5

According to MSDN:

You can use the AttachedToParent option to express structured task parallelism, because the parent task implicitly waits for all child tasks to finish.

So I have this code:

public async Task<int> GetIntAsync()
{
    var childTask = Task.Factory.StartNew(async () =>
    {
        await Task.Delay(1000);
    },TaskCreationOptions.AttachedToParent);

    return 1;
}

public async Task<ActionResult> Index()
{
    var watch = Stopwatch.StartNew();
    var task = GetIntAsync();
    var result = await task;
    var time = watch.ElapsedMilliseconds;

    return View();  
}

I would like to know why the time is 0 and not 1000.

  • 2
    You should never use StartNew() with async methods, because it doesn't support them well. Instead, you should use Task.Run() (although that doesn't support AttachedToParent). – svick Jan 4 '13 at 14:56
5

Code that uses the Task-based Asynchronous Pattern (TAP) does not normally use AttachedToParent. AttachedToParent was part of the design of the Task Parallel Library (TPL). Both the TPL and TAP share the same Task type, but there are many TPL members that should be avoided in TAP code.

In TAP, you can support the notion of "parent" and "child" async methods by having the "parent" async method await the task returned from the "child" async method:

public async Task<int> GetIntAsync()
{
  var childTask = Task.Run(() =>
  {
    ...
    await Task.Delay(1000);
    ...
  });
  ...

  await childTask;
  return 1;
}
  • What if you have an unbounded numbers of child tasks? Like listening for tcp clients and creating a new task for each of them. It doesn't make sense to store all those tasks in a collection. Otherwise you would need to create another task just to remove finished tasks to avoid the collection to explode; very ugly solution. – drowa Dec 10 '14 at 8:00
  • @drowa: Socket connections are independent, so there's no natural parent/child relationship there. Usually if you have a situation where there's a task you want to act as "parent" with a dynamic number of "children", that indicates that the underlying abstraction is actually a stream. Streams are more naturally handled with a stream-based approach, such as Rx or TPL Dataflow (both of which interoperate nicely with async). – Stephen Cleary Dec 10 '14 at 14:15
  • @Stephan Cleary: The problem is that a task is usually, if not always, executed by background threads. For example, I'm implementing a Windows service which listens TCP clients. The service creates a task for each client. How could we make sure the client tasks will terminate nicely when the service is stopping? Note, like in the question here, both types of task, listening (parent) and client (child), are implemented with async delegates. – drowa Dec 10 '14 at 19:54
  • 1
    @drowa: The statement a task is usually, if not always, executed by background threads is incorrect. Tasks represent a future event completing. While it's possible that they could represent work done on the thread pool (Task.Run), the vast majority of tasks represent I/O-bound work and do not "run" anywhere. To implement cooperative shutdown, use CancellationTokens. – Stephen Cleary Dec 10 '14 at 20:18
  • 1
    @Stephan Cleary: I will use a list. But my point is that it would be cleaner if I could use AttachedToParent. I suspect it would be more efficient too, since it seems this feature is implemented internally by a simple counter. Another thing that seems natural for me would be the ability to create "foreground" tasks that wouldn't be interrupted by the AppDomain during its unloading. Anyway, thanks for your comments. – drowa Dec 10 '14 at 22:14
4

AttachedToParent only attaches to tasks that are scheduled. The Task returned by your async method is not scheduled, but rather comes (implicitly) from a TaskCompletionSource

1

This is a solution that would work for a dynamic number of child tasks.

Using a list would be, in general, naive.

public async Task<int> GetIntAsync()
{
    var childTasks = new List<Task>();

    while (...)
    {
        ...
        childTasks.Add(Task.Run(...));
        ...
    }

    await Task.WhenAll(childTasks);

    return 1;
}

For example, if the child tasks are short lived and, new ones are created rapidly and unboundedly, then the list would overflow.

Instead, we can use just one task.

public async Task<int> GetIntAsync()
{
    var childrenTask = Task.WhenAll();

    while (...)
    {
        ...
        childrenTask = Task.WhenAll(Task.Run(...), childrenTask);
        ...
    }

    await childrenTask;

    return 1;
}

Note this is a linked list of tasks which shrinks as soon as a task completes.

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