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I am trying to follow along with the official Check tutorial, but it requires a working knowledge of Autotools, which I don't have. I was hoping just to write a couple quick tests, and I'm finding this tutorial overwhelming. It relies on a lot of magic in Autoconf, Automake, and some Check macros. It doesn't explain how Check actually works so that I could build tests by hand.

How can I use Check without Autotools?

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  • I edited the question, I think it can be reopened now but it's not clear to me how to do that. Aug 25, 2020 at 20:17
  • 1
    @MerlijnSebrechts It requires enough reputation (or being the original poster). I agree, so voted to reopen now.
    – hyde
    Aug 26, 2020 at 4:09
  • 1
    Thanks for the cleanup @MerlijnSebrechts. I've also voted to reopen. Aug 26, 2020 at 18:19

2 Answers 2

46

You certainly don't need to learn autotools to use Check in small projects. Let's say our main() is in main.c and our implementation.c have a function that sums 2 ints. (implementation.h contains just the function prototype)

#include "implementation.h"

int sum(int a, int b) {

    return a + b;
}

You can write a test like so:

#include "implementation.h"

#test sum2test
    fail_unless(sum(3, 2) == 5, "sum function borked");
    fail_unless(sum(-3, 2) == -1, "sum function borked");
    fail_unless(sum(3, -2) == 1, "sum function borked");
    fail_unless(sum(-3, -2) == -5, "sum function borked");

Save the file in implementation-test.check (you can pick any name / extension you want, but stay with those if you want to follow my guide) and then run the included awk script that comes with Check. You don't even have to bother with the boilerplate code for the check framework! (for more details man checkmk)

checkmk implementation-test.check >implementation-test.c

The output will be the following:

/*
 * DO NOT EDIT THIS FILE. Generated by checkmk.
 * Edit the original source file "implementation-test.check" instead.
 */

#include <check.h>

#line 1 "implementation-test.check"
#include "implementation.h"

START_TEST(sum2test)
{
#line 4
    fail_unless(sum(3, 2) == 5, "sum function borked");
    fail_unless(sum(-3, 2) == -1, "sum function borked");
    fail_unless(sum(3, -2) == 1, "sum function borked");
    fail_unless(sum(-3, -2) == -5, "sum function borked");
}
END_TEST

int main(void)
{
    Suite *s1 = suite_create("Core");
    TCase *tc1_1 = tcase_create("Core");
    SRunner *sr = srunner_create(s1);
    int nf;

    suite_add_tcase(s1, tc1_1);
    tcase_add_test(tc1_1, sum2test);

    srunner_run_all(sr, CK_ENV);
    nf = srunner_ntests_failed(sr);
    srunner_free(sr);

    return nf == 0 ? 0 : 1;
}

Then just include -lcheck when you compile to get the check library linked in and run the program!

gcc -Wall -o sum2ints-test implementation.c implementation-test.c -lcheck
./sum2ints

Below is a simple makefile to get you started. Save it in sum2ints.makefile and then to build the implementation.c along with main, run:

make -f sum2ints.makefile

To build & run the implementation.c with our implementation-test.c that got created from checkmk, run:

make -f sum2ints.makefile test

-

CFLAGS=-Wall
LIBS=-lcheck

all: sum2ints

sum2ints: main.o implementation.o
gcc -o sum2ints main.o implementation.o

main.o: main.c implementation.h
gcc $(CFLAGS) -c main.c

implementation.o: implementation.c implementation.h
gcc $(CFLAGS) -c implementation.c

test: sum2ints-test
./sum2ints-test

sum2ints-test: implementation-test.o implementation.o
gcc -o sum2ints-test implementation.o implementation-test.o $(LIBS)

implementation-test.o: implementation-test.c implementation.h
gcc $(CFLAGS) -c implementation-test.c

I've prepared a .zip file for you containing all the above.

https://dl.dropbox.com/u/1987095/test-check.zip

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  • 2
    On Debian "Jessie" I needed to link additional libraries: LIBS=-lcheck -lm -lpthread -lrt Dec 25, 2013 at 17:27
  • Thank you! At first I've learnt how to use check with autotools but for smaller projects your tutorial rocks!
    – Grigory
    Jan 17, 2015 at 8:31
  • 1
    checkmk looks cool, but it's not necessarily bundled with check, it's a separate project.
    – rampion
    Jan 18, 2015 at 2:40
  • Using "GNU Make 3.81" and "gcc (Ubuntu 4.8.4-2ubuntu1~14.04.1) 4.8.4", I get undefined references to floor, __pthread_register_cancel, timer_create, timer_settime, and timer_delete unless I add the -pthread and -lm arguments. @freestyler
    – JeffH
    Jun 26, 2016 at 17:32
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    @JeffH, for you and others having issues in Ubuntu, you can figure out what additionally you need to add with pkg-config --cflags --libs check, which will probably return something like -pthread -pthread -lcheck_pic -lrt -lm Use this entire string in place of the author's -lcheck.
    – skelliam
    Oct 19, 2016 at 1:21
12

The answer of @freestyler is good, but it still uses checkmk, which is not necessary.

This is a minimal example without using checkmk.

Put the following in a file named test.c:

#include <check.h>

START_TEST (sanity_check)
{
    fail_unless(5 == 5, "this should succeed");
    fail_unless(6 == 5, "this should fail");
}
END_TEST

int main(void)
{
    Suite *s1 = suite_create("Core");
    TCase *tc1_1 = tcase_create("Core");
    SRunner *sr = srunner_create(s1);
    int nf;

    suite_add_tcase(s1, tc1_1);
    tcase_add_test(tc1_1, sanity_check);

    srunner_run_all(sr, CK_ENV);
    nf = srunner_ntests_failed(sr);
    srunner_free(sr);

    return nf == 0 ? 0 : 1;
}

and compile with

gcc test.c -Wall -o test -lcheck -pthread -lcheck_pic -pthread -lrt -lm -lsubunit
1
  • This is great. I don't understand why in the docs they don't provide a simplest case example. In any case, I got this working but got some errors compiling with some of the options you used (I am a total C beginner, so not sure what some of these options are). Regardless, for me it works with: gcc test.c -Wall -o test -lcheck -pthread -pthread -lm
    – Aaron
    Mar 29 at 5:25

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