3

I want to write a small piece of test code to remind me that certain collections are equivalent i.e. simple, self-contained, easy to read and LINQ Lambda oriented (to fulfill a personal learning target).

Here's what I have come up with:

var e = new IEnumerable<int> [] {
                                    Enumerable.Range(100, 4).ToArray(), 
                                    new int[] { 100, 101, 102, 103 },
                                    new [] { 100, 101, 102, 103 },
                                    Enumerable.Range(100, 4).ToList(), 
                                    new List<int> { 100, 101, 102, 103 }
                                };

var permutations = e.SelectMany(s => e, ( lhs, rhs ) => new { lhs,  rhs })
                    .Where( x => !x.lhs.Equals ( x.rhs ) ); 

foreach (var item in permutations)
{
    Assert.That( item.lhs, Is.EqualTo( item.rhs ) );
}
  • Q1. Is there a 'simple' alteration to yield 10 combinations of pairs (I currently have 20 permutations of pairs)? By 'simple' I mean using existing LINQ operators, rather than, say writing a recursive extension method.

  • Q2. Is there a better way of asserting "all members of the array are equivalent" in context?


As regards Q1, this would seem to give me the right-hand side (rhs) but how to I 'carry-through' (or rejoin to) the 'original' to give me the left-hand side (lhs)?:

var r = e.SelectMany(( e1, i ) => e.Skip( i + 1 ));
3
  • 1
    It's not clear what you're trying to achieve: do you simply want to assert that (100,101,102,103) contains same elements of e.g. (103,102,100,101) ? – Teejay Jan 9 '13 at 14:46
  • 2
    Does order matter? How should duplicates be considered? – yoozer8 Jan 9 '13 at 14:55
  • Also, yours is not an array, but basically a matrix – Teejay Jan 9 '13 at 15:02
4

This will work

var leftHandSide = inputSequence.First();
var rightHandSideList = inputSequence.Skip(1);

rightHandSideList.All(s => s.SequenceEqual(leftHandSide));

Basically we take 1st element, and compare remaining with this. Here I'm assuming order matters. Also assuming list has at least 2 elements.

2
  • 1
    +1 var res = rightHandSideList.All(s => s.OrderBy(_ => _).SequenceEqual(leftHandSide.OrderBy(_ => _))); To ignore in-list orders. – Adam Houldsworth Jan 9 '13 at 15:02
  • My thinking was wonky: I only need to compare the first element with every subsequent element! So I don't need permutation or combinations in this scenario but I would like to know how to do it with my current approach so I'll ask another question. Thanks! – petemoloy Jan 10 '13 at 11:20

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.