21

I want to write a String to a Unicode file. My code in Java is:

public static boolean saveStringToFile(String fileName, String text) {
    BufferedWriter out = null;
    boolean result = true;
    try {
        File f = new File(fileName);
        out = new BufferedWriter(new OutputStreamWriter(
                new FileOutputStream(f), "UTF-8"));
        out.write(text);
        out.flush();
    } catch (Exception ex) {
        result = false;
    } finally {
        if (out != null)
            try {
                out.close();
            } catch (IOException e) {
                // nothing to do! couldn't close
            }
    }

    return result;
}

Update

Now compare it to C#:

    private static bool SaveStringToFile(string fileName, string text)
    {
        using (StreamWriter writer = new StreamWriter(fileName))
        {
            writer.Write(text);
        }
    }

or even try..catch form would be:

    private static bool SaveStringToFile(string fileName, string text)
    {
        StreamWriter writer = new StreamWriter(fileName);
        try
        {
            writer.Write(text);
        }catch (Exception ex)
        {
            return false;
        }
        finally
        {
            if (writer != null)
                writer.Dispose();
        }
    }

Maybe it's because I'm from the C# and .Net world. But is this the right way to write a String to a file? It's just too much code for such simple task. In C#, I would say to just out.close(); and that was it but it seems a bit strange to add a try..catch inside a finally statement. I added the finally statement to close the file (resource) no matter what happens. To avoid using too much resource. Is this the right way in Java? If so, why close throws exception?

  • Although I'm a rusty in java, I think the code is correct. Catching out.Close(); isn't mandatory, but it's better to catch every possible error. – jAC Jan 4 '13 at 11:21
  • @TimSchmelter Sorry for confusion. The code is in Java, not c#. I edited my question. – Alireza Noori Jan 4 '13 at 11:22
  • 2
    In c# it's even more simple than you mentioned. File.WriteAllText(path, text); and that's it – VladL Jan 4 '13 at 11:28
  • 4
    Oh, Java. So many lines for so few things... – MikeTheLiar Jan 4 '13 at 13:33
  • @mikeTheLiar Unfortunately I have to work with Java on my project. I just love C#. The Unicode support for Java is just awful :( – Alireza Noori Jan 4 '13 at 16:45
17

You are correct in that you need to call the close() in the finally block and you also need to wrap this is a try/catch

Generally you will write a utility method in you project or use a utility method from a library like http://commons.apache.org/io/apidocs/org/apache/commons/io/IOUtils.html#closeQuietly(java.io.Closeable) to closeQuietly .i.e. ignore any throw exception from the close().

On an additional note Java 7 has added support for try with resources which removes the need to manually close the resouce - http://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/essential/exceptions/tryResourceClose.html

  • Thanks. This answer is more complete than @codeMan's answer. Clearly, I was looking for something like try with resources in Java 7. – Alireza Noori Jan 4 '13 at 11:48
  • +1 for the java 7 point. – TechSpellBound Jan 4 '13 at 14:03
3

Yes, There is nothing strange about Try catch inside finally() in java. close() may throw IoException for various reasons, thats why it has to enclosed by try catch blocks. There is an improved solution to this problem of yours, in the latest java SE 7 Try with resources

  • My problem is that this kind of programming, could result in extremely complex codes. As you can see such small amount of work has produced a lot of noise. Suppose I had 2 resources, that would add 10 lines more code to this! I can argue that inside finally there should be no calls to functions that could throw some exceptions. – Alireza Noori Jan 4 '13 at 11:33
  • Yes I agree, Hence there is a improved solution to this problem in the latest java SE 7 Try Catch with resources. – codeMan Jan 4 '13 at 11:36
  • Aha! That is exactly what I was looking for. Thanks for that. – Alireza Noori Jan 4 '13 at 11:37
  • please add this link to your answer. Most people don't read comments. – Alireza Noori Jan 4 '13 at 11:39
  • you are welcome! Edited to include the link! :) – codeMan Jan 4 '13 at 11:42
2

The Java equivalent to the using statement is the try-with-resources statement added in Java 7:

public static void saveStringToFile(String fileName, String text) throws IOException {
    try (Writer w = new OutputStreamWriter(new FileOutputStream(fileName), "UTF-8")) {
        w.write(text);
    }
}

The try-with-resources will automatically close the stream (which implicity flushes it), and throw any exceptions encountered when doing so.

A BufferedWriter is not necessary if you do a single call to write anyway (its purpose is to combine several writes to the underlying stream to reduce the number of system calls, thereby improving performance).

