238

I have a website with center-aligned DIV. Now, some pages need scrolling, some don't. When I move from one type to another, the appearance of a scrollbar moves the page a few pixels to the side. Is there any way to avoid this without explicitly showing the scrollbars on each page?

3

20 Answers 20

285

overflow-y:scroll is correct, but you should use it with the html tag, not body or else you get a double scrollbar in IE 7
So the correct css would be:

html {
  overflow-y: scroll;
}
7
  • 1
    IE 10+ has a floating scrollbar so you should disable this for these browsers – Ruben Mar 25 '14 at 14:28
  • 1
    this can cause problems like double scrollbars when using in combination with fancybox or twitter bootstrap modal – Ruben Apr 1 '14 at 12:41
  • extra info: twitter bootstrap now adds .modal-open to you body when a modal is open – Ruben Sep 2 '14 at 6:58
  • 66
    Worth mentioning that this permanently shows a vertical scrollbar. May not always be acceptable. – rustyx Dec 24 '15 at 10:40
  • 1
    I get a double scrollbar in both Chromium and Firefox. I'm using flex-box; maybe that is causing this... – Garrett Apr 9 '16 at 6:19
88

Wrap the content of your scrollable element into a div and apply padding-left: calc(100vw - 100%);.

<body>
    <div style="padding-left: calc(100vw - 100%);">
        Some Content that is higher than the user's screen
    </div>
</body>

The trick is that 100vw represents 100% of the viewport including the scrollbar. If you subtract 100%, which is the available space without the scrollbar, you end up with the width of the scrollbar or 0 if it is not present. Creating a padding of that width on the left will simulate a second scrollbar, shifting centered content back to the right.

Please note that this will only work if the scrollable element uses the page's entire width, but this should be no problem most of the time because there are only few other cases where you have centered scrollable content.

12
  • 3
    Would be better applied via a class than an inline style, and will only work in these browsers, but this is a clever technique - I hadn't realised that 100vw and 100% measured different things, so I've learnt something useful from this! – Nick F Jan 25 '16 at 17:48
  • 24
    This is absolutely genius and is truly the best answer considering browser support for calc is very good. – michael Jun 23 '16 at 20:33
  • 1
    You can do the same except instead of adding a margin to the left, you add a negative margin to the right (see stackoverflow.com/a/39289453/6015444). – Touniouk Jan 31 '18 at 16:35
  • 3
    This solution will cause similar issues with background color like the answer "width: calc(100vw - 34px);" but on left side. – Maciej Lew Feb 2 '18 at 22:13
  • 1
    I would recommend to add some media queries to this style- @media screen and (min-width: 800px) {...} . In cases when content will fit page width. For example on small resolutions there will be unneeded gap, shifting content to the right – MarkosyanArtur Aug 21 '19 at 7:08
43

I think not. But styling body with overflow: scroll should do. You seem to know that, though.

6
  • 3
    Sounds good... force the page to always show the scrollbar whether it needs it or not, ... then there is no visual change between page types. – eidylon Sep 13 '09 at 16:10
  • 1
    Yes, but IIRC, this shows both scrollbars. I don't really need the horizontal one. – Dmitri Nesteruk Sep 14 '09 at 10:47
  • That's true. But there's not much I can do to help you :( Actually, I only consider the first sentence of my reply to be the real answer that deals with the question. – Michael Krelin - hacker Sep 14 '09 at 10:59
  • 2
    Following is the better answer – Sami Nov 26 '12 at 8:41
  • @MichaelKrelin-hacker ur answer saved me to fix a problem. tnk u. – madhu kumar Oct 18 '13 at 13:03
36

With scroll always being shown, maybe be not good for layout.

Try to limit body width with css3

body {
    width: calc(100vw - 34px);
}

vw is the width of the viewport (see this link for some explanation)
calc calculate in css3
34px stands for double scrollbar width (see this for fixed or this to calculate if you don't trust fixed sizes)

10
  • 4
    Everything is futility until someone needs. – Moesio Dec 28 '15 at 17:15
  • 3
    This is visually much less intrusive than just forcing scollbars like the accepted answer describes. – Silas Hansen Feb 9 '16 at 9:58
  • 4
    This has worked the best for my needs so far, I also added padding-left: 34px; to evenly center my page. – Pat Migliaccio May 10 '16 at 19:07
  • 3
    This should be the accepted answer, unlike the currently accepted one it's actually answering the question! – Coz Jul 1 '16 at 22:57
  • 2
    This will cause issues if you have navbar/header with different color than body background or bottom border etc. – Zia Ul Rehman Mughal Dec 15 '16 at 6:44
30
html {
  overflow-x: hidden;
  margin-right: calc(-1 * (100vw - 100%));
}

Example. Click "change min-height" button.

With calc(100vw - 100%) we can calculate the width of the scrollbar (and if it is not displayed, it will be 0). Idea: using negative margin-right, we can increase the width of <html> to this width. You will see a horizontal scroll bar — it should be hidden using overflow-x: hidden.

