32

So here's where I've made it so far. I am using a UIImage captured from the camera and can crop the center square when in landscape. For some reason this doesn't translate to portrait mode as expected. I'll post my code and logs just for reference.

Code:

CGRect squareRect = CGRectMake(offsetX, offsetY, newWidth, newHeight);
CGImageRef imageRef = CGImageCreateWithImageInRect([image CGImage], squareRect);
image = [UIImage imageWithCGImage:imageRef scale:1 orientation:image.imageOrientation];

Portrait results (not square):

original image size: {1536, 2048}, with orientation: 3
squareRect: {{0, 256}, {1536, 1536}}
new image size: {1280, 1536}, with orientation: 3 <--- not expected

Landscape results (square):

original image size: {2048, 1536}, with orientation: 1
squareRect: {{256, 0}, {1536, 1536}}
new image size: {1536, 1536}, with orientation: 1

Is this a bug within CGImageCreateWithImageInRect() or am I missing something here?

18 Answers 18

26

I think here would be the perfect solution!
It is NOT good idea to crop image basis on the toSize's size. It will look weird when the image resolution (size) is very large.
Following code will crop the image as per the toSize's ratio.
Improved from @BlackRider's answer.

- (UIImage *)imageByCroppingImage:(UIImage *)image toSize:(CGSize)size
{
    double newCropWidth, newCropHeight;

    //=== To crop more efficently =====//
    if(image.size.width < image.size.height){
         if (image.size.width < size.width) {
                 newCropWidth = size.width;
          }
          else {
                 newCropWidth = image.size.width;
          }
          newCropHeight = (newCropWidth * size.height)/size.width;
    } else {
          if (image.size.height < size.height) {
                newCropHeight = size.height;
          }
          else {
                newCropHeight = image.size.height;
          }
          newCropWidth = (newCropHeight * size.width)/size.height;
    }
    //==============================//

    double x = image.size.width/2.0 - newCropWidth/2.0;
    double y = image.size.height/2.0 - newCropHeight/2.0;

    CGRect cropRect = CGRectMake(x, y, newCropWidth, newCropHeight);
    CGImageRef imageRef = CGImageCreateWithImageInRect([image CGImage], cropRect);

    UIImage *cropped = [UIImage imageWithCGImage:imageRef];
    CGImageRelease(imageRef);

    return cropped;
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    THIS is the best solution. – Joan Cardona Jan 8 '16 at 11:13
  • 2
    Best ever solution! Works well. Thanks. (Y) – iGatiTech May 18 '16 at 4:17
  • Thanks! However, this code's logic for setting newCropWidth and newCropHeight is incorrect if size.height is greater than size.width. – VinceFior May 12 '18 at 22:58
  • @VinceFior It would be good if you can explain a bit more how it's incorrect! (It would be easy to understand with an example). Thanks! – Nirav Dangi May 14 '18 at 7:35
  • Sure. Example: size is (5, 10) and image.size is (8, 10). The code goes into the if case and into the nested else case, yielding newCropWidth = 8 and newCropHeight = 16, or (8, 16). The aspect ratio is correct, but the scale matches the larger dimension of the input image instead of the desired size. – VinceFior May 26 '18 at 21:30
25

This works with different orientations. Both portrait and landscape orientations works correctly.

- (UIImage *)imageByCroppingImage:(UIImage *)image toSize:(CGSize)size
{
    // not equivalent to image.size (which depends on the imageOrientation)!
    double refWidth = CGImageGetWidth(image.CGImage);
    double refHeight = CGImageGetHeight(image.CGImage);

    double x = (refWidth - size.width) / 2.0;
    double y = (refHeight - size.height) / 2.0;

    CGRect cropRect = CGRectMake(x, y, size.height, size.width);
    CGImageRef imageRef = CGImageCreateWithImageInRect([image CGImage], cropRect);

    UIImage *cropped = [UIImage imageWithCGImage:imageRef scale:0.0 orientation:self.imageOrientation];
    CGImageRelease(imageRef);

    return cropped;
}
| improve this answer | |
  • I haven't tested this, but I'm going to take your word that it works better than BlackRider's answer. I ended up finding a solution to this quite a while later on a different project and never posted my answer here. Although I forgot what my solution was, I do remember that it was a mess :) – Uxonith Jan 6 '15 at 17:14
20

