6698

How do I return the response/result from a function foo that makes an asynchronous request?

I am trying to return the value from the callback, as well as assigning the result to a local variable inside the function and returning that one, but none of those ways actually return the response — they all return undefined or whatever the initial value of the variable result is.

Example of an asynchronous function that accepts a callback (using jQuery's ajax function):

function foo() {
    var result;

    $.ajax({
        url: '...',
        success: function(response) {
            result = response;
            // return response; // <- I tried that one as well
        }
    });

    return result; // It always returns `undefined`
}

Example using Node.js:

function foo() {
    var result;

    fs.readFile("path/to/file", function(err, data) {
        result = data;
        // return data; // <- I tried that one as well
    });

    return result; // It always returns `undefined`
}

Example using the then block of a promise:

function foo() {
    var result;

    fetch(url).then(function(response) {
        result = response;
        // return response; // <- I tried that one as well
    });

    return result; // It always returns `undefined`
}
4
  • use deasync like this stackoverflow.com/a/47051880/2083877 Sep 8, 2021 at 11:26
  • 17
    @SunilKumar I don't think this is useful. OP made this question and self-answer to document how to get the response from async calls. Suggesting a 3rd party module defeats such purpose, and IMO the paradigm introduced by that module is not good practice.
    – Seblor
    Sep 10, 2021 at 9:14
  • 7
    @Liam: It's just an example for an asynchronous function that accepts a callback. Oct 15, 2021 at 14:13
  • Promises provide a cleaner and more structured way to deal with asynchronous operations. You can create promise that represents the result of the asynchronous call. The promise can be resolved with the response or rejected with an error. Jul 27, 2023 at 6:32

42 Answers 42

1
2
31

After reading all the responses here and with my experiences, I would like to resume the detail of callback, promise and async/await for the asynchronous programming in JavaScript.

1) Callback: The fundamental reason for a callback is to run code in response of an event (see the example below). We use callback in JavaScript every time.

const body = document.getElementsByTagName('body')[0];
function callback() {
  console.log('Hello');
}
body.addEventListener('click', callback);

But if you must use many nested callbacks in the example below, it will be fairy terrible for the code refactoring.

asyncCallOne(function callback1() {
  asyncCallTwo(function callback2() {
    asyncCallThree(function callback3() {
        ...
    })
  })
})

2) Promise: a syntax ES6 - Promise resolves the callback hell issue!

const myFirstPromise = new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
  // We call resolve(...) when what we were doing asynchronously was successful, and reject(...) when it failed.
  // In this example, we use setTimeout(...) to simulate async code.
  // In reality, you will probably be using something like XHR request or an HTML5 API.
  setTimeout(() => {
    resolve("Success!")  // Yay! Everything went well!
  }, 250)
})

myFirstPromise
  .then((res) => {
    return res.json();
  })
  .then((data) => {
    console.log(data);
  })
  .catch((e) => {
    console.log(e);
  });

myFirstPromise is a Promise instance that represents the process of async codes. The resolve function signals that the Promise instance has finished. Afterwards, we can call .then() (a chain of .then as you want) and .catch() on the promise instance:

then — Runs a callback you pass to it when the promise has fulfilled.
catch — Runs a callback you pass to it when something went wrong.

3) Async/Await: a new syntax ES6 - Await is basically syntactic sugar for Promise!

The Async function provides us with a clean and concise syntax that enables us to write less code to accomplish the same outcome we would get with promises. Async/Await looks similar to synchronous code, and synchronous code is much easier to read and write. To catch errors with Async/Await, we can use the block try...catch. In here, you don't need to write a chain of .then() of Promise syntax.

const getExchangeRate = async () => {
  try {
    const res = await fetch('https://getExchangeRateData');
    const data = await res.json();
    console.log(data);
  } catch (err) {
    console.error(err);
  }
}

getExchangeRate();

Conclusion: These are totally the three syntaxes for asynchronous programming in JavaScript that you should well understand. So if possible, I recommend that you should use "promise" or "async/await" for refactoring your asynchronous codes (mostly for XHR requests) !

1
  • Hi, although this answer's contents are accurate, it really doesn't answer OP's question (which is how to return something from an asynchronous call?) Aug 25, 2020 at 12:02
30

Rather than throwing code at you, there are two concepts that are key to understanding how JavaScript handles callbacks and asynchronicity (is that even a word?)

