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What are some possible ways to implement a linked list in MATLAB?

Note: I am asking this question for pedagogical value, not practical value. I realize that if you're actually rolling your own linked list in MATLAB, you're probably doing something wrong. However, I'm a TA for a class that is MATLAB-intensive this semester, and my goal in asking this question is to understand the general structure of the language better. As MATLAB's general purpose programming facilities are a bit unusual, I feel a question like this will help me understand them.

3

7 Answers 7

25

MATLAB has access to Java:

>> a=java.util.LinkedList;
>> li=a.listIterator;
>> li.add(2);
>> li.add(int8(77));
>> li.add(77);
>> li.add(boolean(true));
>> li.add('Mr. Bill');
>> li.previous();
>> li.add([1 2 3 4 5]);
>> a

a =

[2.0, 77, 77.0, true, [D@66a917, Mr. Bill]

>> a.get(4)

ans =

     1
     2
     3
     4
     5

The one downside of this approach is because MATLAB doesn't have a way to marshal or serialize arbitrary MATLAB objects into Java, you're limited to floating point numbers, integers (need to cast them in MATLAB using int8 etc.), booleans, strings, arrays, and Java objects.

3
  • you could argue that being able to use java objects inside that linked list pretty much lets you store anything you want.
    – Blindy
    Nov 13, 2009 at 22:15
  • 2
    Well, you can store any Java object. You just can't store some MATLAB objects (like function handles, classes, or structs) in such a list, because they can't be marshalled from MATLAB-land into Java.
    – Jason S
    Nov 13, 2009 at 22:21
  • 1
    I like this, because this taught me that you can access basically any java.util.xyz this way.
    – Herbert
    May 17, 2013 at 13:16
14

The link Lulu suggested in the comments is probably the choice I would make if I were wanting to implement a linked list in MATLAB. However, this approach would stray off into the object-oriented features of MATLAB, which may not be what you want since you mention wanting "to understand the general structure of the language better." As such, you may do better with a simpler example that incorporates general core features of MATLAB programming.

A number of general features have been mentioned in other answers, such as matrices and matrix indexing, creating structures, and using nested functions and function handles. I'll go through an example that makes use of all these features and hopefully gives a nice introduction to a number of key concepts in MATLAB...

Sample code:

Save the code below in a file called linked_list.m on the MATLAB path:

function listObject = linked_list(values)

  data = reshape(values,1,[]);
  listObject = struct('display',@display_list,...
                      'addAfter',@add_element,...
                      'delete',@delete_element);

  function display_list
    %# Displays the data in the list
    disp(data);
  end

  function add_element(values,index)
    %# Adds a set of data values after an index in the list, or at the end
    %#   of the list if the index is larger than the number of list elements
    index = min(index,numel(data));
    data = [data(1:index) reshape(values,1,[]) data(index+1:end)];
  end

  function delete_element(index)
    %# Deletes an element at an index in the list
    data(index) = [];
  end

end

Description:

The function linked_list accepts an arbitrary-sized matrix and first reshapes it into a row vector using the RESHAPE function. This becomes the initial "linked list", stored in the variable data.

Next, a structure is created (using the STRUCT function) which has three elements: display, addAfter, and delete. Each of these fields stores a function handle to one of three functions that is nested within the parent function linked_list. These nested functions are able to access the variable data stored in the parent function.

The listObject structure is returned from linked_list. As long as this structure exists in the workspace, and thus as long as the function handles it contains exist, then the data variable will persist even after the function linked_list returns. We can then invoke the nested functions (using their handles) to modify the variable data. Here's an example...

First, create a linked list "object" and display the contents:

>> listObj = linked_list([1 2 3]);  %# A linked list with three elements
>> listObj.display()  %# Access the `display` field and invoke the function
     1     2     3

Next, add an element "4" after the second list element and display:

>> listObj.addAfter(4,2)  %# Access the `addAfter` field and invoke the function
>> listObj.display()
     1     2     4     3

And finally, delete the second list element and display:

>> listObj.delete(2)  %# Access the `delete` field and invoke the function
>> listObj.display()
     1     4     3

Note how the nested functions add_element and delete_element use matrix indexing to modify the variable data.

You can extend this example to create numerous other nested functions for operating on a linked list, adding new fields to the structure to store their function handles.