3
  • I had to put the body in a div and apply the margin to the div for it to work (similar to Rapti's answer.) But this looks so much neater. – Touniouk Jan 31 '18 at 16:33
  • 2
    This works great and doesn't seem to result in unwanted horizontal scrollbars in Chrome or Firefox. Why not just use calc(100% - 100vw) instead of multiplying by -1? – SystemParadox Jul 10 '19 at 11:43
  • this puts content under the scrollbar, hiding it. – DRC Jul 9 '20 at 16:18
15

If changing size or after loading some data it is adding the scroll bar then you can try following, create class and apply this class.

.auto-scroll {
   overflow-y: overlay;
   overflow-x: overlay;
}
1
  • overflow: overlay isn't supported in firefox according to MDN. "Only supported in WebKit-based (e.g., Safari) and Blink-based (e.g., Chrome or Opera) browsers." – Erik J. Sep 7 '20 at 8:20
13

I don't know if this is an old post, but i had the same problem and if you want to scroll vertically only you should try overflow-y:scroll

0
4

Extending off of Rapti's answer, this should work just as well, but it adds more margin to the right side of the body and hides it with negative html margin, instead of adding extra padding that could potentially affect the page's layout. This way, nothing is changed on the actual page (in most cases), and the code is still functional.

html {
    margin-right: calc(100% - 100vw);
}
body {
    margin-right: calc(100vw - 100%);
}
3
  • 1
    I found that on chrome this adds a horizontal scroll on pages that have a vertical scrollbar on my bootstrap site. – Ginger Squirrel May 30 '18 at 8:42
  • Have you tried looking into why? Check the element inspector and see if Bootstrap messes with margins, scrollbars, or anything like that. – Grant Gryczan May 31 '18 at 22:16
  • 1
    It probably was something to do with the 15px margins that bootstrap puts on everything, when inspecting the page the container margin falls under the scrollbar. I applied overflow-x: hidden and that fixed it. – Ginger Squirrel Jun 1 '18 at 10:44
4

@kashesandr's solution worked for me but to hide horizontal scrollbar I added one more style for body. here is complete solution:

CSS

<style>
/* prevent layout shifting and hide horizontal scroll */
html {
  width: 100vw;
}
body {
  overflow-x: hidden;
}
</style>

JS

$(function(){
    /**
     * For multiple modals.
     * Enables scrolling of 1st modal when 2nd modal is closed.
     */
    $('.modal').on('hidden.bs.modal', function (event) {
      if ($('.modal:visible').length) {
        $('body').addClass('modal-open');
      }
    });
});

JS Only Solution (when 2nd modal opened from 1st modal):

/**
 * For multiple modals.
 * Enables scrolling of 1st modal when 2nd modal is closed.
 */
$('.modal').on('hidden.bs.modal', function (event) {
  if ($('.modal:visible').length) {
    $('body').addClass('modal-open');
    $('body').css('padding-right', 17);
  }
});
4

Simply setting the width of your container element like this will do the trick

width: 100vw;

This will make that element ignore the scrollbar and it works with background color or images.

1
  • 1
    Setting this on the "body" element works, but adds a horizontal scroll bar (using Firefox). Any other reasons why this solution is not a good idea? – TomDogg Jul 22 '20 at 14:21
3

I've solved the issue on one of my websites by explicitly setting the width of the body in javascript by the viewport size minus the width of the scrollbar. I use a jQuery based function documented here to determine the width of the scrollbar.

<body id="bodyid>

var bodyid = document.getElementById('bodyid');
bodyid.style.width = window.innerWidth - scrollbarWidth() + "px";
3
  • 10
    I can't even begin to explain why this is such bad practice. – mythofechelon Jun 21 '12 at 10:33
  • 20
    @BenHooper: I'd like to know why this is bad practice. – foamroll Oct 21 '13 at 21:32
  • 1
    What happens if you resize the window? – Braden Steffaniak Jan 12 '17 at 6:22
3

Expanding on the answer using this:

body {
    width: calc(100vw - 17px);
}

One commentor suggested adding left-padding as well to maintain the centering:

body {
    padding-left: 17px;
    width: calc(100vw - 17px);
}

But then things don't look correct if your content is wider than the viewport. To fix that, you can use media queries, like this:

@media screen and (min-width: 1058px) {
    body {
        padding-left: 17px;
        width: calc(100vw - 17px);
    }
}

Where the 1058px = content width + 17 * 2

This lets a horizontal scrollbar handle the x overflow and keeps the centered content centered when the viewport is wide enough to contain your fixed-width content

2

I tried to fix likely the same issue which caused by twitter bootstrap .modal-open class applied to body. The solution html {overflow-y: scroll} doesn't help. One possible solution I found is to add {width: 100%; width: 100vw} to the html element.

4
  • 1
    or change it to body {overflow-y: scroll} – Ruben Oct 2 '15 at 7:21
  • 1
    But that would always display a scrollbar even if it is not required. – Rapti Feb 5 '18 at 21:55
  • You should explain why are you setting width twice? html { width: 100vw; } worked for me – Hassan Tareq Oct 29 '19 at 1:20
  • For me, it actually creates two scrollbar – rbansal Feb 16 '20 at 7:17
2

I use to have that problem, but the simples way to fix it is this (this works for me):

on the CSS file type:

body{overflow-y:scroll;}

as that simple! :)

2

The solutions posted using calc(100vw - 100%) are on the right track, but there is a problem with this: You'll forever have a margin to the left the size of the scrollbar, even if you resize the window so that the content fills up the entire viewport.

