50

I have a set of <span> elements (each of them is nested to correspondent <div>). They build a stack of panels, like in the picture below.

enter image description here

When span contains some text, it has a normal height. But when it is empty, it's height is 0px. But I need it to have a normal height (to make it look like in the picture).

How to achive this behavior? (I tried to insert a space, but maybe there's a better solution).

7
  • 1
    How about min-height? I believe where will be issues with ie6, but all other browsers should work ok.
    – Morpheus
    Commented Jan 8, 2013 at 15:07
  • Which value for min-height should I use? How to get default line height?
    – Roman
    Commented Jan 8, 2013 at 15:11
  • line height is usually 1.2em
    – Loris
    Commented Jan 8, 2013 at 15:14
  • take a look line-height
    – Morpheus
    Commented Jan 8, 2013 at 15:18
  • 2
    Wouldn't setting the content of an empty div to &nbsp; do exactly this?
    – Izhaki
    Commented Oct 9, 2014 at 22:09

4 Answers 4

120

Here is a simple and robust solution:

span.item:empty:before {
  content: "\200b"; // unicode zero width space character
}

(Update 12/18/2015: rather than using \00a0 non-breaking space, use \200b, which is also a non-breaking space, but with zero width. See my other answer at https://stackoverflow.com/a/29355130/516910)

This CSS selector only selects the spans that are "empty", and injects some content into that empty space, namely a non-breaking space character. So no matter what font size and line-height you have set, everything around that <span> will fall into line, just as if you had text present in that <span>, which is probably what you want.

http://plnkr.co/edit/eXHphA?p=preview

The result looks like this:

correct resulting layout


I see two problems with using min-height:

  1. it is vulnerable where font sizes change
  2. the text baseline is not in the correct place

Here's what the counter-examples look like when things go wrong:

  1. The font size changes, and now you have to hand tune the min-height again. You can't use the same class to support different parts of your website where font sizes are different. Here the font size in this place is 30, but the min-height is still set to 20. So the empty spans are not as tall. :-(

http://plnkr.co/edit/zeEvca?p=preview

font-size is 30, but min-height is 20. oops.

  1. Your empty span has the correct height with min-height, but it doesn't line up correctly with the text surrounding the span. The baseline falls incorrectly. Look at the line that says "Huh?" below:

http://plnkr.co/edit/GGd7mz?p=preview

how baseline fails

Code for this last example:

<div class="group">
  Hello <span class="item">Text</span>
</div>
<div class="group">
  Huh? <span class="item"></span>
</div>
<div class="group">
  Yes! <span class="correct"></span>
</div>

css:

.group {
  background-color: #f1f1f1;
  padding: 5px;
  font-size: 20px;
  margin-bottom: 20px;
}

.item {
  background-color: #d2e3c5;
  border-radius: 6px;
  padding: 10px;
  margin-bottom:5px;
  display: inline-block;
  min-height: 20px;
}

.correct {
  background-color: #d2e3c5;
  border-radius: 6px;
  padding: 10px;
  margin-bottom:5px;
  display: inline-block;
}
.correct:empty:before {
  content: "\00a0";
}
3
  • Mention it to the original poster in their question's comments, perhaps they will update the selected answer.
    – broc.seib
    Commented Mar 23, 2016 at 13:12
  • 1
    This is a gem of a CSS rule! Eliminates so many classic &nbsp; hacks from the past Commented Aug 10, 2017 at 18:17
  • Good answer! Link to Wikipedia ( en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zero-width_space ).
    – vee
    Commented May 5, 2021 at 13:47
10

You could set span display:inline-block; and then add min-height

1
  • 1
    min-height might be a suitable quick and dirty solution. I see two possible problems with min-height: font-size and baseline, to which I offer a robust solution below.
    – broc.seib
    Commented Mar 30, 2015 at 19:42
2

From the picture, it seems that you have already set display: block on the span elements. If not, add that. Alternatively, consider using div instead. The difference between the two elements is that span is inline by default, div is block by default, so why not use the latter?

Then you need to set min-height to a value that equals the height of items that have content. This is normally determined by their line height. The default line height varies by font (and by browser), so to get consistent results, set the line height explicitly, e.g.

* { line-height: 1.25; }
span { min-height: 1.25em; }
0

Maybe this will work -

span{
  min-height:16px;
}
1
  • 2
    Note that inline element cannot have height defined
    – Loris
    Commented Jan 8, 2013 at 15:13

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