9

When measurements are specified in cm or inches for an element, it is printed at exactly that size from Firefox and Internet Explorer. Chrome on the other hand makes the elements bigger.

Is there anyway to make Chrome print things at exactly the specified size, or is it something I'll just have to live with?

E.g.

<!doctype html>
<html>
  <head>
    <style type="text/css">
        div.box {
          border: 1px solid black;
          width: 5cm;
        }
    </style>
  </head>
  <body>
    <div class="box">box</div>
  </body>
</html>

The above code prints an exact 5cm (on my printer) in both Firefox and IE, but prints at about 5.5cm from Chrome.

  • @JukkaK.Korpela Completely separate issue. The problem on that question was margins and paddings. This is NOT relevant here. – Vincent McNabb Jan 8 '13 at 22:17
  • @JukkaK.Korpela : Your answer on the other question was not the person's problem. Also, your printer not being 15cm was probably due to the printer being inaccurate. This is a browser-specific issue. I am not having problems with Firefox/IE, but I am with Chrome. Please read and comprehend properly before voting to close. – Vincent McNabb Jan 8 '13 at 22:23
  • I'm having the same problem. Did you ever get this resolved? – Kevin Swarts Feb 26 '14 at 19:09
3
0

The solution with a 100% wide div doesn't work for me on the current Chrome version, but this works, for an A4 paper:

html, body {
    width: 210mm;
}
| improve this answer | |
2
0

I have found this issue too.

After playing with MANY wasted sheets of paper, I've found that Chrome tries to scale the HTML.

For example, add a full width div to your sample below and it'll resize the box correctly, because you're asking Chrome to make the box 100% of the page and thus forcing a 1:1 scale of the page.

<!doctype html>
<html>
  <head>
    <style type="text/css">
        div.box {
          border: 1px solid black;
          width: 5cm;
        }
        div.forcer {
          width: 100%;
          height: 1px;
          border: 1px dotted green;
        }
    </style>
  </head>
  <body>
    <div class="box">box</div>
    <div class="forcer"></div>
  </body>
</html>

Unfortunately, when I tried this, it didn't fix the height issue, but also I couldn't make the box 0px without it losing correct scaling.

Incidentally, take a look at the following to show how it affects the sizes when printed.

<!doctype html>
<html>
  <head>
    <style type="text/css">
        div.box {
          border: 1px solid black;
          width: 5cm;
        }
        div.forcer {
          width: 200%;
          height: 1px;
          border: 1px dotted green;
        }
    </style>
  </head>
  <body>
    <div class="box">box</div>
    <div class="forcer"></div>
  </body>
</html>

In a nutshell: Chrome's printing capabilities are shocking!

Firefox works far better for printing, but runs much slower.

| improve this answer | |
1
0

For Chrome, just set the print margins to something, and set the body to the width of the paper, minus the margins.

E.g. For an A4 page, the width is 210mm

So for 1 inch margins (roughly 2.5cm) you can do the following

@media print
{
    @page
    {
        margin-left: 25mm;
        margin-right: 25mm;
    }

    body
    {
        width: 160mm;
    }
}

The left, right, and width of the body should add up to 210mm.

For letter you'd use 1 inch margins, and a 6.5 inch width on the body.

| improve this answer | |
0
0

I confirmed that I had the same issue when using your HTML, even when trying to specify some CSS rules to get rid of obvious suspects like padding and margins. From the research I've done, it looks like you're simply dealing with inconsistent browser standards when rendering media queries. If possible, I would recommend conditionally styling the box based on browser.

One other aspect seems to be that not specifying a Doctype (which is a bit of a no-no in development anyway) can lead to inconsistencies.

You can go ahead and see this topic for some more reading about the issue:

Firefox versus webkit measurements for media queries based on width

| improve this answer | |
  • The doctype thing is simply because it is a snippet. Usually, I would also use external style sheets. Didn't matter for this example though. The media query part also doesn't matter, so I've removed that and added a doctype. Doesn't make any difference to it working or not though. – Vincent McNabb Jan 8 '13 at 21:52
  • The linked stackoverflow question talks about using different styles for different page sizes, as some browsers include the width of the scrollbar in the page size, and others do not. Which is a completely separate issue. – Vincent McNabb Jan 8 '13 at 21:59
  • Check out the linked possible duplicate put up by Jukka K. Korpela. Kind of along the lines of what I said earlier, it seems the browsers are just inconsistent when rendering the same rules. – Miles Grimes Jan 8 '13 at 22:11
  • It's not a duplicate. The problem on that question was to do with margins and paddings. There are no margins and paddings here, and yes, I did try it just in case. – Vincent McNabb Jan 8 '13 at 22:18

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