59

I know this has been asked so many times, and because of that it's difficult to dig through the cruft and find a simple example of what works.

I've got this, it's simple and it works for MyClass...

#include <iostream>
using std::cout;
using std::endl;

class MyClass
{
    public:
        MyClass();
        static void Callback(MyClass* instance, int x);
    private:
        int private_x;
};

class EventHandler
{
    public:
        void addHandler(MyClass* owner)
        {
            cout << "Handler added..." << endl;
            //Let's pretend an event just occured
            owner->Callback(owner,1);
        }
};

EventHandler* handler;

MyClass::MyClass()
{
    private_x = 5;
    handler->addHandler(this);
}

void MyClass::Callback(MyClass* instance, int x)
{
    cout << x + instance->private_x << endl;
}

int main(int argc, char** argv)
{
    handler = new EventHandler();
    MyClass* myClass = new MyClass();
}

class YourClass
{
    public:
        YourClass();
        static void Callback(YourClass* instance, int x);
};

How can that be rewritten so EventHandler::addHandler() will work with both MyClass and YourClass. I'm sorry but it's just the way my brain works, I need to see a simple example of what works before I can comprehend why/how it works. If you've got a favorite way to make this work now's the time to show it off, please markup that code and post it back.

[edit]

It was answered but the answer was deleted before I could give the checkmark. The answer in my case was a templated function. Changed addHandler to this...

class EventHandler
{
    public:
        template<typename T>
        void addHandler(T* owner)
        {
            cout << "Handler added..." << endl;
            //Let's pretend an event just occured
            owner->Callback(owner,1);
        }
};
  • 2
    Who posted the templated function example? You got the checkmark, but you deleted your answer while I was testing. It did exactly what I needed. A simple function template got lost in the stew of all the other info I was reading. Your answer added as edit to question. – BentFX Jan 7 '13 at 3:42
  • I think it was JaredC. You may need to hunt him down =P – WhozCraig Jan 7 '13 at 3:43
132

Instead of having static methods and passing around a pointer to the class instance, you could use functionality in the new C++11 standard: std::function and std::bind:

#include <functional>
class EventHandler
{
    public:
        void addHandler(std::function<void(int)> callback)
        {
            cout << "Handler added..." << endl;
            // Let's pretend an event just occured
            callback(1);
        }
};

The addHandler method now accepts a std::function argument, and this "function object" have no return value and takes an integer as argument.

To bind it to a specific function, you use std::bind:

class MyClass
{
    public:
        MyClass();

        // Note: No longer marked `static`, and only takes the actual argument
        void Callback(int x);
    private:
        int private_x;
};

MyClass::MyClass()
{
    using namespace std::placeholders; // for `_1`

    private_x = 5;
    handler->addHandler(std::bind(&MyClass::Callback, this, _1));
}

void MyClass::Callback(int x)
{
    // No longer needs an explicit `instance` argument,
    // as `this` is set up properly
    cout << x + private_x << endl;
}

You need to use std::bind when adding the handler, as you explicitly needs to specify the otherwise implicit this pointer as an argument. If you have a free-standing function, you don't have to use std::bind:

void freeStandingCallback(int x)
{
    // ...
}

int main()
{
    // ...
    handler->addHandler(freeStandingCallback);
}

Having the event handler use std::function objects, also makes it possible to use the new C++11 lambda functions:

handler->addHandler([](int x) { std::cout << "x is " << x << '\n'; });
  • 3
    Thanks Joachim! This example does a lot to demystify std::function and std::bind. I'll certainly use it in the future! edit I still don't get lambda at all :) – BentFX Jan 7 '13 at 3:58
  • The templated class does just what I need, but the static functions and instance pointers don't make for nice reading. :) The more I look at this the better I understand it, and who knows, it just may be the future. – BentFX Jan 7 '13 at 4:20
  • 3
    I folded this into my larger project(about 6,000 lines. That's big for me.) It uses vectors of button definitions with differing callbacks and parameters then feeds that to wxWidgets, so objects can manage their own buttons in the wxFrame. This simplified things a lot! I can't say it enough, the internet contains far too much technicality and opinion, and not enough simple examples. – BentFX Jan 7 '13 at 5:39
  • 1
    @user819640 There is no "unbind", instead std::bind just returns an (unspecified) object, and when you're done with it you can just let it go out of scope. If the bound object is destructed and you try to call the function you will get undefined behavior. – Some programmer dude Jan 3 '15 at 18:41
  • 1
    handler->addHandler(), means that somewhere you create an object of EventHandler? Good answer btw, +1. – gsamaras Aug 7 '15 at 10:03
3

What you want to do is to make an interface which handles this code and all your classes implement the interface.

class IEventListener{
public:
   void OnEvent(int x) = 0;  // renamed Callback to OnEvent removed the instance, you can add it back if you want.
};


class MyClass :public IEventListener
{
    ...
    void OnEvent(int x); //typically such a function is NOT static. This wont work if it is static.
};

class YourClass :public IEventListener
{

Note that for this to work the "Callback" function is non static which i believe is an improvement. If you want it to be static, you need to do it as JaredC suggests with templates.

