It is possible to "peel" function argument type using:

void foo_double(double a)
{
}

void foo_int(int a)
{

}

template <class R, class A0>
void bar(R (*fp)(A0))
{   
    // Do something related with A0
}

int main()
{
    bar(foo_double); // A0 is double
    bar(foo_int);    // A0 is int
}    

Is it possible to do the same "argument type peeling" to a class constructor function?

Edit:

I believe I didn't explain myself clearly in the original code snippet. Here is the complete scenario.

I have multiple classes C1,...,Cn which I need to expose to python as functions. Lets assume all classes have a common void Run() method. However, the constructors of these classes accept different arguments. To expose functions to python I use boost.python which automatically exports function to an appropriate python function while handling all type conversions (mostly primitives).

My first solution was:

class C1 
{
public:
    C1() {}
    void Run();
};

class C2
{
public:
    C2(double a) {}
    void Run();
};

template <class T>
void python_wrapper()
{
    T instance();
    instance.Run();
}

template <class T, class A0>
void python_wrapper(A0 a0)
{
    T instance(a0);
    instance.Run();
}

BOOST_PYTHON_MODULE(_pythonmodule)
{
    // This is boost.python stuff
    python::def("f1", python_wrapper<C1>);
    python::def("f2", python_wrapper<C2, double>);
}

And... It works.

What I am trying to accomplish now is to use python_wrapper<C2> instead of python_wrapper<C2, double> while inferring the constructor argument types.

As I showed in the original post. I could accomplish something similar if I was wrapping functions instead of classes.

  • 2
    No. Why would you want that? Knowing function argument types is mostly harmless, uh, I mean, mostly useless. 99% of the time you want to know if a function is callable in a certain way, not if the arguments have a specific type. – R. Martinho Fernandes Jan 9 '13 at 15:06
  • Constructors don't have names and can't be called like ordinary member functions. I think std::is_constructible may be a useful trait for whatever problem you're trying to solve. – Kerrek SB Jan 9 '13 at 15:12
  • @R.MartinhoFernandes, I want to generate a function bar (to be exported to python) that creates an instance of a class by calling the constructor. Without explicitly specifying the c'tor arguments. There is a closed set of classes I would use. I don't wan't to modify any of them for that purpose. – Xyand Jan 9 '13 at 15:13
  • @KerrekSB, Thanks. I thought about using it but couldn't come up with a solution. – Xyand Jan 9 '13 at 15:14
  • How would this bar function be called from python? bar(MyClass,arg1,arg2)? – Vaughn Cato Jan 9 '13 at 15:24
up vote 9 down vote accepted
+50

There is no way of deducing a type's constructor's arguments.

C++98/03 and C++11 specifications explicitly list the context in which type deduction may occur (refer to § 14.8.2 and its subsections). Deduction is a qualify of life enhancement for template programming, and not mandatory. Anything that can be done through deduction can also be achieved through explicit calls. Thus, in order for deduction to be possible, it would require that one could explicitly provide a constructor to a function template.

However, this is impossible. As noted in § 12.1 of C++98/03 and C++11 specifications, constructors do not have names. Additionally, § 12.1.12 of C++98/03 and § 12.1.10 of C++11 state that the address of a constructor shall not be taken. Thus, there is no way to provide an identifier; therefore, deduction cannot occur.


With deduction being impossible, it may be worth considering alternative solutions. Each solution will have its own sets of pros and cons, but all of them will require that the argument types be explicitly listed in some context outside of the constructor:

