0

I want to understand the difference in the behavior of a program when we call FormsAuthentication.RedirectFromLoginPage vs. when we call Response.Redirect(FormsAuthentication.GetRedirectUrl()) and manually redirect.

Please see the comments below.

I have a LoginController/Index (two actions, one for HttpGet and one for HttpPost). The View of this controller represents the application's login page.

I also have a home page or landing page, i.e. the page that the user must be taken to after a successful login. This is represented in my application by the HomeController's Index action and the ~Views/Home/Index.cshtml view.

I have presented three scenarios. I understand scenario 1 and I expect it to work the way it does, but I noted a difference in scenarios 2 and 3.

Scenario 1

namespace Controllers
{
    [AllowAnonymous]
    public class LoginController : Controller
    {
        [HttpPost]
        public ActionResult Index(Login loginViewModel)
        {
            if (ModelState.IsValid)
            {
                var user = ValidateUser(loginViewModel);

                if (user != null)
                {
                    // Other stuff: set cookies, session state, etc.

                    return RedirectToAction("Index", "Home");
                }
                else
                {
                    ModelState.AddModelError("", "Invalid password. Please try again.");
                }
            }

            // If the user was a valid user, the flow-of-control won't reach here
            // as expected and the user will be taken to the view that is served
            // by the HomeController::Index() action. If it is by convention, it will 
            // be the ~Views/Home/Index.cshtml view. This is fine.
            return View();
        }
    }
}

Scenario 2

namespace Controllers
{
    [AllowAnonymous]
    public class LoginController : Controller
    {
        [HttpPost]
        public ActionResult Index(Login loginViewModel)
        {
            if (ModelState.IsValid)
            {
                var user = ValidateUser(loginViewModel);

                if (user != null)
                {
                    // Other stuff: set cookies, session state, etc.

                    Response.Redirect(FormsAuthentication.GetRedirectUrl(loginViewModel.UserName, 
                        loginViewModel.RememberMe));
                }
                else
                {
                    ModelState.AddModelError("", "Invalid password. Please try again.");
                }
            }

            // If the user was a valid user, the flow-of-control still reaches here
            // as expected. And as expected, it renders the same View, i.e. the View
            // associated with the controller we are in, which is ~Views/Login/Index, 
            // which represents the login page. This is wrong. I shouldn't redirect here.
            // I understand this. My question here is two fold:
            // 1) I am simply trying to understand the difference in behaviors of the three 
            //    scenarios described in this question.
            // 2) Given this, the right way would be to not use Response.Redirect here but instead
            //    use RedirectToAction. However, if I wanted to use Response.Redirect, what should
            //    I do?
            return View();
        }
    }
}

Scenario 3

namespace Controllers
{
    [AllowAnonymous]
    public class LoginController : Controller
    {
        [HttpPost]
        public ActionResult Index(Login loginViewModel)
        {
            if (ModelState.IsValid)
            {
                var user = ValidateUser(loginViewModel);

                if (user != null)
                {
                    // Other stuff: set cookies, session state, etc.

                    FormsAuthentication.RedirectFromLoginPage(loginViewModel.UserName, 
                        loginViewModel.RememberMe);
                }
                else
                {
                    ModelState.AddModelError("", "Invalid password. Please try again.");
                }
            }

            // If the user was a valid user, the flow-of-control still reaches here
            // as expected. However, magically, somehow, even though the statement below
            // suggests that the user must be taken to the View of the same controller and
            // action that we are currently in, i.e. the View of the LoginController::Index()
            // action, i.e. the ~Views/Login/Index.cshtml, it magically takes me to the 
            // ~Views/Home/Index.cshtml instead, which is what is specified as the LoginPage
            // attribute of the <authentication>/<forms> element in the web.config.
            // I want to know how this happens.
            return View();
        }
    }
}

Update

I am at my wit's end now. Now, even Scenario 1 that uses RedirectToAction is calling the Index() action on the LoginController class.

1

The actual difference is that FormsAuthentication.RedirectFromLoginPage() sets cookies and then makes redirects but FormsAuthentication.GetRedirectUrl() only returns redirect url.

The funny thing is that implementation of FormsAuthentication.GetRedirectUrl() is like this:

public static String GetRedirectUrl(String userName, bool createPersistentCookie)
{ 
    if (userName == null) 
        return null;
    return GetReturnUrl(true); 
}

So actually userName and createPersistentCookie parameters are completely ignored. You must call FormsAuthentication.SetAuthCookie( userName, true/false ) manually before calling GetRedirectUrl.

0

Agree with Vasily. RedirectFromLoginPage issues an authentication ticket and places it in the default cookie using the SetAuthCookie method.
You can read something about this behavior here.

If you want to have a better control over the cookie creation you should (encryption, expiration, extending the principal) you should create the cookie yourself.
I explained the whole process here and here.

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