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Anyone's got a quick short educational example how to use Neural Networks (nnet in R) for the purpose of prediction? Here is an example, in R, of a time series

T = seq(0,20,length=200)
Y = 1 + 3*cos(4*T+2) +.2*T^2 + rnorm(200)
plot(T,Y,type="l")

Many thanks

David

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    Isn't nnet limited to qualitative variables, i.e., classification problems? You may have more luck with the neuralnet or AMORE packages. Also note that since your function is unbounded, sigmoid transfer functions (not the only choice, but often the default) are unlikely to give a useable result. For time series, to account for autoregression, people typically use recurrent networks, which are much more complicated... – Vincent Zoonekynd Jan 3 '13 at 14:18
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    This isn't a programming question and is better suited to stats.stackexchange.com. – Joshua Ulrich Jan 3 '13 at 14:57
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    Thanks guys, at least you give me some ideas. I have been told Neural Networks can be used to predict "jumpy-seasonal" time series. It's possible to apply a transformation that makes the time series bounded. I'll have a look at stats.stackexchage as well :) – DKK Jan 3 '13 at 15:07
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I think you can use the caret package and specially the train function

This function sets up a grid of tuning parameters for a number 
      of classification and regression routines.
require(quantmod) 
require(nnet)
require(caret)
T = seq(0,20,length=200)
y = 1 + 3*cos(4*T+2) +.2*T^2 + rnorm(200)
dat <- data.frame( y, x1=Lag(y,1), x2=Lag(y,2))
names(dat) <- c('y','x1','x2')
dat <- dat[c(3:200),] #delete first 2 observations
#Fit model
model <- train(y ~ x1+x2 , 
               dat, 
               method='nnet', 
               linout=TRUE, 
               trace = FALSE)
ps <- predict(model, dat)

#Examine results

plot(T,Y,type="l",col = 2)
lines(T[-c(1:2)],ps, col=3)
legend(5, 70, c("y", "pred"), cex=1.5, fill=2:3)

enter image description here

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    Beautiful ! Thanks agstudy. This is irrelevant but, it's a pain to upload all these packages (and their addons), can I ask you if there is a quick way to do it? – DKK Jan 3 '13 at 15:50
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    If you were to predict the value for timne =30, how would you do it? How come you chose x1=Lag(y,1), x2=Lag(y,2), I mean is it specific to this time series? – DKK Jan 3 '13 at 16:00
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    Why painful? only 2 packages! caret and nnet! quantomod for the lag! – agstudy Jan 3 '13 at 16:01
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    @DavidKhireche, try install.packages("caret", dependencies=TRUE) – GSee Jan 3 '13 at 16:31
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    Regarding package dependencies, you definitely consider RStudio. It makes it real simple in ensuring that the needed dependencies are loaded – Ram Narasimhan Jan 3 '13 at 22:29
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The solution proposed by @agstudy is useful, but in-sample fits are not a reliable guide to out-of-sample forecasting accuracy. The gold standard in forecasting accuracy measurement is to use a holdout sample. Remove the last 5 or 10 or 20 observations (depending to the length of the time series) from the training sample, fit your models to the rest of the data, use the fitted models to forecast the holdout sample and simply compare accuracies on the holdout, using Mean Absolute Deviations (MAD) or weighted Mean Absolute Percentage Errors (wMAPEs). So to do this you can change the code above in this way:

require(quantmod) 
require(nnet)
require(caret)
t = seq(0,20,length=200)
y = 1 + 3*cos(4*t+2) +.2*t^2 + rnorm(200)
dat <- data.frame( y, x1=Lag(y,1), x2=Lag(y,2))
names(dat) <- c('y','x1','x2')
train_set <- dat[c(3:185),]
test_set <- dat[c(186:200),]
#Fit model
model <- train(y ~ x1+x2 , 
               train_set, 
               method='nnet', 
               linout=TRUE, 
               trace = FALSE)
ps <- predict(model, test_set)

#Examine results

plot(T,Y,type="l",col = 2)
lines(T[c(186:200)],ps, col=3)
legend(5, 70, c("y", "pred"), cex=1.5, fill=2:3)

This last two lines output the wMAPE of the forecasts from the model

sum(abs(ps-test_set["y"]))/sum(test_set)
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