18

Without using any gems how do I do this in rails?

Main Category
 Sub Category
 Sub Category
 Sub Category

Main Category
 Sub Category
 Sub Category
 Sub Category

Main Category
 Sub Category
 Sub Category
 Sub Category

I have a table that consists of | id | level1 | level2 |

Level 1 being the main category and Level 2 being the subcategory

I would like it displayed in the view like above.

After looking around on the internet everyone seems to recommend using acts-like-a-tree gem, but i want to avoid using them as I'm fairly new to rails and I would like to understand how to do things rather than turn to gems.

Your help is much apreciated

Model:

class Category < ActiveRecord::Base
belongs_to :catalogue
    has_many :subcategories, :class_name => "Category", :foreign_key => "parent_id", :dependent => :destroy
belongs_to :parent_category, :class_name => "Category"
end

Controller:

class CataloguesController < ApplicationController
  layout 'main'
  def index
   @cats = Catalogue.all
  end

  def categories
   @cat = Catalogue.find(params[:id])
  end

end

View:

<ul class="unstyled-list">

    <% @cat.categories.order([:level1]).each do |cat|%>
        <li><%=  cat.level1 %></li>
        <li><%= cat.level2 %></li>
    <% end %>
</ul>
52

Create a model that has references to itself for a sub-category (or a sub-sub-category, etc):

class Category < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :subcategories, :class_name => "Category", :foreign_key => "parent_id", :dependent => :destroy
  belongs_to :parent_category, :class_name => "Category"
end
  • the has_many defines a subcategories association of the model type Category. Ie it uses the same table.
  • the belongs_to defines a relation back to the parent category (optional, not required)

For more information on model associations, has_many or belongs_to, read the Associations Basics Guide.

To create the table use this migration:

class CreateCategories < ActiveRecord::Migration
  def self.up
    create_table :category do |t|
      t.string      :text
      t.references  :parent
      t.timestamps
    end
  end
end

Note: this table format is (slightly) different than you proposed, but I suppose that this is not a real problem.

The Migrations Guide contains more information on database migrations.

In your controller use

def index
  @category = nil
  @categories = Category.find(:all, :conditions => {:parent_id => nil } )
end

to find all categories without a parent, ie the main categories

To find all sub-categories of any given category use:

# Show subcategory
def show
  # Find the category belonging to the given id
  @category = Category.find(params[:id])
  # Grab all sub-categories
  @categories = @category.subcategories
  # We want to reuse the index renderer:
  render :action => :index
end

To add a new category use:

def new
  @category = Category.new
  @category.parent = Category.find(params[:id]) unless params[:id].nil?
end 

It creates a new category and sets the parent, if it is provided (otherwise it becomes a Main Category)

Note: I used the old rails syntax (due to laziness), but for Rails 3.2 the principle is the same.

In your categories/index.html.erb you can use something like this:

<h1><%= @category.nil? ? 'Main categories' : category.text %></h1>
<table>
<% @categories.each do |category| %>
<tr>
  <td><%= link_to category.text, category_path(category) %></td>
  <td><%= link_to 'Edit', edit_category_path(category) unless category.parent.nil? %></td>
  <td><%= link_to 'Destroy', category_path(category), :confirm => 'Are you sure?', :method => :delete unless category.parent.nil? %></td>
</tr>
<% end %>
</table>
<p>
  <%= link_to 'Back', @category.parent.nil? ? categories_path : category_path(@category.parent) unless @category.nil? %>
  <%= link_to 'New (sub-category', new_category_path(@category) unless @category.nil? %>
</p>

It shows the name of the selected category (or Main Category) and all of its sub-categories (in a nice table). It links to all sub-categories, showing a similar layout, but for the sub-category. In the end it adds a 'new sub-category' link and a 'back' link.

Note: My answer became a bit extensive... I copied and modified it from one of my projects that uses a similar construction (for (sub-)menus). So hopefully I did not break anything during the modifications... :)

  • Thanks for the quick answer I will try this now :) – Ollie2619 Jan 7 '13 at 14:39
  • Sorry im fairly new to this ive added what i have to the post can you help some more please? – Ollie2619 Jan 7 '13 at 15:04
  • 2
    in order to make :parent_category work, I needed to add :foreign_key=>"parent_id" . Otherwise, it was returning nil. – scaryguy Jul 10 '13 at 22:21
  • 2
    In Rails 5, if you're creating a migration to add to an existing table called categories, you can use: add_reference :categories, :parent, foreign_key: {to_table: :categories} – Tebbers Nov 4 '16 at 9:32
  • 2
    In Rails 5 you need to add optional: true to the belongs_to relation. belongs_to :parent_category, class_name: "Category", optional: true, because whenever we define a belongs_to association, it is required to have the associated record present. – Panos Angel Mar 14 '17 at 13:36

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