64

I want to draw a grid as shown in image but I totally don't have idea that where should I begin. Should I use SVG or should I use Canvas with HTML5 and how to draw it.
Please guide on this. I want this grid to draw rectangle, circle or other diagrams on it and I will calculate area of that diagram like area of square.

enter image description here

  • You just want to draw a grid? I don't want to trail off in some other direction but I was wondering you could background-repeat a small grid image to display the larger grid. Of course if you want to draw it based on calculations then you are better off using canvas. – Tanzeel Kazi Jan 8 '13 at 5:27
130

SVG can do this nicely using patterns:

<svg width="100%" height="100%" xmlns="http://www.w3.org/2000/svg">
  <defs>
    <pattern id="smallGrid" width="8" height="8" patternUnits="userSpaceOnUse">
      <path d="M 8 0 L 0 0 0 8" fill="none" stroke="gray" stroke-width="0.5"/>
    </pattern>
    <pattern id="grid" width="80" height="80" patternUnits="userSpaceOnUse">
      <rect width="80" height="80" fill="url(#smallGrid)"/>
      <path d="M 80 0 L 0 0 0 80" fill="none" stroke="gray" stroke-width="1"/>
    </pattern>
  </defs>

  <rect width="100%" height="100%" fill="url(#grid)" />
</svg>

I set width and height to 100%, so you can define the actual width and height on use, either for inline SVG:

<div style="width:400px;height:300px">
  <svg width="100%" height="100%" xmlns="http://www.w3.org/2000/svg">
    <defs>
      <pattern id="smallGrid" width="8" height="8" patternUnits="userSpaceOnUse">
        <path d="M 8 0 L 0 0 0 8" fill="none" stroke="gray" stroke-width="0.5"/>
      </pattern>
      <pattern id="grid" width="80" height="80" patternUnits="userSpaceOnUse">
        <rect width="80" height="80" fill="url(#smallGrid)"/>
        <path d="M 80 0 L 0 0 0 80" fill="none" stroke="gray" stroke-width="1"/>
      </pattern>
    </defs>

    <rect width="100%" height="100%" fill="url(#grid)" />
  </svg>
</div>

or an <img> element:

<img src="https://svgshare.com/i/9Eo.svg" width="700" height="200"/>

results in:

<img src="https://svgshare.com/i/9Eo.svg" width="241" height="401"/>

results in

Note that for this particular grid you have to use widths and heights of the form n x 80 + 1 (with n being any integer) if you want the grid to start and end with a thick stroke.

  • If you need a more flexible grid in terms of how wide the distance between grid lines is, or what color, stroke-width and background color are used, this can easily be done as well. Feel free to ask if you need any further help on this. – Thomas W Jan 8 '13 at 6:56
  • I really like this solution. However in firefox and safari if the svg get's stretched really large (by setting with:100% and use a really small viewport) there seem to be rounding errors which cause the small grid and the large grid to not align perfectly: imgur.com/qitOro2 is there a way to fix this? – Laszlo Korte Dec 14 '15 at 13:54
  • It works well with thin lines with when you increase the stroke widths (try with 4.0 for instance), some asymetric issues show on. – Guid Dec 15 '16 at 21:54
  • @ThomasW how do we change how wide the gridlines are? – Gaurav Ramanan Apr 2 '17 at 20:34
10

I am posting my code using canvas here on SO but I am also creating a working sample on JSFiddle here.

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
<head>
    <title>StackOverflow test bed</title>
    <script type="text/javascript">
        function drawGrid() {
            var cnv = document.getElementById("cnv");

            var gridOptions = {
                minorLines: {
                    separation: 5,
                    color: '#00FF00'
                },
                majorLines: {
                    separation: 30,
                    color: '#FF0000'
                }
            };

            drawGridLines(cnv, gridOptions.minorLines);
            drawGridLines(cnv, gridOptions.majorLines);

            return;
        }

        function drawGridLines(cnv, lineOptions) {


            var iWidth = cnv.width;
            var iHeight = cnv.height;

            var ctx = cnv.getContext('2d');

            ctx.strokeStyle = lineOptions.color;
            ctx.strokeWidth = 1;

