18

I would like to have a variable (or #define) in C++ source that will increment each time I use Qt Creator to build source code. Is there any way I can do this, perhaps some Qt Creator plugin or similar? If there is a way to do it if I use "make" on command line to build?

18

In your .pro file, you can create a variable that contains the results of a command-line program. You can then use that to create a define.

BUILDNO = $$(command_to_get_the_build_number)
DEFINES += BUILD=$${BUILDNO}

If you just want a simple incrementing number, you could use a pretty simple script:

#!/bin/bash
number=`cat build_number`
let number += 1
echo "$number" | tee build_number #<-- output and save the number back to file

I should note that this would cause the build number to increment every time you build, and also increment if you try to build but it fails. A better way is to get a build number based on the state of the code, and many version control tools can get you a text string for that, if not a number.

  • 1
    I really want increment on each build not each repository commit. This answers my question. – user69650 Sep 13 '09 at 18:49
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    I'm using my own scheme with Qt+QMake: indiocolifax86.wordpress.com/2010/05/22/… – Hernán Jul 15 '10 at 15:33
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    sexy .bat version :) @echo off set /p var= <ver.txt set /a var= %var%+1 echo %var% >ver.txt (just create ver.txt with 0 in it) – argh Nov 17 '10 at 16:05
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    shouldn't that be $$system(./command_to_get_the_build_number)? – Marc Mutz - mmutz May 8 '11 at 14:48
  • @mmutz: It depends on what you want. Off the top of my head, if you use $$system, it will only execute when qmake runs to generate the Makefile. On the other hand, if you do what I did, qmake will embed the command in the Makefile, to be run whenever make is run. – Caleb Huitt - cjhuitt May 8 '11 at 17:27
7

As I wrote before after some testing I found that the original solution has a problem since the version number is not updated every time a new build is done. In a lot of cases I had edited a source file, run the build, but still got the same build number ... The building process just decided that nothing was changed and skipped the step which would have updated the build number. I first attempted to find a way to force that step, but couldn't figure it out. Finally I decided to go a different way. Now I use the script to generate a header file build_number.h which contains a #define BUILD with the updated number behind. So Calebs script is now a bit modified (build_number.sh) :

#!/bin/bash
number=`cat build_number`
let number++
echo "$number" | tee build_number #<-- output and save the number back to file
echo "#define BUILD ""$number" | tee ../MyProject/build_number.h

The incrementing number is still stored within a file called build_number. I could have avoided a third file by parsing the generated header-file for the number, but decided against it. Note that the script and the generated header are located in the projects directory while the build_number file is in the build directory. That's not perfect, but I can live with it.

In order to put things together there are now some more things to do. First the generated header-file needs to be added to the project in the Qt Designer ... Right-click on Header-Files and "Add existing file". Second, it has to be included in the C++-file where the BUILD define inside is accessed ... #include "build_number.h" ... and last but not least some additions have to be made to the project file (MyProject.pro). Note that I deleted the stuff from Calebs solution, so we start from scratch here :

build_nr.commands = ../MyProject/build_number.sh
build_nr.depends = FORCE
QMAKE_EXTRA_TARGETS += build_nr
PRE_TARGETDEPS += build_nr

These lines (I put them before the HEADERS section) force the execution of the script, which reads the last build number from build_number, increments it, writes it back and also generates an updated version of the build_number.h file. Since that's part of the source of the project the new value gets linked into the code every time.

There's one thing to mention - now the building process is never at the opinion that nothing has changed. So even if you leave your code unchanged a new run of make will generate a new version number and build a new binary. The old solution left the number when code changed, this new solution forces a new build even when the source is unchanged, since I force a change in that one header file. One would have prefered something in between but since the header is only included in one place the rebuild is very fast and doesn't hurt much. But still, if somebody knows how to get the best of both worlds please advise. At least now I'll not have two different binaries with the same version number.

7

The Windows equivalent for Joerg Beutel's improved solution https://stackoverflow.com/a/5967447/1619432:

.pro:

build_nr.commands = build_inc.bat
build_nr.depends = FORCE
QMAKE_EXTRA_TARGETS += build_nr
PRE_TARGETDEPS += build_nr

HEADERS  += build.h

build_inc.bat:

@echo off 
set /p var= <build.txt 
set /a var= %var%+1 
echo %var% >build.txt
echo #define BUILD %var% >build.h
echo %var%

Usage

#include "build.h"
...
qDebug() << "Build number:" << BUILD;
4

Caleb's suggestion is great, but didn't work "out of the box" in my case. I got some errors instead and it took some reading to fix them. The changes are very minor. I was using Qt 4.7 on Ubuntu Linux ... The first change, if you can believe it, was in the shell script to go from let number += 1 to let number++ ... I normally use/program Windoze, so I can't explain that, but when I run the script from a command line (shell prompt) in the original case I get errors reported, in the changed case all goes well and incrementing numbers are returned ...

Since it's not completely reported by Caleb - I used build_number.sh as the name of the shell script and made another file with the name build_number (without .sh) and put just a zero inside, nothing else.

The last and most obnoxious bug was fixed by replacing BUILDNO = $$(command_to_get_the_build_number) with BUILDNO = $$system(./build_number.sh) in the Qt project file. Note the system after $$ and the required ./ in front of the file name. The later is elementary for a regular Linux user, but not as much so for a Windows user.

Hope this makes it more straight forward for people new to all this, like myself. You can read more in the Qt Designer Help section if you seek for qmake, including the function reference, Advanced Use etc.

Oh, one last word ... I also had to change DEFINES += -DBUILD=$${BUILDNO} to DEFINES += BUILD=$${BUILDNO}, so the -D is gone. Inside your C++ code you would use BUILD as if you had written #define BUILD 1234 at the top of your file.

