19

I want to compile the following file (temp.cpp):

#include <iostream> 

class Foo {
public:
  Foo() = default;
};

int main(){
  std::cout << "Works!" << std::endl;
  return 0;
}

With the following command: clang++ temp.cpp -o temp -std=c++11 -Weverything -Werror

There is an error:

temp.cpp:5:11: error: defaulted function definitions are incompatible with C++98 [-Werror,-Wc++98-compat]

I understand that there is a warning like c++98-compat and it is part of everything. How can I enable all warnings except c++98-compat? Is there a c++11 compatible flag for -Weverything?

7
  • 3
    Add -Wno-c++98-compat, but I don't know if there's a generic way.
    – Mat
    Jan 6, 2013 at 11:54
  • 1
    @Mat Can you please post this as an answear so I can accept it.
    – Kocka
    Jan 6, 2013 at 11:58
  • 1
    Weverything enables all the warning, it has nothing to do with C++98, try -Wall and/or -Wextra Jan 6, 2013 at 11:59
  • I have no idea if that is enough to have a "c++11 compatible flag for -Weverything" as you ask for.
    – Mat
    Jan 6, 2013 at 11:59
  • 1
    I want all the warnings, which are not against c++11. So I want Weverything. Using just Wall is not an option.
    – Kocka
    Jan 6, 2013 at 12:37

1 Answer 1

36

Actually, you probably do not want all the warnings, because a number of warnings can be considered as being stylistic or subjective and others (such as the one you ran afoul of) are just stupid in your situation.

-Weverything was initially built for two reasons:

  • discovery: it's pretty hard otherwise to get a list of all available warnings
  • black-listing alternative: with gcc, you cherry pick the warnings you wish to apply (white-listing), with -Weverything you cherry pick those you do not wish to apply; the advantage is that when moving over to a new version of the compiler, you are more likely to benefit from new warnings

Obviously, discovery is not really compatible with production use; therefore you seem to fall in the black-listing case.

Clang diagnostics system will output (by default) the name of the most specific warning group that is responsible for generating a warning (here -Wc++98-compat) and each warning group can be turned off by adding no- right after the -W.

Therefore, for blacklisting, you get:

-Weverything -Wno-c++98-compat -Wno-...

And you are encouraged to revise the list of blacklisted warnings from time to time (for example, when you upgrade to a newer compiler).

1
  • 2
    Also -Wno-c++98-compat-pedantic, assuming you’re fortunate enough to be able to use GCC_WARN_PEDANTIC = YES. Jul 13, 2018 at 16:34

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