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How can I query git to find out which branches contain a given commit? gitk will usually list the branches, unless there are too many, in which case it just says "many (38)" or something like that. I need to know the full list, or at least whether certain branches contain the commit.

1299

From the git-branch manual page:

 git branch --contains <commit>

Only list branches which contain the specified commit (HEAD if not specified). Implies --list.


 git branch -r --contains <commit>

Lists remote tracking branches as well (as mentioned in user3941992's answer below) that is "local branches that have a direct relationship to a remote branch".


See also this git ready article.

The --contains tag will figure out if a certain commit has been brought in yet into your branch. Perhaps you’ve got a commit SHA from a patch you thought you had applied, or you just want to check if commit for your favorite open source project that reduces memory usage by 75% is in yet.

$ git log -1 tests
commit d590f2ac0635ec0053c4a7377bd929943d475297
Author: Nick Quaranto <nick@quaran.to>
Date:   Wed Apr 1 20:38:59 2009 -0400

    Green all around, finally.

$ git branch --contains d590f2
  tests
* master

Note: if the commit is on a remote tracking branch, add the -a option.
(as MichielB comments below)

git branch -a --contains <commit>

MatrixFrog comments that it only shows which branches contain that exact commit.
If you want to know which branches contain an "equivalent" commit (i.e. which branches have cherry-picked that commit) that's git cherry:

Because git cherry compares the changeset rather than the commit id (sha1), you can use git cherry to find out if a commit you made locally has been applied <upstream> under a different commit id.
For example, this will happen if you’re feeding patches <upstream> via email rather than pushing or pulling commits directly.

           __*__*__*__*__> <upstream>
          /
fork-point
          \__+__+__-__+__+__-__+__> <head>

(Here, the commits marked '-' wouldn't show up with git cherry, meaning they are already present in <upstream>.)

  • 3
    tests and master - master is the current branch, therefore the asterisk. – blueyed Mar 25 '11 at 13:31
  • 48
    This only shows which branches contain that exact commit. If you want to know which branches contain an "equivalent" commit (i.e. which branches have cherry-picked that commit) that's git cherry: "Because git cherry compares the changeset rather than the commit id (sha1), you can use git cherry to find out if a commit you made locally has been applied <upstream> under a different commit id. For example, this will happen if you’re feeding patches <upstream> via email rather than pushing or pulling commits directly." kernel.org/pub/software/scm/git/docs/git-cherry.html – MatrixFrog Apr 14 '11 at 1:04
  • 57
    Add a -a parameter to also check remote branches. – Raman Jan 25 '12 at 23:45
  • 23
    You can also do git tag --contains <commit>. See Searching for all tags that contain a commit?. – Andrew Marshall Jan 18 '13 at 17:42
  • 4
    For the git cherry part @UpAndAdam asked the question here: stackoverflow.com/questions/16304574/…, alas, the question has not (yet) been answered. – adeelx Aug 6 '14 at 19:24
16

You may run:

git log <SHA1>..HEAD --ancestry-path --merges

From comment of last commit in the output you may find original branch name

Example:

       c---e---g--- feature
      /         \
-a---b---d---f---h---j--- master

git log e..master --ancestry-path --merges

commit h
Merge: g f
Author: Eugen Konkov <>
Date:   Sat Oct 1 00:54:18 2016 +0300

    Merge branch 'feature' into master
  • 6
    Nice! I used git log <SHA1>..master --ancestry-path --merges --oneline | tail -n1 to get this in one line – James EJ Aug 11 '17 at 19:59
  • 1
    If you would like to use pure git command, you could use: git log <SHA1>..master --ancestry-path --merges --oneline -1 – Bartosz Mar 23 '18 at 12:03

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