I'm writing a stored procedure that needs to clean up some data if an insert fails. I'd like it to perform the clean up, but return the original error if this insert fails (primarily for logging as I want to see exactly why the insert failed). Basically like a throw; in C#. Is there a simple way to do this?

BEGIN TRY
    Insert into table (col1) values ('1")
END TRY
BEGIN CATCH
    --do clean up here
    --then throw original error
END TRY

Is this feasible/good practice? In the application code that calls the proc, I'm handling the error from an application standpoint, but the clean up statements seem to better fit inside the proc.

  • usually you do roll back and clean up in the catch block. I personally thought that was one of the best uses of catch block in stored procedures. You just need to be sure that any of your roll back/clean up is not going to create more errors and that whatever you are trying to clean up, is malleable after your error. – Pow-Ian Jan 7 '13 at 20:11
  • 1
    The short answer is to use RAISERROR because there is no THROW in SQL Server until version 2012. This article gives the long answer: simple-talk.com/sql/database-administration/… – Pondlife Jan 7 '13 at 20:16
  • 1
    In SQL Server 2012 you can use THROW(). In SQL Server 2008 you can't throw/re-raise. – Aaron Bertrand Jan 7 '13 at 20:16
  • 1
    Can you explain how the selected answer actually solved this problem? What error are you catching that you can re-raise successfully using RAISERROR (not RAISEERROR)? – Aaron Bertrand Jan 7 '13 at 21:11
up vote -1 down vote accepted

Try the following snippet.

DECLARE @errNum int
DECLARE @rowCount int

BEGIN TRY
    INSERT INTO [TABLE] (COL1) VALUES ('1")
END TRY
BEGIN CATCH
    SET @errNum = @@ERROR
    SET @rowCount = @@ROWCOUNT
    RAISEERROR(@errNum)
END CATCH
  • I think you mean RAISERROR, not RAISE – Pondlife Jan 7 '13 at 20:17
  • Yes, thank you. – Jason Satterfield Jan 7 '13 at 20:18
  • 1
    (1) nvarchar without length? (2) What is RAISEERROR (extra E) and why is the syntax missing severity / state? (3) Have you tried this? I get, e.g., Msg 2732, Level 16, State 1, Line 9 Error number 8xxx is invalid. The number must be from 13000 through 2147483647 and it cannot be 50000. – Aaron Bertrand Jan 7 '13 at 20:19

I usually do something like this:

IF EXISTS (SELECT * FROM dbo.sysobjects WHERE id = object_id(N'[dbo].[procedure_name]') AND ObjectProperty(id, N'IsProcedure') = 1)
    DROP PROCEDURE [dbo].[procedure_name]
GO

CREATE PROCEDURE [dbo].[procedure_name]
(
    @param1 VARCHAR(100)
   ,@param2 INT
)

AS

/*
*******************************************************************************
<Name>
[procedure_name]
</Name>

<Purpose>
[Purpose]
</Purpose>

<Notes>
</Notes>

<OutsideRef>
Called From: [Called From]
</OutsideRef>

<ChangeLog>
Change No:   Date:          Author:       Description:                          
_________    ___________    __________    _____________________________________
   001       [DATE]         [YOU]         Created.                           
</ChangeLog>
*******************************************************************************
*/
BEGIN
    SET NOCOUNT ON
    SET XACT_ABORT OFF -- Allow procedure to continue after error

    -- *****************************************
    -- Parameter string. Used for error handling
    -- *****************************************
    DECLARE  @ErrorNumber       INT 
            ,@ErrorMessage      VARCHAR(400)
            ,@ErrorSeverity     INT
            ,@ErrorState        INT
            ,@ErrorLine         INT
            ,@ErrorProcedure    VARCHAR(128)
            ,@ErrorMsg          VARCHAR(2000)
            ,@NestedProc        BIT = 1
            ,@Params            VARCHAR(255);    -- String representing parameters, make it an appropriate size given your parameters.