Based on the checked answer by Elmundo and its swift version by Imbrue, here is the same solution that automatically calculates the size of the image's center (taking orientation into account), and with error consideration:

func cropImageToSquare(image: UIImage) -> UIImage? {
    var imageHeight = image.size.height
    var imageWidth = image.size.width

    if imageHeight > imageWidth {
        imageHeight = imageWidth
    }
    else {
        imageWidth = imageHeight
    }

    let size = CGSize(width: imageWidth, height: imageHeight)

    let refWidth : CGFloat = CGFloat(CGImageGetWidth(image.CGImage))
    let refHeight : CGFloat = CGFloat(CGImageGetHeight(image.CGImage))

    let x = (refWidth - size.width) / 2
    let y = (refHeight - size.height) / 2

    let cropRect = CGRectMake(x, y, size.height, size.width)
    if let imageRef = CGImageCreateWithImageInRect(image.CGImage, cropRect) {
        return UIImage(CGImage: imageRef, scale: 0, orientation: image.imageOrientation)
    }

   return nil
}

Swift 3 version

func cropImageToSquare(image: UIImage) -> UIImage? {
    var imageHeight = image.size.height
    var imageWidth = image.size.width

    if imageHeight > imageWidth {
        imageHeight = imageWidth
    }
    else {
        imageWidth = imageHeight
    }

    let size = CGSize(width: imageWidth, height: imageHeight)

    let refWidth : CGFloat = CGFloat(image.cgImage!.width)
    let refHeight : CGFloat = CGFloat(image.cgImage!.height)

    let x = (refWidth - size.width) / 2
    let y = (refHeight - size.height) / 2

    let cropRect = CGRect(x: x, y: y, width: size.height, height: size.width)
    if let imageRef = image.cgImage!.cropping(to: cropRect) {
        return UIImage(cgImage: imageRef, scale: 0, orientation: image.imageOrientation)
    }

    return nil
}
| improve this answer | |
  • Top! Amazing answer! – thefabbulus Aug 11 at 18:03
13

Try something like this:

- (UIImage *)imageByCroppingImage:(UIImage *)image toSize:(CGSize)size
{
    double x = (image.size.width - size.width) / 2.0;
    double y = (image.size.height - size.height) / 2.0;

    CGRect cropRect = CGRectMake(x, y, size.height, size.width);
    CGImageRef imageRef = CGImageCreateWithImageInRect([image CGImage], cropRect);

    UIImage *cropped = [UIImage imageWithCGImage:imageRef];
    CGImageRelease(imageRef);

    return cropped;
}

As you see, I don't specify orientation in the call to UIImage imageWithCGImage:. I wonder if that's the problem in your code.

| improve this answer | |
  • I thought that worked at first, but it turns out that I had removed my offsetX and offsetY for a bit while testing your code. I still get the same results, only the orientation is incorrect. – Uxonith Jan 7 '13 at 22:04
8

There is the swift version for the checked solution :

private func imageByCroppingImage(image : UIImage, size : CGSize) -> UIImage{
        var refWidth : CGFloat = CGFloat(CGImageGetWidth(image.CGImage))
        var refHeight : CGFloat = CGFloat(CGImageGetHeight(image.CGImage))

        var x = (refWidth - size.width) / 2
        var y = (refHeight - size.height) / 2

        let cropRect = CGRectMake(x, y, size.height, size.width)
        let imageRef = CGImageCreateWithImageInRect(image.CGImage, cropRect)

        let cropped : UIImage = UIImage(CGImage: imageRef, scale: 0, orientation: image.imageOrientation)!


        return cropped
    }
| improve this answer | |
5

improved from @Elmundo's answer

+(UIImage *)getCenterMaxSquareImageByCroppingImage:(UIImage *)image withOrientation:(UIImageOrientation)imageOrientation

{
    CGSize centerSquareSize;
    double oriImgWid = CGImageGetWidth(image.CGImage);
    double oriImgHgt = CGImageGetHeight(image.CGImage);
    NSLog(@"oriImgWid==[%.1f], oriImgHgt==[%.1f]", oriImgWid, oriImgHgt);
    if(oriImgHgt <= oriImgWid) {
        centerSquareSize.width = oriImgHgt;
        centerSquareSize.height = oriImgHgt;
    }else {
        centerSquareSize.width = oriImgWid;
        centerSquareSize.height = oriImgWid;
    }

    NSLog(@"squareWid==[%.1f], squareHgt==[%.1f]", centerSquareSize.width, centerSquareSize.height);

    double x = (oriImgWid - centerSquareSize.width) / 2.0;
    double y = (oriImgHgt - centerSquareSize.height) / 2.0;
    NSLog(@"x==[%.1f], x==[%.1f]", x, y);