  • That's a good note about the -D. I'll edit my answer to fix it. – Caleb Huitt - cjhuitt May 8 '11 at 17:29
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    After some testing it's now clear that this solution is not perfect since in a lot of cases the qmake step is not executed during build because the "configuration has not changed". qmake builds the Makefile which is used to build the application and for that it also interpretes what we wrote into the *.pro file, but only once. In the Makefile we find -DBUILD 29 instead of BUILD build_number.sh ... It's no solution to write something in the Makefile itself since it's overwritten when qmake is executed. You can execute qmake from the Designer/Build menu, but it's not automatic. Solution needed ! – Joerg Beutel May 8 '11 at 21:57
1

Here's a solution for Win7 I came up with based on handle's solution. This solution also makes Windows give yer version # when you right-click yer target, and choose Properties | Details. It works in Win7, and probably most earlier versions.

Ok, you make yer build_inc.bat:

@echo off
copy /b myapp.rc +,,
set /p var= <build.txt 
set /a var= %var%+1 
echo %var% >build.txt
echo #define BUILD %var% >build.h

and put it in yer proj folder. (copy /b myapp.rc +,, is inscrutable Microsoft-eese for "touch" - to update a file's time-stamp.) So far, so good - so what?!!

This part is optional, if you don't need the version encoded into the binary. Create a .rc file, e.g.:

#include "build.h"

1 VERSIONINFO
FILEFLAGS 32
FILEVERSION 1, 0, BUILD, 0
PRODUCTVERSION 1, 0, BUILD, 0
FILEOS 4
FILETYPE 1

{
    BLOCK "StringFileInfo"
    {
        BLOCK "040904B0"
        {
            VALUE "FileDescription", "program"
            VALUE "OriginalFilename", "program.exe"
            VALUE "CompanyName", "you"
            VALUE "FileVersion", "Release"
            VALUE "LegalCopyright", "Copyright (c) 2016, you, fool!"
            VALUE "ProductName", "Yer proggie"
            VALUE "ProductVersion", "Release"
        }
    }
    BLOCK "VarFileInfo"
    {
        VALUE "Translation", 0x0409, 0x04B0
    }
}

A more full-blown version is available here: Versioning DLLs. BTW: It won't work without the VarFileInfo block. This .rc is used for stuff like right-clicking and getting this info in Properties | Details. I have both a M$ .rc file for this info and the app icon, and add other resources in Qt Creator under Resources.

Not so optional: Here's the part I've spent some time hacking to find. In Qt Creator, with yer proj opened, click the little computer icon and put it in release mode. Click on "Projects". Click on "Add Build Step", choose Custom Process Step, and click the hat icon "^" until it is at the top of the list. Say you've named yer .rc, "myapp.rc". Make tha build step read as follows:

Command: cmd.exe
Arguments:/c build_inc.bat
Working Directory: %{CurrentProject:Path}

While a qmake-based version might work well from the command line or command line tools called from an IDE, in Qt Creator, the build steps are preferable, I believe. Qt Creator doesn't actually run qmake for each build; but build steps are run every build.

Now, add this to yer .pro file:

RC_FILE +=  myapp.rc

Also, add myapp.rc to yer proj. It'll show up under "Other Files".

Now rebuild. Every rebuild will trigger a touch of the resource file, thereby running "rc" every time. Otherwise, the build number won't get encoded into the binary right. It runs quickly for me. Every rebuild will increment this number. I've only bothered to add them to the "Release" build; so debug builds don't increment this. They'll just use the number of the last build. You will need to run it once in release to avoid an error, I believe. This works without separately re-running qmake each time in Qt Creator; and gives you a different build number each time. It doesn't trigger any other recompiles. You have the overhead of running "rc" and linking each time, as opposed to doing nothing if everything is up to date; but OTOH, I do it for release builds only; you almost always link for a build or run anyway; and again, "rc" is fast.

Optional: You can move the BUILD preprocessor symbol wherever you want in yer vers. #. (Note: You can also add yer app icon with something like this:

IDI_ICON1 ICON DISCARDABLE "Icons/myicon.ico"

This makes it show up in Explorer even before the file is run.)

You can also add "build.h" to yer proj formally in Qt Creator, include it in a file you want to use the build # in, and use it as a string, e.g. with:

#include <QDebug>
#include "build.h"

#define STR_EXPAND(tok) #tok
#define STR(tok) STR_EXPAND(tok)

qDebug() << QString("(build ")+STR(BUILD)+")";

I just noticed a side effect: If you do it this way, it will rebuild before every run in Release. I guess that's not too bad a price to pay. I guess I can always copy the runtimes into the release directory, and run it from Explorer; or just put up with the extra compile of my about.h, the run of "rc" and the link with each run in release. For that matter, I could just create an external tool to run it with a keyboard shortcut. I'm certainly open to any improvements on this. For the time being, I'm not bothering, as just compiling "about.cpp", running "rc" and linking with every run doesn't take very long. Still, people: automatic build numbers!

☮!

Edit: Optional: In order to get it to increment the build number only when you build or rebuild your project, but not when you run it (even though a build will always occur in Release), go to Projects | Build and Run | Run, click "Add a Deploy Step" and choose "Custom Process Step":

Command: cmd.exe
Arguments: /c if exist build.old copy /y build.old build.txt
Working Directory: %{CurrentProject:Path}

Then, add

copy /y build.txt build.old

after @echo off in the .bat file. It is even possible, although involved, to make custom new project templates: Extending Qt Creator Manual

Edit: I've now made it work with one, not two, custom build steps.

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