77

Example:

<div someAttr="parentDiv. We need to get it from child.">
    <table>
        ...
        <td> <div id="myDiv"></div> </td>
        ...
    </table>
</div>

I want to get the parent by some selector from the inner div element (the one with the myDiv class).

How do I achieve that with plain JavaScript, without jQuery?

Something like:

var div = document.getElementById('myDiv');
div.someParentFindMethod('some selector');
4
44

Here's the most basic version:

function collectionHas(a, b) { //helper function (see below)
    for(var i = 0, len = a.length; i < len; i ++) {
        if(a[i] == b) return true;
    }
    return false;
}
function findParentBySelector(elm, selector) {
    var all = document.querySelectorAll(selector);
    var cur = elm.parentNode;
    while(cur && !collectionHas(all, cur)) { //keep going up until you find a match
        cur = cur.parentNode; //go up
    }
    return cur; //will return null if not found
}

var yourElm = document.getElementById("yourElm"); //div in your original code
var selector = ".yes";
var parent = findParentBySelector(yourElm, selector);
3
  • 17
    This is rather inefficient in that it retrieves all elements with that selector in the entire document, rather than just checking the parent. – user663031 Oct 5 '16 at 12:58
  • 2
    This JSPerf test analyzes Element.matches(), Element.closest(), and one polyfill for each of those methods. The polyfill for Element.matches() looks very similar to your implementation. To address the performance concern of @user663031, perhaps you could use Element.matches() instead of Document.querySelectorAll(). It appears to run faster than the related polyfill. – Ryan V Mar 3 '20 at 18:16
  • Agree with user663031 – Don Nisnoni Apr 12 '20 at 20:02
230

You may use closest() in modern browsers:

var div = document.querySelector('div#myDiv');
div.closest('div[someAtrr]');

Use object detection to supply a polyfill or alternative method for backwards compatability with IE.

3
43

Finds the closest parent (or the element itself) that matches the given selector. Also included is a selector to stop searching, in case you know a common ancestor that you should stop searching at.

function closest(el, selector, stopSelector) {
  var retval = null;
  while (el) {
    if (el.matches(selector)) {
      retval = el;
      break
    } else if (stopSelector && el.matches(stopSelector)) {
      break
    }
    el = el.parentElement;
  }
  return retval;
}
1
  • I owe you a beer! Thx! – DurkoMatko Oct 23 '19 at 15:42
3

Using leech's answer with indexOf (to support IE)

This is using what leech talked about, but making it work for IE (IE doesn't support matches):

function closest(el, selector, stopSelector) {
  var retval = null;
  while (el) {
    if (el.className.indexOf(selector) > -1) {
      retval = el;
      break
    } else if (stopSelector && el.className.indexOf(stopSelector) > -1) {
      break
    }
    el = el.parentElement;
  }
  return retval;
}

It's not perfect, but it works if the selector is unique enough so it won't accidentally match the incorrect element.

2

Here's a recursive solution:

function closest(el, selector, stopSelector) {
  if(!el || !el.parentElement) return null
  else if(stopSelector && el.parentElement.matches(stopSelector)) return null
  else if(el.parentElement.matches(selector)) return el.parentElement
  else return closest(el.parentElement, selector, stopSelector)
}
1

I thought I would provide a much more robust example, also in typescript, but it would be easy to convert to pure javascript. This function will query parents using either the ID like so "#my-element" or the class ".my-class" and unlike some of these answers will handle multiple classes. I found I named some similarly and so the examples above were finding the wrong things.

function queryParentElement(el:HTMLElement | null, selector:string) {
    let isIDSelector = selector.indexOf("#") === 0
    if (selector.indexOf('.') === 0 || selector.indexOf('#') === 0) {
        selector = selector.slice(1)
    }
    while (el) {
        if (isIDSelector) {
            if (el.id === selector) {
                return el
            }
        }
        else if (el.classList.contains(selector)) {
            return el;
        }
        el = el.parentElement;
    }
    return null;
}

To select by class name:

let elementByClassName = queryParentElement(someElement,".my-class")

To select by ID:

let elementByID = queryParentElement(someElement,"#my-element")

0
0

simple example of a function parent_by_selector which return a parent or null (no selector matches):

function parent_by_selector(node, selector, stop_selector = 'body') {
  var parent = node.parentNode;
  while (true) {
    if (parent.matches(stop_selector)) break;
    if (parent.matches(selector)) break;
    parent = parent.parentNode; // get upper parent and check again
  }
  if (parent.matches(stop_selector)) parent = null; // when parent is a tag 'body' -> parent not found
  return parent;
};
-2
var base_element = document.getElementById('__EXAMPLE_ELEMENT__');
for( var found_parent=base_element, i=100; found_parent.parentNode && !(found_parent=found_parent.parentNode).classList.contains('__CLASS_NAME__') && i>0; i-- );
console.log( found_parent );
-4

Here is simple way to access parent id

document.getElementById("child1").parentNode;

will do the magic for you to access the parent div.

<html>
<head>
</head>
<body id="body">
<script>
function alertAncestorsUntilID() {
var a = document.getElementById("child").parentNode;
alert(a.id);
}
</script>
<div id="master">
Master
<div id="child">Child</div>
</div>
<script>
alertAncestorsUntilID();
</script>
</body>
</html>
3
  • 2
    He wants the parent with some class, not just the parent. – user663031 Oct 5 '16 at 12:59
  • @torazaburo This is Question from OP "JavaScript: How to get parent element by selector?" it does not mention Class – ameya rote Oct 18 '16 at 7:00
  • 2
    Selector could also be a class or attribute and so on – Sedat Kilinc Jun 22 '17 at 14:20

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