The Event Loop and Concurrency Model

There are three things you need to be aware of; The queue; the event loop and the stack

In broad, simplistic terms, the event loop is like the project manager, it is constantly listening for any functions that want to run and communicates between the queue and the stack.

while (queue.waitForMessage()) {
  queue.processNextMessage();
}

Once it receives a message to run something it adds it to the queue. The queue is the list of things that are waiting to execute (like your AJAX request). imagine it like this:

  1. call foo.com/api/bar using foobarFunc
  2. Go perform an infinite loop ... and so on

When one of these messages is going to execute it pops the message from the queue and creates a stack, the stack is everything JavaScript needs to execute to perform the instruction in the message. So in our example it's being told to call foobarFunc

function foobarFunc (var) {
  console.log(anotherFunction(var));
}

So anything that foobarFunc needs to execute (in our case anotherFunction) will get pushed onto the stack. executed, and then forgotten about - the event loop will then move onto the next thing in the queue (or listen for messages)

The key thing here is the order of execution. That is

WHEN is something going to run

When you make a call using AJAX to an external party or run any asynchronous code (a setTimeout for example), JavaScript is dependant upon a response before it can proceed.

The big question is when will it get the response? The answer is we don't know - so the event loop is waiting for that message to say "hey run me". If JavaScript just waited around for that message synchronously your app would freeze and it will suck. So JavaScript carries on executing the next item in the queue whilst waiting for the message to get added back to the queue.

That's why with asynchronous functionality we use things called callbacks. - A function or handler that, when passed into another function, will be executed at a later date. A promise uses callbacks (functions passed to .then() for example) as a way to reason about this asynchronous behaviour in a more linear way. The promise is a way of saying "I promise to return something at some point" and the callback is how we handle that value that is eventually returned. jQuery uses specific callbacks called deffered.done deffered.fail and deffered.always (amongst others). You can see them all here

So what you need to do is pass a function that is promised to execute at some point with data that is passed to it.

Because a callback is not executed immediately but at a later time it's important to pass the reference to the function not it executed. so

function foo(bla) {
  console.log(bla)
}

so most of the time (but not always) you'll pass foo not foo()

Hopefully that will make some sense. When you encounter things like this that seem confusing - i highly recommend reading the documentation fully to at least get an understanding of it. It will make you a much better developer.

3
  • I am struggling to accept "callbacks are kind of like promises". it's like saying "flour is kind of like bread" but it is not. you use flour, water and other incredients, mix them and eventually after a process, bread is the results.
    – Eva Cohen
    Jan 17, 2021 at 19:08
  • 1
    This is true - I think I was try to say something that doesnt quite read what I was meaning. A promise in JS evidently represents something different to a callback, however when programming any kind asynchronous functionality you are going to be executing a callback. A promise represents the value but the callback is what we need to do something with that value, at some point in the future, when it returns. Jan 18, 2021 at 15:58
  • 1
    A promise is mostly useless (but not always) without a callback to do something with the resolved value Jan 18, 2021 at 15:59
27

Here is an example that works:

const validateName = async userName => {
  const url = "https://jsonplaceholder.typicode.com/todos/1";
  try {
    const response = await axios.get(url);
    return response.data
  } catch (err) {
    return false;
  }
};

validateName("user")
 .then(data => console.log(data))
 .catch(reason => console.log(reason.message))
.as-console-wrapper { max-height: 100% !important; top: 0; }
<script src=
"https://cdnjs.cloudflare.com/ajax/libs/axios/0.21.1/axios.min.js"></script>

1
24

Await

A request works in an asynchronous way, so you can't read the data synchronously as in typical code. However, using async/await you can create asynchronous code which looks close/similar to the usual synchronous/sequential style. Code which processes response data needs to be wrapped by an async function (load in the below snippet) and inside it you need to add the await keyword before foo() (which also uses async/await).

async function foo() {
  var url = 'https://jsonplaceholder.typicode.com/todos/1';
  var result = (await fetch(url)).text(); // Or .json()
  return result;
}

async function load() {
  var result = await foo();
  console.log(result);
}

load();

Remember that an async function always (implicitly) wraps its result into a promise (so it returns a promise).

1
17

Let's see the forest first before looking at the trees.

There are many informative answers with great details here, I won't repeat any of them. The key to programming in JavaScript is having first the correct mental model of overall execution.

  1. Your entry point(s) is executed as the result of an event. For example, a script tag with code is loaded into the browser. (Accordingly, this is why you may need to be concerned with the readiness of the page to run your code if it requires DOM elements to be constructed first, etc.)
  2. Your code executes to completion--however many asynchronous calls it makes--without executing any of your callbacks, including XHR requests, set timeouts, DOM event handlers, etc. Each of those callbacks waiting to be executed will sit in a queue, waiting their turn to be run after other events that fired have all finished execution.
  3. Each individual callback to an XHR request, set timeout or DOM the event once invoked will then run to completion.