    CGRect cropRect = CGRectMake(x, y, centerSquareSize.height, centerSquareSize.width);
    CGImageRef imageRef = CGImageCreateWithImageInRect([image CGImage], cropRect);

    UIImage *cropped = [UIImage imageWithCGImage:imageRef scale:0.0 orientation:imageOrientation];
    CGImageRelease(imageRef);


    return cropped;
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    @Imran glad that it helps :-) – srjohnhuang Jun 11 '15 at 3:03
4

This is an old question, but none of the answers are really correct (even the accepted answer). The important thing to understand is that UIImageOrientation (image.imageOrientation) is actually correct, but it's definition of UP and our definition of UP are different. For us, UP is the top of the device (where the power button is). For UIImageOrientation, UP is the side opposite of the volume control buttons. So if the device takes a picture with the volume controls down, this is UIImageOrientationUp. If you take a picture in portrait mode (with the home button down), this is UIImageOrientationLeft.

So you can calculate the center in portrait, then you can apply the following transform to the image so that the crop is in the correct place.

- (UIImage *)cropImage:(UIImage*)image toRect:(CGRect)rect {
    CGFloat (^rad)(CGFloat) = ^CGFloat(CGFloat deg) {
        return deg / 180.0f * (CGFloat) M_PI;
    };

    // determine the orientation of the image and apply a transformation to the crop rectangle to shift it to the correct position
    CGAffineTransform rectTransform;
    switch (image.imageOrientation) {
        case UIImageOrientationLeft:
            rectTransform = CGAffineTransformTranslate(CGAffineTransformMakeRotation(rad(90)), 0, -image.size.height);
            break;
        case UIImageOrientationRight:
            rectTransform = CGAffineTransformTranslate(CGAffineTransformMakeRotation(rad(-90)), -image.size.width, 0);
            break;
        case UIImageOrientationDown:
            rectTransform = CGAffineTransformTranslate(CGAffineTransformMakeRotation(rad(-180)), -image.size.width, -image.size.height);
            break;
        default:
            rectTransform = CGAffineTransformIdentity;
    };

    // adjust the transformation scale based on the image scale
    rectTransform = CGAffineTransformScale(rectTransform, image.scale, image.scale);

    // apply the transformation to the rect to create a new, shifted rect
    CGRect transformedCropSquare = CGRectApplyAffineTransform(rect, rectTransform);
    // use the rect to crop the image
    CGImageRef imageRef = CGImageCreateWithImageInRect(image.CGImage, transformedCropSquare);
    // create a new UIImage and set the scale and orientation appropriately
    UIImage *result = [UIImage imageWithCGImage:imageRef scale:image.scale orientation:image.imageOrientation];
    // memory cleanup
    CGImageRelease(imageRef);

    return result;
}

This code shifts the crop square so that it is in the correct relative position.

| improve this answer | |
4

Swift 3

    let refWidth : CGFloat = CGFloat(image.cgImage!.width)
    let refHeight : CGFloat = CGFloat(image.cgImage!.height)

    let x = (refWidth - size.width) / 2
    let y = (refHeight - size.height) / 2

    let cropRect = CGRect(x: x, y: y, width: size.width, height: size.height)
    let imageRef = image.cgImage!.cropping(to: cropRect)

    let cropped : UIImage = UIImage(cgImage: imageRef!, scale: 0, orientation: image.imageOrientation)


    return cropped
| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    Could you please add some explanation (about what OP is doing wrong) to your answer instead of just a code dump? – PeeHaa Sep 15 '16 at 15:44
  • 1
    Or rather, please explain how your answer improves upon the existing ones. Why is yours (in some situations / for some people) better than theirs? – Hermann Döppes Sep 15 '16 at 16:04
4

Swift 2 using UIImage Extension

extension UIImage
{    
    func imageByCroppingImage(size : CGSize) -> UIImage
    {
        let refWidth : CGFloat = CGFloat(CGImageGetWidth(self.CGImage))
        let refHeight : CGFloat = CGFloat(CGImageGetHeight(self.CGImage))

        let x = (refWidth - size.width) / 2
        let y = (refHeight - size.height) / 2

        let cropRect = CGRectMake(x, y, size.width, size.height)
        let imageRef = CGImageCreateWithImageInRect(self.CGImage, cropRect)

        let cropped : UIImage = UIImage(CGImage: imageRef!, scale: 0, orientation: self.imageOrientation)


        return cropped
    }
}
| improve this answer | |
4

This is based on @Alonzo's Swift 3 answer above, with the code simplified and streamlined to make it more understandable and concise. It also bails out if the image is already square.