2
  • nice solution but for big data could this be a bit slow, matlab needs to resize the data all the time. The class solution could be in my opinion more efficient.
    – jamk
    Mar 18, 2013 at 9:16
  • I agree with jamk, this is a list, not a linked list, and hence it deletions and insertions are O(n). One would like to have a linked list to accept that random access is O(n) and deletions and insertions are O(1).
    – Herbert
    May 17, 2013 at 13:15
6

Creating a linked list in MATLAB isn't actually too bad with the new object oriented structure. I think what most people miss is that most pointer behavior can be achieved in MATLAB through the use of "handle classes".

So, start with a Node class...

classdef Node < handle

       properties
           next
           prev
           value
       end

       methods
            function this = Node(inVal)
                this.value = inVal;
            end
       end
 end 

Then your linked list class would look something like this...

classdef LinkedList < handle

           properties
               firstNode
               lastNode
           end

           methods
               function this = LinkedList(newNode)
                   % Initialize LinkedList with newNode
                   this.firstNode = newNode;
                   this.lastNode = newNode;
               end
               function addNode(this,newNode)
                   % Add newNode to the end of the list
                   newNode.prev = this.lastNode;
                   this.lastNode.next = newNode;
                   this.lastNode = newNode;
               end
           end
    end

I threw this together pretty quickly so I don't know if this will work as written. But if you're just interested in what the structure of a MATLAB linked list would look like, I'm sure this is enough to get you started.

The key concept here is the handle superclass. Whenever you create a class of type handle, you get a "pointer" to that class. That pointer can be passed to other functions or classes thus making it possible to have the nodes of the list point to other nodes.

You can find out more about this here.

3

I don't think you (or I) can do dynamic data structures 'in' MATLAB. We have to use MATLAB OO features and MATLAB classes. Since I think that these facilities are really a MATLAB wrapper around Java I make the bold claim that those facilities are outside MATLAB. A matter of semantics, I concede. If you want to do dynamic data structures with MATLAB, you have to use OO and classes, you can't do it with what I think of as the core language, which lacks pointers at the user level.

1
  • I am trying to understand this deeper here. I need a dynamic balanced data-structure and this missing would mean I better choose a better language altogether. Can you clarify "you have to use OO an classes".
    – hhh
    Aug 28, 2013 at 16:27
2

You can try simulating pointers using indices. It is a very awkward way of doing it, but as you said, Matlab is a bit unusual and can't do a "real" linked list.

You can use a Matlab structure consisting of two fields element and next. element would be the element of the list, and next would be the index of the next node. Then you can have a global array of these, representing your "memory". You can define "malloc" function that adds an element to this array and returns its index. Then you have a head index that is the index of the first element in the list, and you can set the next fields appropriately to form a linked list.

If you really want to go crazy, you can also implement a free and do your own "memory management" by keeping track of the used and free nodes.

2

The handle class and its copy-by-reference behavior is the natural way to implement linkage in Matlab.

It is, however, possible to implement a linked list in Matlab without OOP. And an abstract list which does not splice an existing array in the middle to insert a new element -- as complained in this comment.

(Although I do have to use a Matlab data type somehow, and adding new element to an existing Matlab array requires memory allocation somewhere.)

The reason of this availability is that we can model linkage in ways other than pointer/reference. The reason is not closure with nested functions.

I will nevertheless use closure to encapsulate a few persistent variables. At the end, I will include an example to show that closure alone confers no linkage. And so this answer as written is incorrect.

At the end of the day, linked list in Matlab is only an academic exercise. Matlab, aside from aforementioned handle class and classes inheriting from it (called subclasses in Matlab), is purely copy-by-value. Matlab will optimize and automate how copying works under the hood. It will avoid deep copy whenever it can. That is probably the better take-away for OP's question.

The absence of reference in its core functionality is also why linked list is not obvious to make in Matlab.


