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Possible Duplicate:
how to generate different random number in a loop in C++?

This is my code:

 for(i=0;i<10;i++)
 {
    srand ( time(NULL) );
    cout<<time(NULL);
    max=100,min=0;
    for(j=0;j<3;j++)
    {
          cout<<(( (rand() % (max - min + 1)) + min)%5);
    }
 }

Now i get the output:

1357207288 0 1 4

1357207289 0 1 4

1357207290 0 1 4

and so on. I want to get different random numbers each time. How can I achieve this.

marked as duplicate by John Dvorak, jogojapan, Oliver Charlesworth, billz, interjay Jan 3 '13 at 10:44

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • 3
    Move the call to srand() out of the loop. – user529758 Jan 3 '13 at 10:05
  • 3
    Since you say you are using C++, you could take a look at the new pseudo random functionality of C++11, especially the class std::uniform_int_distribution which can be used to generate random numbers in a range. There is an example on how to use it in the link. – Some programmer dude Jan 3 '13 at 10:10
  • 2
    @arjun You have tried moving srand out of the loop and nothing changed? I find that hard to believe. Could you check: 1) Have you removed srand from inside the loop and instead inserted it before the loop, 2) Have you actually recompiled your program after making the change? – jogojapan Jan 3 '13 at 10:20
  • 2
    @jogojapan In the end I find it hard to believe srand being in the loop to be the error, since he puts it out, too, and it is a different number each time (given that he shows the correct output, which might not be the case seeing that his code misses the spaces present in his output, hmmm). – Christian Rau Jan 3 '13 at 10:23
  • 2
    For future reference, when having code and output from that code in a post, please make it the exact code that produces the output. Also please read sscce.org. – Some programmer dude Jan 3 '13 at 10:26
8

The reason you get the same repeatedly is because you initialize it with the same seed each time. That is, since you are performing so few operations, not a single second has passed since the first iteration of the loop to the last one. Hence, time(nullptr) will return the same for each iteration.

To solve this, move srand ( time(NULL) ); outside of the loop, which will mean setting the random seed only once.

 srand ( time(NULL) );
 for(int i=0;i<10;i++)
 {
    cout<<time(NULL);
    int max=100;
    for(int j=0;j<3;j++)
    {
          cout<<(( (rand() % (max - min + 1)) + min)%5);
    }
 }
  • I tried the above code. It still yields the same result as before. – arjun Jan 3 '13 at 10:10
  • Are you sure he gets the same time every iteration (because he puts it out and the numbers look different to me)? – Christian Rau Jan 3 '13 at 10:21
  • 1
    sorry my bad... Its workin now.. Thank You – arjun Jan 3 '13 at 10:23
  • @ChristianRau That's a valid point. In his example data, there is a +1 second increase between calls. The interesting question is: Is his code and data copy-pasted or recreated while writing the post? – Agentlien Jan 3 '13 at 10:23
  • 1
    @Agentlien In the end his code misses the spaces present in his output, which makes me believe he didn't even show the correct output, so you might be right with your answer. – Christian Rau Jan 3 '13 at 10:25
3

You must move srand() outside of your loop, otherwise you receive the same numbers.

srand ( time(NULL) );
for(i=0;i<10;i++)
{
cout<<time(NULL);
max=100,
for(j=0;j<3;j++)
{
      cout<<(( (rand() % (max - min + 1)) + min)%5);
}
}

If you don't you will use the same seed since the time will not change in the nanoseconds your program takes to execute.

  • I tried the above code. Still gives same set of random numbers – arjun Jan 3 '13 at 10:19
  • @arjun What is the variable min in this case? – user1943931 Jan 3 '13 at 10:21
  • Its 0.. And sorry my bad... Its workin now.. Thank You – arjun Jan 3 '13 at 10:25
1
srand(time(NULL));
printf("%d", rand() % 10+1);
for(i=1; i<rand()% max_length; i++) {
  printf("%ld", rand() % 10);
}

This will generate random numbers (also random length of them).

1

You get the same results even with srand() out of the loop because in C the generation algorithm used by rand is guaranteed to only be advanced by calls to this function. In C++, this constraint is relaxed, and a library implementation is allowed to advance the generator on other circumstances (such as calls to elements of <random>). Put a sleep inside the loop and see what happens.

Obviously in plain C this doesn't happen. However, boost libraries offers you some good PRNG functionality. Use it instead of the broken srand(time(NULL));

  • I tried using sleep. Yields the same result :( – arjun Jan 3 '13 at 10:18
  • recompile it in plain C and execute it... it should spit out different numbers. And hey, you posted an output which doesn't seem to be generated by your program! – Gianluca Ghettini Jan 3 '13 at 10:20
  • I don't follow this explanation; of course the state of rand is only advanced by calls to rand; how does this cause the observed problem? – Oliver Charlesworth Jan 3 '13 at 10:25
  • the state of rand is only advanced by calls to rand in C. In C++ this is not guaranteed cplusplus.com/reference/cstdlib/rand – Gianluca Ghettini Jan 3 '13 at 10:27

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