What is the exact difference between Dijkstra's and Prim's algorithms? I know Prim's will give a MST but the tree generated by Dijkstra will also be a MST. Then what is the exact difference?

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    It's Dijkstra. "ij" is a diphthong (gliding vowel) in Dutch, and it's the one place where "j" isn't a consonant. – user824425 Jan 3 '13 at 17:49
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    any ways you got the question. – anuj pradhan Jan 3 '13 at 17:51
  • The best way to distinguish their difference is read some source code, Dijkstra and Prim. The main difference is here: for Prim graph[u][v] < key[v], and for Dijkstra dist[u]+graph[u][v] < dist[v]. So as you can see from the graphs in those two pages, they are different mainly because of these two lines of code. – JW.ZG Feb 18 '17 at 2:36
  • Possible duplicate of What is the difference between Dijkstra and Prim's algorithm? – e4c5 Apr 28 '17 at 14:48

10 Answers 10

Prim's algorithm constructs a minimum spanning tree for the graph, which is a tree that connects all nodes in the graph and has the least total cost among all trees that connect all the nodes. However, the length of a path between any two nodes in the MST might not be the shortest path between those two nodes in the original graph. MSTs are useful, for example, if you wanted to physically wire up the nodes in the graph to provide electricity to them at the least total cost. It doesn't matter that the path length between two nodes might not be optimal, since all you care about is the fact that they're connected.

Dijkstra's algorithm constructs a shortest path tree starting from some source node. A shortest path tree is a tree that connects all nodes in the graph back to the source node and has the property that the length of any path from the source node to any other node in the graph is minimized. This is useful, for example, if you wanted to build a road network that made it as efficient as possible for everyone to get to some major important landmark. However, the shortest path tree is not guaranteed to be a minimum spanning tree, and the cost of building such a tree could be much larger than the cost of an MST.

Another important difference concerns what types of graphs the algorithms work on. Prim's algorithm works on undirected graphs only, since the concept of an MST assumes that graphs are inherently undirected. (There is something called a "minimum spanning arborescence" for directed graphs, but algorithms to find them are much more complicated). Dijkstra's algorithm will work fine on directed graphs, since shortest path trees can indeed be directed. Additionally, Dijkstra's algorithm does not necessarily yield the correct solution in graphs containing negative edge weights, while Prim's algorithm can handle this.

Hope this helps!

  • The first paragraph makes no sense, man. The question is what's the difference between Dijkstra and Prim, where Dijkstra is not about what you said the length of a path between **any** two nodes, you should just focus why the distance between src node and any other nodes in Prim is not shortest if it is not shortest. I think he must be asking the src node in Prim to any other node. Why did you talk about any two nodes in Prim? That's of course not the shortest. – JW.ZG Feb 18 '17 at 2:17
  • I've cleaned up the wording in the paragraph about Dijkstra's algorithm to clarify that the shortest path tree is only a minimizer for shortest paths originating at the source node. The reason I've structured my answer this was way to illustrate what the algorithms find rather than how they work to show at a higher level why they produce different outcomes and why you wouldn't expect them to be the same. – templatetypedef Feb 18 '17 at 17:18
  • To see why Dijkstra's and Prim's might not return the same thing, consider a radial graph with a center node connected to say 4 other nodes, each with weight 3. Then, imagine that between two of those non-central nodes, there is an edge with weight 4. The shortest path between those two nodes is via the direct connection, but this edge will not be included in the MST. – information_interchange Oct 16 at 5:37

Dijkstra's algorithm doesn't create a MST, it finds the shortest path.

Consider this graph

       5     5
  s *-----*-----* t
     \         /
       -------
         9

The shortest path is 9, while the MST is a different 'path' at 10.