The good news is that if you understand this point well, you will never have to worry about race conditions. You should first and foremost thing of how you want to organize your code as essentially the response to different discrete events, and how you want to thread them together into a logical sequence. You can use promises or higher level new async/await as tools to that end, or you can roll your own.

But you shouldn't use any tactical tools to solve a problem until you are comfortable with the actual problem domain. Draw a map of these dependencies to know what needs to run when. Attempting an ad-hoc approach to all these callbacks is just not going to serve you well.

14

There is no way you can directly return the result of an Ajax response from a function. The reason is that an Ajax call ($.get() or $.post()) is asynchronous and calling the function that encapsulates the Ajax call would return even before the response is rendered.

In such scenarios, the only option is to return a promise object, to be resolved when the response arrives.

There are two ways by which the above issue can be resolved. Both make use of a promise.

The code snippets below include a JSON URL. Both work and can be directly copied to JSFiddle and tested.

Option #1 - return the Ajax call directly from the foo method.
In the latest version of jQuery, an Ajax call returns a promise object, which can be resolved using a .then function. In code, the .then function is preceded by the call back function to be resolved, foo() in this case.

   // Declare function foo
   function foo(url)
   {
     return $.get(url);
   }

   // Invoke the foo function, which returns a promise object
   // the 'then' function accepts the call back to the resolve function
   foo('https://jsonplaceholder.typicode.com/todos/1')
     .then(function(response)
     {
       console.log(response);
     })
.as-console-wrapper { max-height: 100% !important; top: 0; }
<script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/3.6.0/jquery.min.js"></script>

Option #2 - declare a promise object and return it.
Declare a promise object inside the function, encapsulate the Ajax call within that promise function and return the promise object.

   function foo1() {
     var promise = new Promise(function(resolve, reject)
     {
       $.ajax({
       url: 'https://jsonplaceholder.typicode.com/todos/1',
       success: function(response) {
           console.log(response);
           resolve(response);
           // return response; // <- I tried that one as well
         }
       });
     });
     return promise;
   }

   foo1()
   .then(function(response)
   {
     console.log('Promise resolved:');
     console.log(response);
   })
.as-console-wrapper { max-height: 100% !important; top: 0; }
<script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/3.6.0/jquery.min.js"></script>

10

Originally, callbacks were used for asynchronous operations (e.g., in the XMLHttpRequest API). Now promise-based APIs like the browser's Fetch API have become the default solution and the nicer async/await syntax is supported by all modern browsers and on Node.js (server side).

A common scenario - fetching JSON data from the server - can look like this:

async function fetchResource(url) {
  const res = await fetch(url);
  if (!res.ok) {
    throw new Error(res.statusText);
  }
  return res.json();
}

To use it in another function:

async function doSomething() {
  try {
    const data = await fetchResource("https://example.test/resource/1");
    // ...
  } catch (e) {
    // Handle error
    ...
  }
}

If you design a modern API, it is strongly recommended to prefer promise-based style over callbacks. If you inherited an API that relies on callbacks, it is possible to wrap it as a promise:

function sleep(timeout) {
  return new Promise((resolve) => {
    setTimeout(() => {
      resolve();
    }, timeout);
  });
}

async function fetchAfterTwoSeconds(url) {
  await sleep(2000);
  return fetchResource(url);
}

In Node.js, which historically relied exclusively on callbacks, that technique is so common that they added a helper function called util.promisify.

9

I think no matter what method or mechanism used, or whatever the framework is (Angular/React) that hides it from you, the following principle holds:

  1. In the flow of the program (think code or even the lowest level: machine code), the data may not arrive back 2 seconds later, 3 seconds later, or may not arrive at all, so there is no usual return to use in order to return the data.

  2. It is the classic "observer pattern". (It can be in the form of a "callback".) It is: "hey, I am interested in knowing a successful arrival of data; would you let me know when it does." So you register an observer to be notified (or a function to be called to notify about the successful arrival of the data.) You also usually register an observer for the failure of arrival of such data.

  3. When it is successful arrival of data, or a failure of the return of such data, the registered observers (or callbacks) are notified together with the data (or called with the data). If the observer is registered in the form of a callback function foo, then foo(data) will be called. If the observer is registered in the form of an object foo, then depending on the interface, it could be that foo.notify(data) is called.