  • Provide the constructor's argument types to a function template.
    • Pros:
      • Fairly simple.
    • Cons:
      • The association between the type and the type's constructor's argument types is not very visible.
      • The association is not reusable. For example, the association would need to be duplicated if passing it to multiple function templates or class templates.
      • Required for every type that has a constructor with an arity of 1 or greater.
  • Maintain the association with a type trait.
    • Pros:
      • Reusable.
      • The association between the type and the type's constructor's argument types is more visible.
      • Not overly complicated.
    • Cons:
      • Coding is slightly more complex than providing the association directly to a function template.
      • Required for every type that has a constructor with an arity of 1 or greater.
  • Create a factory function for each type.
    • Pros:
      • Very simple.
      • Reusable.
      • The association between the type and the type's constructor's argument types is very visible.
    • Cons:
      • Required for every type, even if the arity is 0. This could be mitigated with an invasive factory functions, as there will be no ambiguities due to scope. For a non-invasive factory functions, there may be collisions on signatures, so the function names must be unique.
  • Heavy use of meta-programming to have a vector of constructor argument types. Template code would then iterate over the growing list trying to identify a workable match.
    • Pros:
      • If types have similar constructors, then a single entry in the vector may serve as a workable match for multiple types.
    • Cons:
      • Much more complex.
      • May require modifying compiler arguments to support template depth.

Given the situation described for your environment:

  • There are many classes.
  • Some already exists and shouldn't be changed.
  • More of these are written on a daily basis.
  • The constructors are unique.

When factored with the C++ specification, I believe we have defined a Kobayashi Maru. You will have to weight out the pros and cons to determine what approach can be adapted for your environment. The simplest approach may already be the one you have in place, as it only requires a single location for code to change as more types are created.


Nevertheless, here is an approach using a type trait that provides information about a type's constructor in a noninvasive manner. Without C++11 capabilities, such as variadic templates, there is a bit of boilerplate code. Additionally, the implementation may not cover all cases, such as multiple constructors.

Using the classes presented in the original question:

class C1 
{
public:
  C1();
  void Run();
};

class C2
{
public:
  C2(double a);
  void Run();
};

A template that represents constructor's traits will be used. I am using a type-list provided by Boost.MPL to represent a constructor's argument types. The default constructor_traits indicates no arguments are required.

/// @brief constructor_traits is a type_trait that is used to noninvasively
///        associated T with constructor meta information, such as T'
///        constructor's argument types.
///
///        For example, if Foo has a constructor that accepts a single
///        integer, then constructor_traits<Foo>::type should be
///        boost::mpl::vector<int>.
template <typename T>
struct constructor_traits
{
  typedef boost::mpl::vector<> type;
};

This trait is then specialized for types with constructors that accept arguments, such as C2.

/// Specialize constructor_traits for C2 to indicate that its constructor
/// accepts a double.
template <>
struct constructor_traits<C2>
{
  typedef boost::mpl::vector<double> type;
};

The boost::mpl::vector is a list of types that represents the constructor's arguments. It provides random access via boost::mpl::at. To provide a slightly cleaner access to elements, a helper type is introduced:

/// @brief Helper type that makes getting the constructor argument slightly
///        easier.
template <typename Vector,
          std::size_t Index>
struct get_constructor_arg
  : boost::mpl::at<Vector, boost::mpl::int_<Index> >
{};

When exposing the functions to Boost.Python, the desired syntax is to only provide a single type. Either function templates or class templates can be used to solve this problem. I have decided to use class templates, as it reduces some of the boilerplate code.

/// @brief runner type is used to provide a static run function that
///        will delegate the construction and running of type T based
///        on T's constructor_traits.
template <typename T,
          typename Args = typename constructor_traits<T>::type,
          std::size_t = boost::mpl::size<Args>::value>
struct runner
{
  static void run()
  {
    T().Run();
  }
};

This template is then specialized for the amount of arguments the constructor accepts. The following is specialized to accept one argument. This is determined by the 1 in the template argument list of the specialization.

/// Specialization for runner for types with have a single argument
/// constructor.
template <typename T,
          typename Args>
struct runner<T, Args, 1>
{
  static void run(typename get_constructor_arg<Args, 0>::type a0)
  {
    T(a0).Run();
  }
};

Function templates could also be used to solve this problem. I decided to use class templates because:

  • No need for SFINAE. Would need to use enable_if constructs to select the correct template.
  • Being able to provide default template arguments with a class template prevents the need to obtain the constructor_trait multiple times.

