80

For example I need 5.0 to become 5, or 4.3000 to become 4.3.

3
  • 11
    Note: Unlike the top answer in the linked question, all of these answers rely on an expected input of only one decimal place. Everything longer than one decimal place will be rounded, which may not be desired behaviour.
    – tommoyang
    Commented Jun 4, 2014 at 2:07
  • 1
    This is ugly as hell but it works: String.format(doubleVal).replaceAll("\\.0+$", "");
    – mvmn
    Commented Jan 18, 2019 at 15:55
  • 4
    P.S. Ended up using this: DecimalFormat("#.################").format(doubleVal); // This ensures no trailing zeroes and no separator if fraction part is 0 (there's a special method setDecimalSeparatorAlwaysShown(false) for that, but it seems to be already disabled by default). But will produce up to 16 digits of fractional part (and you can put more # there if you think 16 is not enough).
    – mvmn
    Commented Jan 20, 2019 at 12:38

3 Answers 3

108

You should use DecimalFormat("0.#")


For 4.3000

Double price = 4.3000;
DecimalFormat format = new DecimalFormat("0.#");
System.out.println(format.format(price));

output is:

4.3

In case of 5.000 we have

Double price = 5.000;
DecimalFormat format = new DecimalFormat("0.#");
System.out.println(format.format(price));

And the output is:

5
10
  • 6
    this fails the case of 5.0 becoming 5, as it will always add a .0 to the end of numbers. Commented Jan 7, 2013 at 22:25
  • 2
    Thank you for Your comment. Now I have figured out that I should have used 0.#. Commented Jan 7, 2013 at 22:29
  • 46
    this fails in the case of 4.32 which becomes 4.3 Commented Jan 30, 2014 at 19:29
  • 14
    @Chisko The question asks how to "remove trailing zeros". Commented Feb 1, 2017 at 5:42
  • 3
    A double type can't really do this. If you're willing to switch to BigDecimal, here's the solution.
    – Rok Povsic
    Commented Apr 15, 2019 at 11:36
7

Use DecimalFormat

  double answer = 5.0;
   DecimalFormat df = new DecimalFormat("###.#");
  System.out.println(df.format(answer));
2
  • 14
    Won't this round the numnber like in case of 5.000001
    – VikrantY
    Commented Jun 15, 2014 at 20:40
  • 55
    It does and that's why this is wrong... Commented Mar 3, 2015 at 5:42
1

Use a DecimalFormat object with a format string of "0.#".

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  • 19
    this fails in the case of 4.32 which becomes 4.3
    – narancs
    Commented Mar 31, 2016 at 12:50
  • 1
    fair point, although the OP didn't indicate how many places were desired. I can't think of a good reason to truncate trailing 0's but keep non-zeros as far as they are printable. IMHO, when printing a double, the code should specify the desired number of digits of precision (the number of #'s after the period).
    – dashrb
    Commented Apr 13, 2016 at 13:59
  • 2
    @Karoly DecimalFormat df = new DecimalFormat("###.##"); df.setRoundingMode(RoundingMode.HALF_UP); System.err.println(df.format(4.325)); System.err.println(df.format(4.30)); System.err.println(df.format(4.00));
    – Uncle Iroh
    Commented Jun 30, 2016 at 16:13
  • 2
    @dashrb The OP was very explicit about what he wanted. He wants to remove trailing zeroes. Do you understand what the word "trailing" means? Commented Sep 12, 2020 at 1:06
  • @UncleIroh FYI this provides correct solution even after removing the RoundingMode.HALF_UP but keeping #.### Commented Jan 13, 2021 at 18:04

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