16

I would like to learn how to use binding functions. Here is the idea: I have this function which takes to parameters:

void print_i(int t, std::string separator)
{
        std::cout << t << separator;
}

And I would like to do:

std::vector<int> elements;
// ...
for_each(elements.begin(), elements.end(), std::bind2nd(print_i, '\n'));

But it does not work !

Here is what I get:

/usr/include/c++/4.3/backward/binders.h: In instantiation of ‘std::binder2nd<void ()(int, std::string)>’:
main.cpp:72:   instantiated from here
/usr/include/c++/4.3/backward/binders.h:138: error: ‘void ()(int, std::string)’ is not a class, struct, or union type
/usr/include/c++/4.3/backward/binders.h:141: error: ‘void ()(int, std::string)’ is not a class, struct, or union type
/usr/include/c++/4.3/backward/binders.h:145: error: ‘void ()(int, std::string)’ is not a class, struct, or union type
/usr/include/c++/4.3/backward/binders.h:149: error: ‘void ()(int, std::string)’ is not a class, struct, or union type
/usr/include/c++/4.3/backward/binders.h:155: error: ‘void ()(int, std::string)’ is not a class, struct, or union type
/usr/include/c++/4.3/backward/binders.h:140: error: field ‘std::binder2nd<void ()(int, std::string)>::op’ invalidly declared function type
/usr/include/c++/4.3/backward/binders.h: In function ‘std::binder2nd<_Operation> std::bind2nd(const _Operation&, const _Tp&) [with _Operation = void ()(int, std::string), _Tp = char]’:
main.cpp:72:   instantiated from here
/usr/include/c++/4.3/backward/binders.h:164: error: ‘void ()(int, std::string)’ is not a class, struct, or union type
/usr/include/c++/4.3/bits/stl_algo.h: In function ‘_Funct std::for_each(_IIter, _IIter, _Funct) [with _IIter = __gnu_cxx::__normal_iterator<int*, std::vector<int, std::allocator<int> > >, _Funct = std::binder2nd<void ()(int, std::string)>]’:
main.cpp:72:   instantiated from here
/usr/include/c++/4.3/bits/stl_algo.h:3791: error: no match for call to ‘(std::binder2nd<void ()(int, std::string)>) (int&)’
make: *** [all] Error 1

I could use functor, but it is quicker to use binding.

Thanks!

  • 2
    It's not related to the question, so a small comment instead. Shortest code to output a range is probably copying it into ostream_iterator, e.g. std::copy(v.begin(), v.end(), std::ostream_iterator<int>(std::cout, "\n"));. – Cat Plus Plus Sep 13 '09 at 20:40
11

The argument to bind2nd must be an AdaptableBinaryFunction. A plain binary function does not fulfill this requirement (an adaptable function required typedefs for its return and argument types, a plain function type does not provide any typedefs). You could use std::bind which is probably the better choice anyway.

  • Could you please give me an example of an AdaptableBinaryFunction ?<br>Thanks – Arthur Sep 13 '09 at 20:41
  • 8
    std::ptr_fun can convert binary function into AdaptableBinaryFunction: sgi.com/tech/stl/ptr_fun.html – Cat Plus Plus Sep 13 '09 at 20:49
26

You need to use a Copyable/Refrencable object, the following works:

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <vector>
#include <algorithm>
#include <functional>

void print_i(int t, std::string separator)
{
   std::cout << t << separator;
}

int main()
{
   std::vector<int> elements;
   std::string delim = "\n";
   for_each(elements.begin(), 
            elements.end(),
            std::bind2nd(std::ptr_fun(&print_i),delim));
   return 0;
}

Normally you can get the same effect by simply doing the following:

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <algorithm>
#include <iterator>

int main()
{
   std::vector<int> elements;
   std::copy(elements.begin(),
             elements.end(),
             std::ostream_iterator<int>(std::cout,"\n"));
   return 0;
}

Also assuming you have access to TR1 in the STL you're using, its always best to revise/replace any uses of bind1st and bind2nd with std::bind

3

You need to do the following steps:
1. create a struct (or class) that inherits from std::binary_function
2. define your predicate function in the operator() member function of the struct created in step 1
3. use bind2nd to bind an appropriate value to the struct created in step 1

I have done all this in an example. You can read the article and download the complete code on the following link: bind and find

  • 2
    Welcome to SO ! don't hesitate to include code, there is an option in the edit mode the button looks like that:{}, and having a short explicative code example is always good, like class A{public: bool operator()(const B& b){ doSomething(); return true;}... just an example :-) – Stephane Rolland Dec 8 '12 at 0:29
1

These functions are deprecated since C++11 and removed in C++17. As mentioned in one comment above, the better solution now is to use std::bind and the placeholders:

void callable(int a, int b);
auto f = std::bind1st(&callable, 42); // returns a 1-arg function

becomes:

// returns a 1-arg function
auto f = std::bind(&callable, 42, std::placeholders::_1);
  • Although you are technically right, one should use lambdas instead of std::bind variants anyway — it's a drop-in replacement. – login_not_failed Aug 28 '18 at 14:54
  • Personally I sometimes find std::bind more readable than lambdas, depending on the surrounding code. This is only a preference though, I agree both work fine. – James Turner Aug 29 '18 at 8:50

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.