3

Here's a concise version that works with class method callbacks and with regular function callbacks. In this example, to show how parameters are handled, the callback function takes two parameters: bool and int.

class Caller {
  template<class T> void addCallback(T* const object, void(T::* const mf)(bool,int))
  {
    using namespace std::placeholders; 
    callbacks_.emplace_back(std::bind(mf, object, _1, _2));
  }
  void addCallback(void(* const fun)(bool,int)) 
  {
    callbacks_.emplace_back(fun);
  }
  void callCallbacks(bool firstval, int secondval) 
  {
    for (const auto& cb : callbacks_)
      cb(firstval, secondval);
  }
private:
  std::vector<std::function<void(bool,int)>> callbacks_;
}

class Callee {
  void MyFunction(bool,int);
}

//then, somewhere in Callee, to add the callback, given a pointer to Caller `ptr`

ptr->addCallback(this, &Callee::MyFunction);

//or to add a call back to a regular function
ptr->addCallback(&MyRegularFunction);

This restricts the C++11-specific code to the addCallback method and private data in class Caller. To me, at least, this minimizes the chance of making mistakes when implementing it.

1

MyClass and YourClass could both be derived from SomeonesClass which has an abstract (virtual) Callback method. Your addHandler would accept objects of type SomeonesClass and MyClass and YourClass can override Callback to provide their specific implementation of callback behavior.

  • For what I'm doing I toyed with this idea. But because of the number of widely different classes that that would be using my handler I didn't see it as an option. – BentFX Jan 7 '13 at 4:03
0

A complete working example from the code above.... for C++11:

#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <functional>

#if __cplusplus <= 199711L
  #error This file needs at least a C++11 compliant compiler, try using:
  #error    $ g++ -std=c++11 ..
#endif

using namespace std;

class EventHandler {
    public:
        void addHandler(std::function<void(int)> callback) {
            printf("\nHandler added...");
            // Let's pretend an event just occured
            callback(1);
        }
};


class MyClass
{
    public:
        MyClass(int);
        // Note: No longer marked `static`, and only takes the actual argument
        void Callback(int x);

    private:
        EventHandler *pHandler;
        int private_x;
};

MyClass::MyClass(int value) {
    using namespace std::placeholders; // for `_1`

    pHandler = new EventHandler();
    private_x = value;
    pHandler->addHandler(std::bind(&MyClass::Callback, this, _1));
}

void MyClass::Callback(int x) {
    // No longer needs an explicit `instance` argument,
    // as `this` is set up properly
    printf("\nResult:%d\n\n", (x+private_x));
}

// Main method
int main(int argc, char const *argv[]) {

    printf("\nCompiler:%ld\n", __cplusplus);
    new MyClass(5);
    return 0;
}


// where $1 is your .cpp file name... this is the command used:
// g++ -std=c++11 -Wall -o $1 $1.cpp
// chmod 700 $1
// ./$1

Output should be:

Compiler:201103

Handler added...
Result:6
-1

If you have callbacks with different parameters you can use templates as follows:
// compile with: g++ -std=c++11 myTemplatedCPPcallbacks.cpp -o myTemplatedCPPcallbacksApp

#include <functional>     // c++11

#include <iostream>        // due to: cout


using std::cout;
using std::endl;

class MyClass
{
    public:
        MyClass();
        static void Callback(MyClass* instance, int x);
    private:
        int private_x;
};

class OtherClass
{
    public:
        OtherClass();
        static void Callback(OtherClass* instance, std::string str);
    private:
        std::string private_str;
};

class EventHandler
{

    public:
        template<typename T, class T2>
        void addHandler(T* owner, T2 arg2)
        {
            cout << "\nHandler added..." << endl;
            //Let's pretend an event just occured
            owner->Callback(owner, arg2);
         }   

};

MyClass::MyClass()
{
    EventHandler* handler;
    private_x = 4;
    handler->addHandler(this, private_x);
}

OtherClass::OtherClass()
{
    EventHandler* handler;
    private_str = "moh ";
    handler->addHandler(this, private_str );
}

void MyClass::Callback(MyClass* instance, int x)
{
    cout << " MyClass::Callback(MyClass* instance, int x) ==> " 
         << 6 + x + instance->private_x << endl;
}

void OtherClass::Callback(OtherClass* instance, std::string private_str)
{
    cout << " OtherClass::Callback(OtherClass* instance, std::string private_str) ==> " 
         << " Hello " << instance->private_str << endl;
}

int main(int argc, char** argv)
{
    EventHandler* handler;
    handler = new EventHandler();
    MyClass* myClass = new MyClass();
    OtherClass* myOtherClass = new OtherClass();
}
  • 1
    Can you please explain what you did to solve the OP's problem? Is it really necessary to include the complete code of the OP? The OP wanted his code to work with his YourClass. You seem to have removed that class and added a different OtherClass. Moreover, the question has already a well received answer. In how far is your solution better so that it is worth posting? – honk Oct 9 '14 at 16:03
  • I did not say My posting is a better solution. I showed how to use "OtherClass" in a template way. – mohDady Oct 9 '14 at 17:51

Your Answer

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.