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Possible Duplicate:
How do you cast a List of objects from one type to another in Java?

Searched the internet a little, and found no nice way of doing it... My solution now is:

public class A {}
List<Object> obj = new ArrayList<Object>();
obj.add(new A());
// Ugly solution here:
List<A> a = (List<A>) (List) obj;

But this is quite ugly and gets a warning. No "official" way of doing this?

EDIT: To the guys who closed this: I was aware of the solution posted in How do you cast a List of objects from one type to another in Java? It is the same as the one I posted in my question (just adding the <?> after the first cast does exactly the same) I Was looking for something more "clean". In the direction of using the Class<?> clazz = listobj.get(0).getClass way of getting the class and casting to the correct class at runtime (but no idea if something like that works... Eclipse doesn't seem to like it anyway...)

marked as duplicate by soulcheck, SztupY, Frank van Puffelen, Grizzly, Anders R. Bystrup Jan 8 '13 at 12:59

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

  • 3
    Why are you creating a List<Object> in the first place? – Adam Arold Jan 8 '13 at 9:38
  • @AdamArold Thank you for your answer. Yes I should have been more specific: The List<Object> come from the fact that I'm fetching in a database with JDBC and that I don't necessarily know the datatype that will come out. Obviously I'm not creating List<Object> for fun ^^ – reverse_engineer Jan 8 '13 at 15:42
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List<Object> obj = new ArrayList<Object>();
obj.add(new A());

It is not the right way to write code. Basically you are creating a generic List and adding Object to it and it type unsafe and keep any Object type.

List<Object> obj = new ArrayList<Object>();
obj.add(new A());
obj.add(new String("str"));
obj.add(1);

It is recommended to create type-safe List like List<A> obj = new ArrayList<A>();

you can do this in such a way -

public <T>List<T> castCollection(List srcList, Class<T> clas){
    List<T> list =new ArrayList<T>();
    for (Object obj : srcList) {
    if(obj!=null && clas.isAssignableFrom(obj.getClass()))
        list.add(clas.cast(obj));
    }
    return list;
}
  • Thank you for your answer. Yes I should have been more specific: The List<Object> come from the fact that I'm fetching in a database with JDBC and that I don't necessarily know the datatype that will come out. Obviously I'm not creating List<Object> for fun ^^ – reverse_engineer Jan 8 '13 at 15:40
  • Answer updated. – Subhrajyoti Majumder Jan 9 '13 at 5:36
  • Thank you for your answer. Yes this seems like a solution that will go in the direction that I like. I'll check it out. Since this is the best answer I got I'll validate it. Thanks! – reverse_engineer Jan 9 '13 at 9:15
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So why isn't your list declared as

List<A> obj = new ArrayList<A>();

to begin with ?

It's really dangerous to do what you're trying to do. What you're saying is that your list contains As and subclasses thereof. But since it's originally a list of Objects (i.e. anything). You're likely to get a nasty surprise later on.

What that compiler error really means is that somewhere you have a design issue.

  • 2
    Downvoted why ? – Brian Agnew Jan 8 '13 at 9:40
  • 3
    +1 This is the nice way of doing it, even if it's not what the OP is looking for. – Peter Lawrey Jan 8 '13 at 9:44
  • @BrianAgnew Thank you for your answer. Yes maybe I'm having a design flaw then, but when I use apache's commons-dbutils-1.5.jar for JDBC, I designed it that way that it can fetch any data type from databases. Hence the List<Object>. But for later use, I need to cast them to their java type... Am I using JDBC completely wrong here then? (I have no experience with it, just started coding :)) – reverse_engineer Jan 8 '13 at 15:35
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Perhaps the issue is that you want to put objects of different (but inheritance-related) types into the list? In that case, you read the Generics Tutorial, especially the parts about <? extends Something> and <? super Something>

Cheers,

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