Example Matlab linked list:
function headNode = makeLinkedList(value)
% value is the value of the initial node
%   for simplicity, we will require initial node; and won't implement insert before head node
% for the purpose of this example, we accommodate only double as value
%   we will also limit max list size to 2^31-1 as opposed to the usual 2^48 in Matlab vectors

m_id2ind=containers.Map('KeyType','int32','ValueType','int32'); % pre R2022b, faster to split than to array value
m_idNext=containers.Map('KeyType','int32','ValueType','int32');

%if exist('value','var') && ~isempty(value)
    m_data=value; % stores value for all nodes
    m_id2ind(1)=1;
    m_idNext(1)=0; % 0 denotes no next node
    m_id=1; % id of head node
    m_endId=1;
%else
%    m_data=double.empty;
%    % not implemented
%end

headNode = struct('value',value,... % note: this field is for convenince; but is access only
                'get',@getValue,...
                'set',@set,...
                'next',@next,...
                'head',struct.empty,...                
                'push_back',@addEnd,...
                'insert',@insert,...
               'deleteAt',@deleteAt,...
               'id',m_id);

    function value=getValue(node)
        if isempty(node)
            warning("Node is empty.")
            value=double.empty;
        else
            value=id2val(node.id);
        end
    end

    function set(node,val)
        if isempty(node)
            warning("Node is empty.")
        else
            m_data(m_id2ind(node.id))=val;
        end
    end

    function nextNode=next(node)
        if m_idNext(node.id)==0
            warning('There is no next node.')
            nextNode=struct.empty;
        else
            nextNode=makeNode(m_idNext(node.id));
        end
    end

    function node=makeNode(id)
        if isKey(m_id2ind,id)
       node=struct('value',id2val(id),... % note: this field is for convenince; but is access only
                    'get',@getValue,...
                    'set',@set,...
                    'next',@next,...
                    'head',headNode,...                
                    'push_back',@addEnd,...
                    'insert',@insertAfter,...
                    'deleteAt',@deleteAt,...
                    'id',id);
        else
            warning('No such node!')
            node=struct.empty;
        end
    end

    function temp=id2val(id)
       temp=m_data(m_id2ind(id));
    end

    function addEnd(value)
        addAfter(value,m_endId);
    end

    function insertAfter(node,value)
        addAfter(value,node.id);
    end

    function addAfter(value,id)
       m_data(end+1)=value;
       temp=numel(m_data);% new id will be new list length
       if (id==m_endId)
           m_idNext(temp)=0;
           m_endId=temp;
       else
           m_idNext(temp)=m_idNext(id);
       end
       m_id2ind(temp)=temp;
       m_idNext(id)=temp;
    end

    function deleteAt(id)
       %not implemented for single linked list
    end
                  
end

With the above .m file, the following runs:

>> clear all % remember to clear all before creating a new list
>> headNode = makeLinkedList(1);
>> headNode.push_back(2);
>> headNode.push_back(3);
>> node2=headNode.next(headNode);
>> node2.get(node2)
ans =
     2
>> node3=node2.next(node2);
>> node3.get(node3)
ans =
     3
>> node4=node3.next(node3);
Warning: There is no next node. 
> In makeLinkedList/next (line 52) 
>> nodeNot4=node3.head.next(node3.head);
>> node2.set(node2,222)
>> nodeNot4.get(nodeNot4)
ans =
   222
>> node2.insertAfter(node2,2.5)
>> node2_5=node2.next(node2);
>> node2_5.get(node2_5)
ans =
    2.5000
>> nodeSomething=node2_5.next(node2_5);
>> nodeSomething.get(nodeSomething)
ans =
     3
>> nodeSomething.next(nodeSomething);
Warning: There is no next node. 
> In makeLinkedList/next (line 52) 

.next(), .get(), .set() etc in the above can take any valid node struct as input -- not limited to itself. Similarly, .push_back(), .insertAfter(), .head etc can be done from any node. But that node needs to be passed in manually because a non-OOP struct in Matlab cannot reference itself implicitly and automatically. It does not have a this pointer or self reference.

In the above example, nodes are given unique IDs, a dictionary is used to map ID to data (index) and to map ID to next ID. (With pre-R2022 containers.Map(), it's more efficient to have 2 dictionaries even though we have the same key and same value type across the two.) So when inserting new node, we simply need to update the relevant next ID. (Double) array was chosen to store the node values (which are doubles) and that is the data type Matlab is designed to work with and be efficient at. As long as no new allocation is required to append an element, insertion is constant time. Matlab automates the management of memory allocation. Since we are not doing array operations on the underlying array, Matlab is unlikely to take extra step to make copies of new contiguous arrays every time there is a resize. Cell array may incur less re-allocation but with some trade-offs.

