20

Possible Duplicate:
Should I use != or <> for not equal in TSQL?

If I use a simple table such as :

create table test ( a int );
insert into test values ( 1 ) , ( 2 ) , ( 2 ) , ( 3 );
select * from test where a <> 2;
select * from test where a != 2;

Both give me :

+------+
| a    |
+------+
|    1 |
|    3 |
+------+
2 rows in set (0.00 sec)

So what is the difference between <> and != mysql operators ?

marked as duplicate by Taryn, S.L. Barth, laurent, Ragunath Jawahar, Charles Menguy Jan 4 '13 at 16:59

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  • I can't find any documentation explicitly saying so, but they are synonymous. – vcsjones Jan 4 '13 at 15:03
15

They are both exactly the same. See the documentation.

http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/comparison-operators.html#operator_not-equal

  • 1
    Thank you, strange notation. Just seen that on a coworker code and just got stuck. – Alain Tiemblo Jan 4 '13 at 15:06
  • Yeah, while I use C-based languages mainly I tend to use <> even though != feels more natural to me. <> just seems right for any SQL representation. – anothershrubery Jan 4 '13 at 15:07
22

<> should be preferred, all things being equal, since it accords with the sql standard and is technically more portable...

!= is non-standard, but most db's implement it.

sql:2008 grammar:

<not equals operator> ::=
  <>
  • 1
    why is it technically more portable? – Dennis Jun 19 '17 at 20:29
  • @Dennis I guess because it is sql standard. – Kodos Johnson Jun 14 '18 at 20:11
  • @Dennis it should be more compatible to use <> and easily to transplant the query in different RDBMS. so it's considering portable? – mingchau May 5 at 3:35
5

No difference. <> is sql standard, != non-standard.

1

Nothing. Simply two different ways of writing the same thing

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