If you insist on handling errors by returning false, you can add a catch clause:

public static boolean saveStringToFile(String fileName, String text) {
    try (Writer w = new OutputStreamWriter(new FileOutputStream(fileName), "UTF-8")) {
        w.write(text);
        return true;
    } catch (IOException e) {
        return false;
    }
}
  • Thank you very much for both codes. I didn't know this about BufferedWriter. I'll modify my code. (BTW, +1 for using its in its correct form. Usually people misuse it) – Alireza Noori Jan 4 '13 at 16:50
1

This should do the trick. If you want to manage exception with complex behavior - then create StreamWriter

public static bool saveStringToFile(String fileName, String text) 
{
    try
    {
        File.WriteAllText(fileName, text, Encoding.UTF8);
    }
    catch (IOException exp)
    {
        return false;
    }
    return true;
}
  • Is that Java or C#? – VladL Jan 4 '13 at 11:30
  • This code is in C#. I'm looking for something like this in Java – Alireza Noori Jan 4 '13 at 11:30
  • this is C#, sorry, I misunderstood you. I thought your question was to write C# code based on Java. I will update my answer – Ilya Ivanov Jan 4 '13 at 11:32
  • Thanks. No need. My question was about the structure of language design. – Alireza Noori Jan 4 '13 at 11:46
  • ok, I see. @bstick12 gave a good answer. Java indeed sometimes throws a little bit more work on developers, as to be compared with C#. hope java developers won't pursuit me for such words – Ilya Ivanov Jan 4 '13 at 11:50
0

So, what is the question? There is no right or wrong way. Can close even throw an IO Exception ? What do you do then? I generally like non rethrowing of any sort not at all.

The problem is - you just swallow an IO Exception on Close - good. CAN you live with that blowing? If not you have a problem, if yes - nothing wrong.

I never did that, but - again, that depends on your business case.

  • What would anyone do? I couldn't close a file. There's nothing I can do (except for trying again and again and again...). I'd say the close method should be implemented in a way that it would just release the handle. What did .net people do? That's the right way. – Alireza Noori Jan 4 '13 at 11:36
  • I was just curious that maybe I'm doing something wrong. Fortunately @codeMan's link showed that java people are working to fix this. – Alireza Noori Jan 4 '13 at 11:38
  • I am not sure there is a right way. It depends on your business side. – TomTom Jan 4 '13 at 11:42
0
arch = new File("path + name");
arch.createNewFile();
FileOutputStream fos = new FileOutputStream(arch);
fos.write("ur text");
fos.close();

my way.

  • You catch no exception here. I want to just get false instead of Exception (error handling). – Alireza Noori Jan 4 '13 at 11:31
  • 1
    @AlirezaNoori Why do you want a boolean given you will have to check this or risk ignoring it? You are better off throwing the exception so it will be checked. +1 – Peter Lawrey Jan 4 '13 at 11:35
0

The best way to avoid that is putting your out.close() after out.flush() and the process is automatically handled if the close fails. Or use this is better (what I am using) :

File file = ...
   OutputStream out = null;
   try {
     out = new BufferedOutputStream(new FileOutputStream(file));
     ...
    finally {
     if (out != null) {
       out.close();
     }
   }
 }
  • In that case, if the flush throws an Exception, would the file be closed then? – Alireza Noori Jan 4 '13 at 11:28
0

If you want a minimum of code you can use FileUtils.writeStringToFile

FileUtils.writeStringToFile(new File(fileName), text);

and I wouldn't use boolean as it rarely a good idea to ignore either the fact an error occured or the reason it occured which is in the message of the exception. Using a checked Exception ensures the caller will always deal with such error correctly and can log meaningful error messages as to why.

To save the file using a specific CharSet

try {
    FileUtils.writeStringToFile(new File(fileName), text, "UTF-8");
} catch(IOException ioe) {
    Logger.getLogger(getClass()).log(Level.WARNING, "Failed to write to " + fileName, ioe);
}
  • In my code, a write failure would just be ignored. It doesn't hurt my project to use error handling in this particular case. In addition the error would be logged (which I removed to simplify the code in the question). – Alireza Noori Jan 4 '13 at 11:42
  • BTW, will this save the String in UTF-8? – Alireza Noori Jan 4 '13 at 11:42
  • It will be UTF-8 if that is you default character encoding. If you specific want UTF-8 you can specifiy it. – Peter Lawrey Jan 4 '13 at 11:48
  • 1
    dunno which is the logger used but the std one j.u.l.Level doesn't have WARN constant. It's WARNING :) – bestsss Jan 8 '13 at 17:20

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