extension UIImage {
    func square() -> UIImage? {
        if size.width == size.height {
            return self
        }

        let cropWidth = min(size.width, size.height)

        let cropRect = CGRect(
            x: (size.width - cropWidth) * scale / 2.0,
            y: (size.height - cropWidth) * scale / 2.0,
            width: cropWidth * scale,
            height: cropWidth * scale
        )

        guard let imageRef = cgImage?.cropping(to: cropRect) else {
            return nil
        }

        return UIImage(cgImage: imageRef, scale: scale, orientation: imageOrientation)
    }
}
| improve this answer | |
  • Good changes @mixel – phatmann May 21 '18 at 22:13
  • Does't centre the image in portrait mode. – zeeshan May 28 at 18:38
  • Can you be more specific @zeeshan? – phatmann May 31 at 14:48
  • when a photo is taken in portrait mode, this code does crop it fine, but not from the centre. So if your face was in the centre of the image, in the cropped image it would have your left ear (right of the image) cut off and too much empty space on the left. When taken in landscape mode, then it does crop it from the centre. I can't attach sample images here. But I was able to find another code which works fine. @phatmann – zeeshan Jun 1 at 15:14
1

Xamarin:

UIImage ImageByCroppingImage(UIImage image, CGSize size)
{
    double newCropWidth, newCropHeight;

    if (image.Size.Width < image.Size.Height)
    {
        newCropWidth = image.Size.Width < size.Width ? size.Width : image.Size.Width;
        newCropHeight = (newCropWidth * size.Height) / size.Width;
    }
    else
    {
        newCropHeight = image.Size.Height < size.Height ? size.Height : image.Size.Height;
        newCropWidth = (newCropHeight * size.Width) / size.Height;
    }

    double x = image.Size.Width / 2.0 - newCropWidth / 2.0;
    double y = image.Size.Height / 2.0 - newCropHeight / 2.0;

    CGRect cropRect = new CGRect(x, y, newCropWidth, newCropHeight);
    var imageRef = image.CGImage.WithImageInRect(cropRect);

    var cropped = new UIImage(imageRef);

    return cropped;
}
| improve this answer | |
1

what about getting help from UIImageView

+ (UIImage *)laodSquareImage:(UIImage *)image withDiameter:(CGFloat)diameter  
{
    CGRect frame = CGRectMake(0.0f, 0.0f, diameter, diameter);
    UIImageView *imageView = [[UIImageView alloc] initWithFrame:frame];
    imageView.contentMode = UIViewContentModeScaleAspectFill;
    imageView.clipsToBounds = YES;
    imageView.image = image;
    CALayer *layer = imageView.layer;


    layer.masksToBounds = YES;
    UIGraphicsBeginImageContextWithOptions(imageView.bounds.size,NO, [UIScreen mainScreen].scale);
    CGContextRef context = UIGraphicsGetCurrentContext();
    [layer renderInContext:context];


    UIImage *roundedImage = UIGraphicsGetImageFromCurrentImageContext();
    UIGraphicsEndImageContext();

    return roundedImage;
}

And you can also make the image circle by adding just a line.

layer.cornerRadius =MAX( imageView.frame.size.height,imageView.frame.size.width)/2;
| improve this answer | |
  • Will this actually take the full image or the lower res sample from the view width? – tommybananas Mar 14 '18 at 23:12
1

there are already many solution, but i wanna post mine:

  extension UIImage {

    var cgImageWidth: Int { return cgImage?.width ?? 0 }
    var cgImageheight: Int { return cgImage?.height ?? 0 }
    var blance: CGFloat { return min(size.width, size.height)}
    var blanceSize: CGSize { return CGSize(width: blance, height: blance) }
    var blanceRect: CGRect { return CGRect(origin: .zero, size: blanceSize) }

    var roundedImage: UIImage? {
        UIGraphicsBeginImageContextWithOptions(blanceSize, false, scale)
        defer { UIGraphicsEndImageContext() }
        guard let cgImage = cgImage?.cropping(to: CGRect(origin: CGPoint(x: max(0, CGFloat(cgImageWidth) - blance)/2.0, y: max(0, CGFloat(cgImageheight) - blance)/2.0), size: blanceSize)) else { return nil }
        UIBezierPath(ovalIn: blanceRect).addClip()

