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I need to write a regular expression to match the following pattern :

fltr_desc_name

that is.. "fltr" followed by an underscore followed by any number of words separated by underscore.

for example: I need a regular expression to match the following :

fltr_desc_name
fltr_nameone_nametwo
fltr_level_name_desc

and I am using it inside an "if" statement in "awk": for ex:

awk '/Transformation/ { if ($4=="Filter" && $5=="fltr_*") print $4,$5 }' filename  

please help me in writing the regular expression and tell me how to use regular expression inside an "if" condition inside "awk" command. Thank you.

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  • 1
    what you have tried so far!! and why regular expression. use string function for that
    – diEcho
    Jan 8, 2013 at 10:34
  • Hello :) , I am using the regex to find all lines whose tranformation field type is Filter, (ie $4, 4th field as given in file) and $5 is name of filter that shld b of the format "fltr_followedbyanywrdsseparatedbyunderscore". and so I was using the awk cmd as shown in the question, but i was unable to mactch the lines.
    – Karthik
    Jan 8, 2013 at 11:26

6 Answers 6

23

Need to use tilde character ~/ / in matching regular expressions in awk, i.e.

if ($5 ~ /fltr_*/)
0
8
awk '/Transformation/ && $4=="Filter" && $5~/^fltr_[[:alpha:]_]+/ { print $4,$5 }' filename
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  • 1
    +1 for using the locale-aware character class. For generality, I'd use [:alnum:] even though it wasn't stated. Jan 8, 2013 at 14:26
  • 1
    The OP stated the string contained "words separated by underscore" and, in my head at least, words don't contain numbers but YMMV I suppose.
    – Ed Morton
    Jan 8, 2013 at 14:29
  • I can see that, particularly given the example fltr_nameone_nametwo but it's not a stretch to extend that to fltr_name1_name2 Jan 8, 2013 at 14:31
  • Yup, in case of just words, [:alnum:]. if numbers hv to be included along with words , then ill opt for [:alnum:]. Thanks for your suggestions guys. cheers
    – Karthik
    Jan 10, 2013 at 6:31
7

You could use

awk '/Transformation/ && $4=="Filter" && match($5, /^fltr_[A-Za-z_]+/) { print $4,$5 }' filename

No need to use an if statement, you can just use multiple matching conditions as per above. match returns the match location of the regex ^fltr_[A-Za-z_]+ in $5, or 0 if there is none. 0 evaluates to false and anything else to true.

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  • 3
    @Karthik The match() is unnecessary. Your main problem was just that you were using a string comparison operator (==) instead of an RE comparison operator (~). I'll post the real solution.
    – Ed Morton
    Jan 8, 2013 at 13:43
  • @EdMorton, nice - was looking for a regex operator in man awk but it wasn't listed among the other operators so I missed it and went for match instead. Thanks! Jan 8, 2013 at 15:02
  • @EdMorton, Yup. Thank you. But I needed to use regular expressions say inside the "awk" command. i.e, $5=="fil_".. "fil_" was supposed to be a regex and I didnt know the syntax to include it under "awk" command. I believe "$5==fil_" without the match() function, "fil_" was considered as a string and not as a pattern. If i am wrong, please correct me coz I am new to shell scripting.
    – Karthik
    Jan 10, 2013 at 6:11
  • 1
    As i said the RE comparison operator is '~'. You also want to use /fil_/, not "fil_", so fil_* is treated as a RE constant and not as a string in an RE comparison. See gnu.org/software/gawk/manual/gawk.html#Regexp-Operators.
    – Ed Morton
    Jan 10, 2013 at 15:42
  • @EdMorton Ok, I understood now :) Thanks a lot.
    – Karthik
    Jan 15, 2013 at 15:18
1

fltr_[a-zA-Z_]+[a-zA-Z]

or if you want to match from string start to string end only:

^fltr_[a-zA-Z_]+[a-zA-Z]$

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  • +1 for not ending with an underscore, even though it was not stated explicitly Jan 8, 2013 at 14:25
  • @sharp12345, Thank you for your reply. :)
    – Karthik
    Jan 10, 2013 at 6:21
0

you could just use fltr_\w+

if you need a good program for writing and testing regex. try this one: http://gskinner.com/RegExr/

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  • @selltheworld Thank you for your suggestion and also the link :)
    – Karthik
    Jan 10, 2013 at 6:22
0

Try this

^fltr[_\d\w]+$

It will take all, you need.

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