4
  • what do you mean by "It is the classic observer pattern". callback is not the classic observer pattern. maybe promise is a variation of the classic observer pattern, or a variation of PubSub, etc . . but by no means callback itself. at least the way I see it. Do you claim all kinds of async patterns are implementation of the classic observer pattern ? (event RXJS Observable isn't. even though rxjs.subject is)
    – Eva Cohen
    Jan 17, 2021 at 19:50
  • I mean it in the way that "result is not ready, and let me know when it is ready (or has changed)" So for the question "How do I return the response from an asynchronous call?", it is "using a mechanism to get notified when there is result". I guess you can say it is different because observer pattern can be invoked many times but this "callback" or "promise" is only one time? I focus on the "notify me in the future when it is ready", instead of "how many times it can get called". Jan 19, 2021 at 4:43
  • well I argue only about your naming, the choice of words. that callback is 'the classic observer pattern' which is a very specific design pattern that you can say Promise is a variation of. but callback (although it's a tool for notifying) is not the classic observer pattern. in promise we can push subscribers that will get notified when the promise settles, but callback is more like an atomic unit and not a pattern, IMHO.
    – Eva Cohen
    Jan 19, 2021 at 7:04
  • 1
    ok it is about the naming... what I wanted to put through was, it is the classic "notify me when ready" kind of pattern Jan 19, 2021 at 7:08
4

Use of async/await with a transpilers like Babel to get it working in older browsers. You’ll also have to install this Babel preset and polyfill from npm: npm i -D babel-preset-env babel-polyfill.

function getData(ajaxurl) { 
  return $.ajax({
    url: ajaxurl,
    type: 'GET',
  });
};

async test() {
  try {
    const res = await getData('https://api.icndb.com/jokes/random')
    console.log(res)
  } catch(err) {
    console.log(err);
  }
}

test();

Or the .then callback is just another way to write the same logic.

getData(ajaxurl).then(function(res) {
    console.log(res)
}
0
-1

async: false

I solved it by setting async to false and restructure my Ajax call:

I set a global function called sendRequest(type, url, data) with three parameters to be called every time everywhere:

function sendRequest(type, url, data) {
    let returnValue = null;
    $.ajax({
        url: url,
        type: type,
        async: false,
        data: data,
        dataType: 'json',
        success: function (resp) {
            returnValue = resp;
        }
    });
    return returnValue;
}

Now call the function:

let password = $("#password").val();
        let email = $("#email").val();
        let data = {
            email: email,
            password: password,
        };
        let  resp =  sendRequest('POST', 'http://localhost/signin')}}", data);
        console.log(resp);

Important Note in code is : async: false

If this solution is not working with you, please note this may not working in some of browsers or jQuery versions.

3
  • This technically solves the issue, but note that this is not recommended because it will freeze the window until the request completes. It's better to learn how to deal with the asynchronous nature of JS than to use synchronous versions of IO-related functions.
    – Matt Welke
    Dec 31, 2020 at 18:44
  • 5
    Using async:false is a terrible practice and should never ever be used. It was deprecated by browser vendors years before this answer was written. They even give you warnings in dev tools console not to use it when it is encountered
    – charlietfl
    Mar 27, 2021 at 0:38
  • This is not AJAX, this is SJAX.
    – Michael M.
    Jan 15, 2023 at 22:42
-1

I follow these two ways Promises and async/await

Promises:

function makeAsyncCall() {
  return new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
    setTimeout(() => {
      const response = 'Async response';
      resolve(response);
    }, 2000);
  });
}

makeAsyncCall()
  .then(response => {
    console.log(response); 
  })
  .catch(error => {
    console.error(error); 
  });

And async/await:

async function makeAsyncCall() {
  return new Promise((resolve, reject) => {
    setTimeout(() => {
      const response = 'Async response';
      resolve(response);
    }, 2000);
  });
}

async function handleAsyncCall() {
  try {
    const response = await makeAsyncCall();
    console.log(response); 
  } catch (error) {
    console.error(error); 
  }
}

handleAsyncCall();

-1

In JS, when an asynchronous function is called, it returns a Promise. If you want to return a value from the function, you need to ensure you are properly handling this Promise.

There is an example:

async function foo() {
  var res;
  await asyncRequest().then(function(response) {
    res = response;
  });
  return res;
}

// Call the function and handle it's result:

foo().then(function(res) {
  console.log(res);
});

In the above code, foo is an asynchronous function which makes an asynchronous request. The await keyword is used to pause the execution of the function until the Promise is resolved 🤚. Once the Promise is resolved, the response is assigned to the result variable, that then returned by the function.

When calling the function, since it returns a Promise, you need to use .then() to handle the result after the Promise is resolved.

async function bar() {
  var res = await foo();
  console.log(res);
}

Remember, you can only use await inside an async function(). If you’re not in an async function and want to use await, you will get a syntax error.

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