        UIImage(cgImage: cgImage, scale: 1.0, orientation: self.imageOrientation).draw(in: blanceRect)
        return UIGraphicsGetImageFromCurrentImageContext()
    }

}
| improve this answer | |
1
func cropImage() -> UIImage? {
    let size = min(self.size.width, self.size.height)
    UIGraphicsBeginImageContextWithOptions(CGSize(width: size, height: size), true, 1.0)
    defer { UIGraphicsEndImageContext() }
    self.draw(in: CGRect(x: (size - self.size.width) / 2.0,
                          y: (size - self.size.height) / 2.0,
                          width: self.size.width,
                          height: self.size.height))
    return UIGraphicsGetImageFromCurrentImageContext()
}
| improve this answer | |
0

Solution based on Swift 2 extension. Improvised from @Geoffrey and @Nirav Dangi. Note that we set newCropWidth and newCropHeight to image's width or height when they are lesser than the given width or height.

extension UIImage {
    func imageByCroppingImage(size: CGSize) -> UIImage {
        let newCropWidth, newCropHeight : CGFloat;

        if(self.size.width < self.size.height) {
            if (self.size.width < size.width) {
                newCropWidth = self.size.width;
            }
            else {
                newCropWidth = size.width;
            }
            newCropHeight = (newCropWidth * size.height)/size.width;
        } else {
            if (self.size.height < size.height) {
                newCropHeight = self.size.height;
            }
            else {
                newCropHeight = size.height;
            }
            newCropWidth = (newCropHeight * size.width)/size.height;
        }

        let x = self.size.width / 2 - newCropWidth / 2;
        let y = self.size.height / 2 - newCropHeight / 2;

        let cropRect = CGRectMake(x, y, newCropWidth, newCropHeight);
        let imageRef = CGImageCreateWithImageInRect(self.CGImage, cropRect);

        let croppedImage : UIImage = UIImage(CGImage: imageRef!, scale: 0, orientation: self.imageOrientation);

        return croppedImage;
    }
}
| improve this answer | |
0

i'm dealing with the following

    extension UIImage {

    var cgImageWidth: Int { return cgImage?.width ?? 0 }
    var cgImageheight: Int { return cgImage?.height ?? 0 }
    var blance: CGFloat { return min(size.width, size.height)}
    var blanceSize: CGSize { return CGSize(width: blance, height: blance) }
    var blanceRect: CGRect { return CGRect(origin: .zero, size: blanceSize) }

    var roundedImage: UIImage? {
        UIGraphicsBeginImageContextWithOptions(blanceSize, false, scale)
        defer { UIGraphicsEndImageContext() }
        guard let cgImage = cgImage?.cropping(to: CGRect(origin: CGPoint(x: max(0, CGFloat(cgImageWidth) - blance)/2.0, y: max(0, CGFloat(cgImageheight) - blance)/2.0), size: blanceSize)) else { return nil }
        UIBezierPath(ovalIn: blanceRect).addClip()

        UIImage(cgImage: cgImage, scale: 1.0, orientation: self.imageOrientation).draw(in: blanceRect)
        return UIGraphicsGetImageFromCurrentImageContext()
    }

}
| improve this answer | |
0

Here is the Swift 5 version of cropping the image according to given size from center.

extension UIImage {

     func imageByCroppingImage(size : CGSize) -> UIImage{
        let refWidth : CGFloat = CGFloat(self.cgImage!.width)
        let refHeight : CGFloat = CGFloat(self.cgImage!.height)
        let x = (refWidth - size.width) / 2
        let y = (refHeight - size.height) / 2
        let cropRect = CGRect(x: x, y: y, width: size.width, height: size.height)
        let imageRef = self.cgImage!.cropping(to: cropRect)
        let cropped : UIImage = UIImage(cgImage: imageRef!, scale: 0, orientation: self.imageOrientation)
        return cropped
    }
    }
| improve this answer | |
-3

I was able to accomplish it with something like this:

   UIImage *thisImage = [[UIImage alloc] initWithContentsOfFile:imagePath];
                double x = (thisImage.size.width )/2.0;
                double y = (thisImage.size.height)/2.0;
                mediaImage = [self imageByCropping:thisImage toRect:CGRectMake(x, y, 60, 60)];
                [thisImage release];
| improve this answer | |

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