The resulting Boost.Python calls would look like:

BOOST_PYTHON_MODULE(_pythonmodule)
{
  boost::python::def("f1", &runner<C1>::run);
  boost::python::def("f2", &runner<C2>::run);
}

Here is the complete code:

#include <iostream>
#include <boost/mpl/vector.hpp>
#include <boost/python.hpp>

class C1 
{
public:
  C1() {}
  void Run() { std::cout << "run c1" << std::endl; }
};

class C2
{
public:
  C2(double a) : a_(a) {}
  void Run() { std::cout << "run c2: " << a_ << std::endl;}
private:
  double a_;
};

/// @brief constructor_traits is a type_trait that is used to noninvasively
///        associated T with constructor meta information, such as T'
///        constructor's argument types.
///
///        For example, if Foo has a constructor that accepts a single
///        integer, then constructor_traits<Foo>::type should be
///        boost::mpl::vector<int>.
template <typename T>
struct constructor_traits
{
  typedef boost::mpl::vector<> type;
};

/// Specialize constructor_traits for C2 to indicate that its constructor
/// accepts a double.
template <>
struct constructor_traits<C2>
{
  typedef boost::mpl::vector<double> type;
};

/// @brief Helper type that makes getting the constructor argument slightly
///        easier.
template <typename Vector,
          std::size_t Index>
struct get_constructor_arg
  : boost::mpl::at<Vector, boost::mpl::int_<Index> >
{};

/// @brief runner type is used to provide a static run function that
///        will delegate the construction and running of type T based
///        on T's constructor_traits.
template <typename T,
          typename Args = typename constructor_traits<T>::type,
          std::size_t = boost::mpl::size<Args>::value>
struct runner
{
  static void run()
  {
    T().Run();
  }
};

/// Specialization for runner for types with have a single argument
/// constructor.
template <typename T,
          typename Args>
struct runner<T, Args, 1>
{
  static void run(typename get_constructor_arg<Args, 0>::type a0)
  {
    T(a0).Run();
  }
};

BOOST_PYTHON_MODULE(example)
{
  boost::python::def("f1", &runner<C1>::run);
  boost::python::def("f2", &runner<C2>::run);
}

And the test output:

>>> import example
>>> example.f1()
run c1
>>> example.f2(3.14)
run c2: 3.14
  • Thanks. But then I have to specialize constructor_traits for every class I want to wrap (I have many). How is it different than my solution? You still have to specify c'tor argument types, only elsewhere. – Xyand Jan 11 '13 at 7:42
  • @Albert: It decouples the information from its usage, and the type-to-constructor association may be slightly more visible than <C2, double>. As a few posters have stated, there is likely not a technique that will allow you exact deduction as the address and type of a constructor is not available. Do your many classes have similar constructors? Would maintaining a list of constructor type information, and having the templates iterate over trying each one be a workable solution? Or are most of the constructors unique? – Tanner Sansbury Jan 11 '13 at 14:01
  • At the moment they are unique. But more of these are written on a daily basis (even temporary/test classes). I have little control of those c'tors. As I suspected the answer is "No, you can't". This surprises me as it can be easily done for functions. I learned from your answer but at the moment I think I'll stick to my solution. It would be more straight forward for the users. – Xyand Jan 11 '13 at 14:54
  • Hello. Could you point to some article about "Heavy use of meta-programming to have a vector of constructor argument types"? I'm currently trying to implement this functionality. I'm trying to get compile-time tuple for a given typename Constructible – Sergey.quixoticaxis.Ivanov Oct 3 at 13:19

You cannot take the address of a constructor (C++98 Standard 12.1/12 Constructors - "12.1-12 Constructors - "The address of a constructor shall not be taken.")

