0
class a
{
   object guest;
}

a::a() : guest(required_argument)
{
}

The problem is that I need the guest's constructor to be called AFTER creating class' a object. Is there a way to do it?

3 Answers 3

5

If you want to keep guest as an object, no.

If you are free to make it a pointer, you can use lazy initialization for it.

2
  • That's a shame it's not possible, but for sure there are reasons for it. Thanks for answer anyway. Jan 6, 2013 at 18:04
  • 1
    @user1873947 the reason is that if object has a constructor, it's not a POD, so the standard mandates it get initialized. Jan 6, 2013 at 18:04
2

The real question is why do you need guest's constructor to be called after a's constructor?

guest is a part of a, so having its constructor invoked after a's constructor is a contradiction in terms: an object is completely constructed only if all of its sub-objects are completely constructed, so completing the execution of a's constructor implies completing the execution of guest's constructor.

Of course, this doesn't mean you cannot just default-construct guest during a's construction and assign it a different value after or, if you do not want a guest object to be constructed at all during a's construction, to use a pointer (better if smart pointer) for modeling the association between a and object.

1
  • The a class is main gui class and the guest object is a widget which uses main gui's resources. I declared guest as a std::shared_ptr and I call make_shared in a's constructor and that has done the job. Jan 6, 2013 at 18:13
1

I suppose the reason for guest to be constructed after host is that some functionality of host is required in the construction of guest. In this case, you can out-source that functionality into a separate class which is constructed before guest. Thus

class some_interface { /* some abstract functionality needed by guest::guest() */ };

class guest
{
public:
  guest(some_interface const&); // calls pure virtual functions of some_interface
  /* more stuff */
};

class host_interface : public some_interface 
{
  /* implements pure virtual methods of its base */
};

class host
{
  host_interface _interface;
  guest _guest;
public:
  host(...)
  : _interface(...)
  , _guest(_interface)
  {}
  /* more stuff */  
};

Note that the following naive implementation will fail

class host : some_interface
{
  /* some_data */
  guest _guest;
public:
  host(...)
  : some_data(...)
  , _guest(*this)
  {}
  /* more stuff */
};

because this is not yet constructed when passed to guest::guest(), and the pure virtual functions will be called (I really had this bug once and got the run-time error "pure-virtual function called", even though the compiler should have been able to detect this).

0

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