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    Ok thanks ...you cleared a good point to notice. Till now i was considering that the output generated by dijkstra will be a MST but you cleared the doubt with a good example .I can see clearly if i will find a MST using say 'kruskal' then i will get the same path as you mentioned. Thanks a lot – anuj pradhan Jan 3 '13 at 17:57
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    More correctly - The shortest path is 9 ... from s to t. The weight of the graph generated by Dijkstra's algorithm, starting at s, is 14 (5+9). – Dukeling Jan 3 '13 at 18:01
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    @Dukeling - Huh? the weight of the tree/graph in Dijkstra's is meaningless, that's sort of the point.... – dfb Jan 3 '13 at 18:12
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    Very succinctly illustrated! – Ram Narasimhan Jun 2 '14 at 23:55
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    @dfb: Normally we only run Dijkstra's algorithm to get the shortest path between a specific pair of vertices, but in fact you can keep going until all vertices have been visited, and this will give you a "shortest path tree", as templatetypedef's answer explains. – j_random_hacker Dec 12 '14 at 5:57

Prim and Dijkstra algorithm are almost the same, except for the "relax function".

In Prim:

MST-PRIM (G, w, r) {

        for each key ∈ G.V

            u.key = ∞
            u.parent = NIL

        r.key = 0
        Q = G.V
        while (Q ≠ ø)

            u = Extract-Min(Q)
            for each v ∈ G.Adj[u]

                if (v ∈ Q) and w(u,v) < v.key

                    v.parent = u
                    v.key = w(u,v)    <== relax function, Pay attention here

}

In Dijkstra:

Dijkstra (G, w, r) {

        for each key ∈ G.V

            u.key = ∞
            u.parent = NIL

        r.key = 0
        Q = G.V
        while (Q ≠ ø)

            u = Extract-Min(Q)
            for each v ∈ G.Adj[u]

                if (v ∈ Q) and w(u,v) < v.key

                    v.parent = u
                    v.key = w(u,v) + u.key  <== relax function, Pay attention here

}

The only difference is the last line of the code, which is the relax function. The Prim, which searches for the minimum spanning tree, only cares about the minimum of the total edges cover all the vertices. so it looks like: v.key = w(u,v) The Dijkstra, which searches for the minimum path length, so it cares about the edge accumulation. So it looks like :v.key = w(u,v) + u.key

  • At the code level, the other difference is the API. Prim has method edges() to return MST edges, while Dijkstra has distanceTo(v), pathTo(v), which respectively returns distance from source to vertex v, and path from source to vertex v, where s is the vertex your initialize Dijkstra with. – nethsix Apr 21 '16 at 4:12
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    Corollary, initializing Prim with any any source vertex, s returns the same output for edges(), but initialization Dijkstra with different s will return different output for distanceTo(v), pathTo(v). – nethsix Apr 21 '16 at 4:13
  • Does prims allow negative weight? if yes than this is another difference. I read that you can allow negative weights on prim's by adding large positive no. to each value, making it all positive. – Akhil Dad Nov 23 '16 at 1:50

Dijkstra finds the shortest path between it's beginning node and every other node. So in return you get the minimum distance tree from beginning node i.e. you can reach every other node as efficiently as possible.

Prims algorithm gets you the MST for a given graph i.e. a tree that connects all nodes while the sum of all costs is the minimum possible.

To make a story short with a realistic example:

  1. Dijkstra wants to know the shortest path to each destination point by saving traveling time and fuel.
  2. Prim wants to know how to efficiently deploy a train rail system i.e. saving material costs.

Directly from Dijkstra's Algorithm's wikipedia article:

The process that underlies Dijkstra's algorithm is similar to the greedy process used in Prim's algorithm. Prim's purpose is to find a minimum spanning tree that connects all nodes in the graph; Dijkstra is concerned with only two nodes. Prim's does not evaluate the total weight of the path from the starting node, only the individual path.

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    "Dijkstra is concerned with only two nodes" is bunk. – tmyklebu Aug 31 '14 at 6:55

The key difference between the basic algorithms lies in their different edge-selection criteria. Generally, they both use a priority queue for selecting next nodes, but have different criteria to select the adjacent nodes of current processing nodes: Prim's Algorithm requires the next adjacent nodes must be also kept in the queue, while Dijkstra's Algorithm does not:

def dijkstra(g, s):
    q <- make_priority_queue(VERTEX.distance)
    for each vertex v in g.vertex:
        v.distance <- infinite
        v.predecessor ~> nil
        q.add(v)
    s.distance <- 0
    while not q.is_empty:
        u <- q.extract_min()
        for each adjacent vertex v of u:
            ...

def prim(g, s):
    q <- make_priority_queue(VERTEX.distance)
    for each vertex v in g.vertex:
        v.distance <- infinite
        v.predecessor ~> nil
        q.add(v)
    s.distance <- 0
    while not q.is_empty:
        u <- q.extract_min()
        for each adjacent vertex v of u:
            if v in q and weight(u, v) < v.distance:// <-------selection--------
            ...

