens)
bolts = [b for b in range(1,30)]
for b in bolts:
    del aliens[0][0]
    print(aliens) 
        if len(aliens[0]) == 0:
            del aliens[0]
    if len(aliens) == 0
                print("you win")
        break
1
  • While this code may solve the question, including an explanation of how and why this solves the problem would really help to improve the quality of your post, and probably result in more up-votes. Remember that you are answering the question for readers in the future, not just the person asking now. Please edit your answer to add explanations and give an indication of what limitations and assumptions apply. Commented Apr 21, 2020 at 0:33
0

Give the bolts a "health" as well, initialized to 1. Then you can do one nested loop to calculate all the damage, and two separate unnested "loops" to remove everything that's "dead". Except, don't do it quite like that, because you still don't want to modify the list that you're looping over. Making a copy is still too complicated. What you really want to do is directly build a new list of only the still "alive" things, and you can do that descriptively with list comprehensions (or as shown here, with filter).

# for example
class Alien:
    # ... other stuff
    def damage(self): self.hp -= 1
    def alive(self): return self.hp > 0

# similarly for Bolt

def collide(an_alien, a_bolt):
    # etc.

def handle_collisions(aliens, bolts):
    for a in aliens:
        for b in bolts:
            if collide(a, b):
                a.damage()
                b.damage()

    return list(filter(Alien.alive, aliens)), list(filter(Bolt.alive, bolts))
0

I think if you replaced for loop with while loop - only in loop in which you remove from list - will solve it

Like this

lis = [1,2,3,4,5,6]
i=0
while i in range(len(lis)) :
    lis. remove(lis[i])
-1

I recommend this:

def manage_collide(bolts, aliens):
    # Check if a bolt collides with any alien(s)
    for b in bolts[:]:
        for a in aliens[:]:
            if b['rect'].colliderect(a['rect']):
                a['health'] -= 1
                bolts.remove(b)
            if a['health'] == 0:
                aliens.remove(a)
    # Return bolts, aliens dictionaries
    return bolts, aliens
1
  • 2
    Please don't post code-only answers. The main audience, future readers, will be grateful to see explained why this answers the question instead of having to infer it from the code. Also, since this is an old, well answered question, please explain how it complements all other answers. Commented Jan 8, 2023 at 15:34

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