44

What's memcached's maximum key expiration time?

If I don't provide an expiration time and the cache gets full, what happens?

51

You can set key expiration to a date, by supplying a Unix timestamp instead of a number of days. This date can be more than 30 days in the future:

Expiration times are specified in unsigned integer seconds. They can be set from 0, meaning "never expire", to 30 days (60*60*24*30). Any time higher than 30 days is interpreted as a unix timestamp date. If you want to expire an object on january 1st of next year, this is how you do that.

https://github.com/memcached/memcached/wiki/Programming#expiration

But, as you say, if you’re setting key expiration to an amount of time rather than a date, the maximum is 2,592,000 seconds, or 30 days.

  • 3
    OMG, We had numerous cases in Rails of :expires_in => 1.month. Change to 1.month.from_now to use a date. – Tom Harrison Jul 3 '13 at 20:46
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    The link referenced is dead :( – marcgg Mar 19 '14 at 9:24
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    @marcgg: aha yes, well-spotted, thank you. Fixed. – Paul D. Waite Mar 19 '14 at 9:47
  • @PaulD.Waite Great reactivity! I read the article and I'm still unsure about the behavior of everything. If you have a couple of minutes to spare and can take a look at the specific of my question: stackoverflow.com/questions/22500824/… , it would be most appreciated :) – marcgg Mar 19 '14 at 10:07
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    Link dead again – Luca Steeb Jan 14 '17 at 23:12
16

If you don't provide expiration and cache gets full then the oldest key-values are expired first:

Memory is also reclaimed when it's time to store a new item. If there are no free chunks, and no free pages in the appropriate slab class, memcached will look at the end of the LRU for an item to "reclaim". It will search the last few items in the tail for one which has already been expired, and is thus free for reuse. If it cannot find an expired item however, it will "evict" one which has not yet expired. This is then noted in several statistical counters

https://github.com/memcached/memcached/wiki/UserInternals#when-are-items-evicted

  • 2
    are you 100% sure about this? – DJ' Jun 9 '11 at 18:09
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    Yes, @DeeJay', just found this article: code.google.com/p/memcached/wiki/NewUserInternals – Brett Oct 17 '12 at 19:53
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    Memory is also reclaimed when it's time to store a new item. If there are no free chunks, and no free pages in the appropriate slab class, memcached will look at the end of the LRU for an item to "reclaim". It will search the last few items in the tail for one which has already been expired, and is thus free for reuse. If it cannot find an expired item however, it will "evict" one which has not yet expired. This is then noted in several statistical counters. – Brett Oct 17 '12 at 19:53
  • The link is down – Luca Steeb Jan 14 '17 at 23:13
10

No there is no limit. The 30 days limit is if you give the amount of seconds it should stay there, but if you give a timestamp, there is only the max long or int value on the machine which can be a limit.

->set('key', 'value', time() + 24*60*60*365) will make the key stay there for a year for example, but yeah if the cache gets full or restarted in between, this value can be deleted.

3

An expiration time, in seconds. Can be up to 30 days. After 30 days, is treated as a unix timestamp of an exact date.

https://code.google.com/p/memcached/wiki/NewCommands#Standard_Protocol

1

OK, I found out that the number of seconds may not exceed 2592000 (30 days). So the maximum expiration time is 30 days.

  • 11
    No, that's not true. The number of seconds in a duration form may not exceed 30 days. You can specify an expiration three months out if you want to as an absolute time. You can also specify 0 to not have an expiration. – Dustin Dec 2 '09 at 4:19
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    I've also found out that if you provide too long expiration time the value is not stored at all. – Datageek Dec 23 '11 at 20:13
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    I've found that 30 days doesn't work (doesn't write cache) but 29 days does work. – Zubin Feb 11 '13 at 22:21
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    @Zubin I just discovered that the hard way, and it sucks that it silently fails like that.. – Karthik T Nov 1 '13 at 11:05
  • Same here @KarthikT, the documentation was misleading ("may not exceed 30 days" indicates that 30 days should be allowed). – Zubin Nov 3 '13 at 21:26
1

Looks like some answers are not valid anymore.

I found out a key does not get set at all when the TTL is too high. For example 2992553564.

Tested with the following PHP code:

var_dump($memcached->set($id, "hello", 2992553564);  // true
var_dump($memcached->get($id));                      // empty!

var_dump($memcached->set($id, "hello", 500);  // true
var_dump($memcached->get($id));               // "hello"

Version is memcached 1.4.14-0ubuntu9.

0

On laravel config.session.lifetime setting that if set to be an equivalent of 30days above, will be considered as a timestamp (this will give an error of token mismatch everytime assuming that memcached is used).

To answer, memcached expiration could be set anytime. (Laravel's default setting (on v5.0) will set you to an already expire timestamp). If you did not set it, the defualt will be used.

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