    --Be Careful of the CONVERT here, GUIDs (if you use them) need 36 characters, ints need 10, etc.        
    SET @Params = ''
                + CHAR(13) + '@param1 = ' + COALESCE(CONVERT(VARCHAR(100), @param1), 'NULL') 
                + CHAR(13) + '@param2 = ' + COALESCE(CONVERT(VARCHAR(10), @param2), 'NULL')

    BEGIN TRY
        --If you're using transactions, and want an 'all or nothing' approach, use this so that
        --you only start a single transaction in the outermost calling procedure (or handle 
        --that through your application layer)
        IF @@TRANCOUNT = 0
        BEGIN
            SET @NestedProc = 0
            BEGIN TRANSACTION
        END

        INSERT INTO [TABLE]
            (
             COL1
            ,COL2
            )
        VALUES
            (
             @param1
            ,@param2
            );

        --Commit the transaction if this is the outtermost procedure and if there is a transaction to rollback.
        IF @@TRANCOUNT > 0 AND @NestedProc = 0
        BEGIN
            COMMIT TRANSACTION
        END
    END TRY

    BEGIN CATCH
        --Roll back the transaction if this is the outtermost procedure and if there is a transaction to rollback.
        IF @@TRANCOUNT > 0 AND @NestedProc = 0
        BEGIN
            ROLLBACK TRANSACTION
        END

        -- Execute the error retrieval routine.
        SELECT 
            @ErrorNumber = ERROR_NUMBER(),
            @ErrorSeverity = ERROR_SEVERITY(),
            @ErrorProcedure = ERROR_PROCEDURE(),
            @ErrorState = ERROR_STATE(),
            @ErrorLine = ERROR_LINE(),
            @ErrorMessage = ERROR_MESSAGE();

        SET @ErrorMsg = 'Error Number   : ' + CAST(@ErrorNumber AS VARCHAR(5)) + CHAR(13)
                      + 'Procedure Name : ' + @ErrorProcedure + CHAR(13)
                      + 'Procedure Line : ' + CAST(@ErrorLine AS VARCHAR(5)) + CHAR(13)
                      + 'Error Message  : ' + @ErrorMessage + CHAR(13)
                      + 'Parameters     : ' + CHAR(13) + @Params + CHAR(13);

        --Raise the exception.
        RAISERROR (@ErrorMsg, @ErrorSeverity, @ErrorState);
    END CATCH
END
GO

This type of procedure allows you to have nesting procs with transactions (so long as the desired effect is that if an error is thrown anywhere, you'll eventually throw back up to the outer procedure and then rollback). A pretty important scenario that I don't think this template handles is the case where an error that's severe enough to completely kill the procedure is thrown. Perhaps someone else could chime in on that front.

Assuming we are using a table MyTable defined as

CREATE TABLE [dbo].[MyTable](
    [Col1] [int] NOT NULL
) ON [PRIMARY]

The I would use a procedure similar to the one below.

In the case of insert failure the code will enter the Catch block where a check for the error number/message can be perform and assigned.

Once assigned the transaction can be rolled back and the error number/message returned.

You may need to change the SQL Server Error number in the RAISERROR error line depending on what you are doing.

CREATE PROCEDURE [dbo].[zTestProc]

AS
BEGIN

    SET NOCOUNT ON;
    DECLARE 
            @LocalError     INT,
            @ErrorMessage   VARCHAR(4000)

    BEGIN TRY
        BEGIN TRANSACTION TestTransaction

        Insert into MyTable(col1) values ('01/01/2002')


        COMMIT TRANSACTION TestTransaction

    END TRY
    BEGIN CATCH

        SELECT  @LocalError     =   ERROR_NUMBER(),
                @ErrorMessage   =   ERROR_MESSAGE()

        IF( XACT_STATE()) <>0
        BEGIN
            ROLLBACK TRANSACTION TestTransaction
        END

        RAISERROR ('TestSP: %d: %s', 16, 1, @LocalError, @ErrorMessage) ;
        RETURN(0)

    END CATCH


END

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