If all classes share a base class then you could make a factory, but without C++11 variadic templates I don't know of a way to do the argument forwarding.

template <typename type>
static type*  construct(){
    return new type();
}


auto value = &construct<int>;

You now have a bindable function that when called, produces an type*

auto value = &construct<int>;
int* newInt = (*value)();
delete newInt;

To allow for varying constructors inputs, this uses C++11

template <typename type>
class constructor {

public:
    template<typename ...Args>
    static std::shared_ptr<type>  alloc(Args&& ...args){
        return std::shared_ptr<type>(new type(std::forward<Args>(args)...));
    }
    // placement new
    template<typename ...Args>
    static std::shared_ptr<type>  realloc( std::shared_ptr<type>& object,Args&& ...args){
        (new (&(*object)) type(std::forward<Args>(args)...));
        return object;
     }
};

class fooBar{
public:
    fooBar(int x,float f){
    }
};
typedef std::shared_ptr<fooBar> fooBarPtr;

Usage:

fooBarPtr a = constructor<fooBar>::alloc(5,0.0f);

Or this might be closer to what the op wants.

class fooy{
    int _x = 0;
public:
    fooy(int argCount, va_list& list){
        if( argCount > 0){
            _x = va_arg(list, int);
        }
    }
};

template <typename type>
std::shared_ptr<type> alloc(int argCount,...) {
    va_list list;
    va_start(list, argCount);
    auto result = std::shared_ptr<type>( new type(argCount,list) );
    va_end(list);
    return result;
}

Usage:

auto foo1 = alloc<fooy>(0); // passing zero args
auto foo2 = alloc<fooy>(1,1234); // passing one arg
  • 1
    Not at all bad, but it doesn't explain anything... How is this supposed to work? – K-ballo Jan 9 '13 at 15:20
  • Does this not provide enough information to answer: "Is it possible to do the same "argument type peeling" to a class constructor function?" What else should I expand on? – Nico Jan 9 '13 at 15:39
  • I'll happily +1 your answer if you expand it to allow for emplacement via placement new, rather than dynamic allocation! – Agentlien Jan 9 '13 at 15:40
  • @Nice: It didn't when I posted that comment, it was just the first bunch of code and nothing else – K-ballo Jan 9 '13 at 15:42
  • @Agentlien I think that's what you wanted. I don't have time to go test it~! – Nico Jan 9 '13 at 15:49

Since you don't want to change the existing classes, there's no way to automate the deduction for those classes within C++. You can do it outside C++ for those classes by extracting the signature information from the source code. This extraction can be done manually or automated by a script or even by a C++ program.

For each existing class E, use the extracted information to define a specialization of a class template that defines a static member function func that passes its argument(s), if any, to constructor of class E and invokes the Run method.

For new classes, simply require them to define func, and let the class template default to using the existing func.

Then the general Python wrapper definition code can infer arguments for func, which you have shown you know how to do.

This means the folks who define the classes just need to start adding func for new such classes.


At a slightly higher level, I think it would be worth using some time on involving the relevant people and finding out how an ungood design could be adopted and entrenched by having a zillion classes defined. With the goal of preventing that from happening again in the future. How to deal with that would depend, I think, on how it happened.

I'm not sure how this will interact with python::def, but in general this is what variadic templates are for:

struct C1{
  C1(){}
  void run(){}
};

struct C2{
  C2(int){}
  void run(){}
};

template<typename CLASS, typename... PARAMS>
void call(PARAMS... params) {
  CLASS inst(params...);
  inst.run();
}

main() {
  call<C1>();
  call<C2>(42);
}

It's c++11, but supported in gcc since version 4.3

  • Thanks. Two problems. I use VS2012. I need to expose the function interface to python - not to call it. – Xyand Jan 14 '13 at 21:17
  • I haven't used VS2012, but I've read that it has variadoc template support if you tweak a setting. I don't know what python::def actually is. You might need to explicitly specialize call there (but at least you don't need to write call multiple times) – dspeyer Jan 15 '13 at 4:23
  • @dspeyer: I believe Albert wants a solution that does not require the constructor's argument's types to be explicitly provided other than in the constructor itself. For example, &call<C1> has a type of void(*)() and &call<C2> has a type of void(*)(int), with the call function template deducing the argument types based only on the provided class during instantiation, not invocation. – Tanner Sansbury Jan 15 '13 at 17:55

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