            ctx.beginPath();

            var iCount = null;
            var i = null;
            var x = null;
            var y = null;

            iCount = Math.floor(iWidth / lineOptions.separation);

            for (i = 1; i <= iCount; i++) {
                x = (i * lineOptions.separation);
                ctx.moveTo(x, 0);
                ctx.lineTo(x, iHeight);
                ctx.stroke();
            }


            iCount = Math.floor(iHeight / lineOptions.separation);

            for (i = 1; i <= iCount; i++) {
                y = (i * lineOptions.separation);
                ctx.moveTo(0, y);
                ctx.lineTo(iWidth, y);
                ctx.stroke();
            }

            ctx.closePath();

            return;
        }

    </script>
</head>
<body onload="drawGrid()">
    <canvas id="cnv" width="500" height="500"></canvas>
</body>
</html>

Using the canvas approach you can make the grid size dynamic by changing the separation parameter.

However, if your grid size is going to be static I feel that maybe you don't need to draw the grid. Just for the sake of displaying a grid to the user you could use CSS to repeat a background image as demonstrated in the fiddle here. That will also be good on page performance.

  • Is it possible to reduce the stroke width on these lines? I've tried using a number less than 1. Works great in the SVG example above but I cant replicate the crispness of it with this Canvas solution. – JohnDevelops Oct 27 '15 at 11:28
  • 1
    The crispness you are referring to is because of how canvas renders lines. Refer to this article mobtowers.com/html5-canvas-crisp-lines-every-time. Also have an updated jsFiddle for you jsfiddle.net/B2EBw/137 – Tanzeel Kazi Oct 27 '15 at 18:31
6

In the interest of coverage, how about a CSS based approach?

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
  <head>
      <style>
      html {
        height: 100%;
      }

      body {
        margin: 0;
        padding: 0;
        height: 100%;
        background-color: #434343;    
        background-size: 75px 75px;
        background-image: linear-gradient(0deg, transparent 24%, rgba(255, 255, 255, .05) 25%, rgba(255, 255, 255, .05) 26%, transparent 27%, transparent 74%, rgba(255, 255, 255, .05) 75%, rgba(255, 255, 255, .05) 76%, transparent 77%, transparent), linear-gradient(90deg, transparent 24%, rgba(255, 255, 255, .05) 25%, rgba(255, 255, 255, .05) 26%, transparent 27%, transparent 74%, rgba(255, 255, 255, .05) 75%, rgba(255, 255, 255, .05) 76%, transparent 77%, transparent);
      }

      canvas {
          width:100%;
          height:100%;
          position:absolute;

          background-color: transparent;
          background-size: 15px 15px;
          background-image: linear-gradient(0deg, transparent 24%, rgba(255, 255, 255, .05) 25%, rgba(255, 255, 255, .05) 26%, transparent 27%, transparent 74%, rgba(255, 255, 255, .05) 75%, rgba(255, 255, 255, .05) 76%, transparent 77%, transparent), linear-gradient(90deg, transparent 24%, rgba(255, 255, 255, .05) 25%, rgba(255, 255, 255, .05) 26%, transparent 27%, transparent 74%, rgba(255, 255, 255, .05) 75%, rgba(255, 255, 255, .05) 76%, transparent 77%, transparent);
      }

      </style>
  </head>
  <body>
      <canvas></canvas>
  </body>
</html>
4

it's very easy to do using canvas, that's what I recommend. I'm responding quickly on mobile here, but you should get the idea even if the psuedocode below isn't EXACTLY right:

you'll have a loop something like:

// "Ctx" is your canvas context
// "Width," "Height," and other vars that start with a capital letter are set according
//   to your canvas size or preference

var i;
for (i=0; i < Height; i += GridSize) {
   ctx.lineWidth(1.0+((i%10)==0));
   ctx.moveTo(0,i);
   ctx.lineTo(Width,i);
   ctx.stroke();
}
for (i=0; i < Width; i += GridSize) {
   ctx.lineWidth(1.0+((i%10)==0));
   ctx.moveTo(i,0);
   ctx.lineTo(i,Height);
   ctx.stroke();
}

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.