Since dictionary is used, I am not sure if this solution qualifies as purely functional.


re: closure vs linkage

In short, closure does not confer linkage. Matlab's nested functions have access to variables in parent functions directly -- as long as they are not shadowed by local variables of the same names. But there is no variable passing. And thus there is no pass-by-reference. And thus we can't model linkage with this non-existent referencing.

I did take advantage of closure above to make a few variables persistent and shared, since scope (called workspace in Matlab) being referred to means all variables in the scope will persist. That said, Matlab also has a persistent specifier. Closure is not the only way.

To showcase this distinction, the example below will not work because every time there is passing of previousNode, nextNode, they are passed-by-value. There is no way to access the original struct across function boundaries. And thus, even with nested function and closure, there is no linkage!

function newNode = SOtest01(value,previousNode,nextNode)

if ~exist('previousNode','var') || isempty(previousNode)
   i_prev=m_prev();
else
   i_prev=previousNode;
end

if ~exist('nextNode','var') || isempty(nextNode)
    i_next=m_next();
else
    i_next=nextNode;
end

newNode=struct('value',m_value(),...
                'prev',i_prev,...
                'next',i_next);
    function out=m_value
        out=value;
    end

    function out=m_prev
       out=previousNode; 
    end

    function out=m_next
        out=nextNode;
    end

end
>> newNode=SOtest01(1,[],[]);
>> newNode2=SOtest01(2,newNode,[]);
>> newNode2.prev.value=2;
>> newNode.value
ans =
     1

But we tried to set prev node of node 2 to be have value 2!

0

I have watched a bit the function of gnovice. I think what the most wannts is not a real linked list of C++ (I think you can generate a linked list only with classes in matlab) but just a general object where you can store random matlab arrays. From the sketch of gnovice I have generated the following:

function listObject = listfuncs()

  data = cell(0);
  listObject = struct('display_list',@display_list,'listlength',@listlength,'add_firstelement',@add_firstelement,'add_firstelements',@add_firstelements,'add_lasttelement',@add_lasttelement,...
                        'add_lasttelements',@add_lasttelements,'add_element',@add_element,'add_elements',@add_elements,'set_element',@set_element,'delete_element',@delete_element,'delete_first',@delete_first,...
                        'delete_last',@delete_last,'GET_first',@GET_first,'GET_last',@GET_last,'GET',@GET);

  function display_list
    %# Displays the data in the list
    disp(data);
  end

  function N = listlength
    %# Numbers of elements in list
    N = length(data);
  end

  function add_firstelement(datain)
    %# Add an element first
    data = [datain;data];
  end

  function add_firstelements(datain)
    %# Add many element first
    data = [datain(:);data];
  end

  function add_lasttelement(datain)
    %# Add element last
    data = [data;datain];
  end

  function add_lasttelements(datain)
    %# Add many elements last
    data = [data;datain(:)];
  end


  function add_element(datain,index)
    %# Adds a set of data values after an index in the list, or at the end
    %#   of the list if the index is larger than the number of list elements
    index = min(index,numel(data));
    data = [data(1:index) datain data(index+1:end)];
  end

  function add_elements(datain,index)
    %# Adds a set of data values after an index in the list, or at the end
    %#   of the list if the index is larger than the number of list elements
    index = min(index,numel(data));
    data = [data(1:index) datain(:) data(index+1:end)];
  end

  function set_element(datain,index)
    %# function to just change element at position index
    data{index} = datain;
  end

  function delete_element(index)
    %# Deletes an element at an index in the list
    if (index<=length(data) && index>0)
        data(index) = [];
    end
  end

  function delete_first()
    %# Deletes fisrt element
    data = data(2:end);
  end

  function delete_last()
    %# Deletes fisrt element
    data = data(1:end-1);
  end

  function dataout = GET_first()
    %# get first element
    dataout = data{1};
  end    

  function dataout = GET_last()
    %# get last element
    dataout = data{end};
  end    

  function dataout = GET(index)
    %# get element at index here the cell can be transformed to standard arrays
    dataout = cell2mat(data(index));
  end

end

I use cells as data so I can store random objects. Maybe some of you have some betters ideas

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