The calculations of vertex.distance are the second different point.

Dijkstras algorithm is used only to find shortest path.

In Minimum Spanning tree(Prim's or Kruskal's algorithm) you get minimum egdes with minimum edge value.

For example:- Consider a situation where you wan't to create a huge network for which u will be requiring a large number of wires so these counting of wire can be done using Minimum Spanning Tree(Prim's or Kruskal's algorithm) (i.e it will give you minimum number of wires to create huge wired network connection with minimum cost).

Whereas "Dijkstras algorithm" will be used to get the shortest path between two nodes while connecting any nodes with each other.

@templatetypedef has covered difference between MST and shortest path. I've covered the algorithm difference in another So answer by demonstrating that both can be implemented using same generic algorithm that takes one more parameter as input: function f(u,v). The difference between Prim and Dijkstra's algorithm is simply which f(u,v) you use.

At the code level, the other difference is the API.

You initialize Prim with a source vertex, s, i.e., Prim.new(s); s can be any vertex, and regardless of s, the end result, which are the edges of the minimum spanning tree (MST) are the same. To get the MST edges, we call the method edges().

You initialize Dijkstra with a source vertex, s, i.e., Dijkstra.new(s) that you want to get shortest path/distance to all other vertices. The end results, which are the shortest path/distance from s to all other vertices; are different depending on the s. To get the shortest paths/distances from s to any vertex, v, we call the methods distanceTo(v) and pathTo(v) respectively.

The first distinction is that Dijkstra’s algorithm solves a different problem than Kruskal and Prim. Dijkstra solves the shortest path problem (from a specified node), while Kruskal and Prim finds a minimum-cost spanning tree. The following is a modified form of a description I wrote at this page: Graph algorithms.

For any graph, a spanning tree is a collection of edges sufficient to provide exactly one path between every pair of vertices. This restriction means that there can be no circuits formed by the chosen edges.

A minimum-cost spanning tree is one which has the smallest possible total weight (where weight represents cost or distance). There might be more than one such tree, but Prim and Kruskal are both guaranteed to find one of them.

For a specified vertex (say X), the shortest path tree is a spanning tree such that the path from X to any other vertex is as short as possible (i.e., has the minimum possible weight).

Prim and Dijkstra "grow" the tree out from a starting vertex. In other words, they have a "local" focus; at each step, we only consider those edges adjacent to previously chosen vertices, choosing the cheapest option which satisfies our needs. Meanwhile, Kruskal is a "global" algorithm, meaning that each edge is (greedily) chosen from the entire graph. (Actually, Dijkstra might be viewed as having some global aspect, as noted below.)

To find a minimum-cost spanning tree:

Kruskal (global approach): At each step, choose the cheapest available edge anywhere which does not violate the goal of creating a spanning tree. Prim (local approach): Choose a starting vertex. At each successive step, choose the cheapest available edge attached to any previously chosen vertex which does not violate the goal of creating a spanning tree. To find a shortest-path spanning tree:

Dijkstra: At each step, choose the edge attached to any previously chosen vertex (the local aspect) which makes the total distance from the starting vertex (the global aspect) as small as possible, and does not violate the goal of creating a spanning tree.

Minimum-cost trees and shortest-path trees are easily confused, as are the Prim and Dijkstra algorithms that solve them. Both algorithms "grow out" from the starting vertex, at each step choosing an edge which connects a vertex Y which is in the tree to a vertex Z which is not. However, while Prim chooses the cheapest such edge, Dijkstra chooses the edge which results in the shortest path from X to Z.

A simple illustration is helpful to understand the difference between these algorithms and the trees they produce. In the graph below, starting from the vertex A, both Prim and Dijkstra begin by choosing edge AB, and then adding edge BD. Here is where the two algorithms diverge: Prim completes the tree by adding edge DC, while Dijkstra adds either AC or BC, because paths A-C and A-B-C (both with total distance 30) are shorter than path A-B-D-C (total distance 31).

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