If you try to get around this with a media query you'll have an awkward snapping moment because the margin won't progressively get smaller as you resize the window.

Here's a solution that gets around that and AFAIK has no drawbacks:

Instead of using margin: auto to center your content, use this:

body {
margin-left: calc(50vw - 500px);
}

Replace 500px with half the max-width of your content (so in this example the content max-width is 1000px). The content will now stay centered and the margin will progressively decrease all the way until the content fills the viewport.

In order to stop the margin from going negative when the viewport is smaller than the max-width just add a media query like so:

@media screen and (max-width:1000px) {
    body {
        margin-left: 0;
    }
}

Et voilà!

1
2

If the width of the table won't change, you can set the width of the element (such as tbody) that contains the scrollbar > 100% (allowing extra space for the scrollbar) and set overflow-y to "overlay" (so that the scrollbar stays fixed, and won't shift the table left when it appears). Also set a fixed height for the element with the scrollbar, so the scrollbar will appear once the height is exceeded. Like so:

tbody {
  height: 100px;
  overflow-y: overlay;
  width: 105%
}

Note: you will have to manually adjust the width % as the % of space the scrollbar takes up will be relative to your table width (ie: smaller width of table, more % required to fit the scrollbar, as it's size in pixels is constant)

A dynamic table example:

function addRow(tableID)
{
    var table = document.getElementById(tableID);
    var rowCount = table.rows.length;
    var row = table.insertRow(rowCount);
    var colCount = table.rows[0].cells.length;
  
    for(var i=0; i<colCount; i++)
    {
        var newRow = row.insertCell(i);

        newRow.innerHTML = table.rows[0].cells[i].innerHTML;
        newRow.childNodes[0].value = "";
    }
}
 
function deleteRow(row)
{
    var table = document.getElementById("data");
    var rowCount = table.rows.length;
    var rowIndex = row.parentNode.parentNode.rowIndex;

    document.getElementById("data").deleteRow(rowIndex);
}
.scroll-table {
  border-collapse: collapse;
}

.scroll-table tbody {
  display:block;
  overflow-y:overlay;
  height:60px;
  width: 105%
}

.scroll-table tbody td {
  color: #333;
  padding: 10px;
  text-shadow: 1px 1px 1px #fff;
}

.scroll-table thead tr {
  display:block;
}

.scroll-table td {
    border-top: thin solid; 
    border-bottom: thin solid;
}

.scroll-table td:first-child {
    border-left: thin solid;
}

.scroll-table td:last-child {
    border-right: thin solid;
}

.scroll-table tr:first-child {
    display: none;
}

.delete_button {
    background-color: red;
    color: white;
}

.container {
  display: inline-block;
}

body {
  text-align: center;
}
<!DOCTYPE html>
<html lang="en">
<head>
  <link rel="stylesheet" href="test_table.css">
</head>

<body>
<h1>Dynamic Table</h1>
<div class="container">

  <table id="data" class="scroll-table">
    <tbody>
      <tr>
        <td><input type="text" /></td>
        <td><input type="text" /></td>
        <td><input type="button" class="delete_button" value="X" onclick="deleteRow(this)"></td>
      </tr>
    </tbody>
  </table>

  <input type="button" value="Add" onclick="addRow('data')" />

</div>

<script src="test_table.js"></script>
</body>
</html>

0

My approach is to make the track transparent. The scroll bar thumb color is #C1C1C1 to match the default scrollbar thumb color. You can make it anything you prefer :)

Try this:

html {
    overflow-y: scroll;
}

body::-webkit-scrollbar {
    width: 0.7em;
    background-color: transparent;
}

body::-webkit-scrollbar-thumb {
    background: #C1C1C1;
    height:30px;
}

body::-webkit-scrollbar-track-piece
{
    display:none;
}
-3

I used some jquery to solve this

$('html').css({
    'overflow-y': 'hidden'
});

$(document).ready(function(){
  $(window).load(function() {
    $('html').css({
      'overflow-y': ''
    });
  });
});
2
-4
@media screen and (min-width: 1024px){
    body {
    min-height: 700px
    }
}
1
  • Welcome to Stack Overflow! While this code snippet may solve the question, including an explanation really helps to improve the quality of your post. Remember that you are answering the question for readers in the future, and those people might not know the reasons for your code suggestion. Please also try not to crowd your code with explanatory comments, this reduces the readability of both the code and the explanations! – Andrew Myers May 31 '16 at 20:06
-5

Contrary to the accepted answer which suggests a permanent scroll bar on the browser window even if the content doesn't overflow the screen, I would prefer using:

html{
  height:101%;
}

This is because the appearance of scroll bar makes more sense if the content actually overflows.

This makes more sense than this.

1
  • 1
    At least last sentence is wrong in your answer. It makes sense similar with excess empty page printed by printer. – vp_arth Dec 21 '16 at 18:39

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