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I want to have a customer testimonial quote centered in the middle of a page. The quote might be arbitrary length, but doesn't span two lines. Then I want a new line and then the name of the person that provided the testimonial, just under the testimonial but right justified.

<div class="quote">
 "Wow!  Thanks, create customer service."
</div>
<div class="source">
  -- John S. - California
</div> 

Styles:

.quote {text-align:center}
.source {text-align:right; padding-right:300px;}

How do I align the source so that I works for arbitrary length of quotes?

1
  • That looks like blockquote content that's been marked up with a div. Also, the cite tag exists. – cimmanon Jan 9 '13 at 19:51
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This will do, probably:

HTML:

<blockquote>
    <p>
        <span class="quote">
            "Wow!  Thanks, create customer service."
            <cite>
                 -- John S. - California
            </cite>
        </span> 
    </p>
</blockquote>

CSS:

blockquote {
    text-align: center;
}
.quote {
    position: relative;
}
cite {
     position: absolute;
     right: 0;
     bottom: -25px;
     text-align: right;
}
1
  • This works. I didn't know you could use position:relative in a span element, which is inline. This makes sense. Although, the <p> tag isn't needed is it? – Homan Jan 9 '13 at 20:48
1

Change your markup a bit and nest the source into the quote.

<div class="quote">
    "Wow!  Thanks, create customer service."
    <div class="source">
         -- John S. - California
    </div> 
</div>

The CSS for it:

.quote { 
  display:table;
  text-align: center;
  margin:0 auto;
}

.quote .source {
  text-align:right;
}

Here is the fiddle for it.

3
  • This is pretty clever. Definitely better than either two answers (including mine!). Big +1. – Chris Jan 9 '13 at 20:12
  • This answer works on modern browsers, but I neglected to say I had to support IE7 still (which display:table is not performing correctly). THiCE answer works on ie7, though has padding issues I need to work on. – Homan Jan 9 '13 at 20:46
  • @sketchfemme in cases like this I would always prefer a conditional stylesheet for ie7, so a mix of both solutions would do it for me. Anyway the HTML of THiCE is definitely the best. – axel.michel Jan 10 '13 at 5:40
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Basically: you can't without going too ugly and hack-y with your markup. (See THiCE's answer for such a solution).

I do not recommend this, but if you're okay with using JavaScript, then this is fairly simple: (below uses jQuery, but can be achieved without it)

$(".quote").each(function() {
    var $this = $(this);
    $this.next().css({"padding-right": ($this.parent().width() - $this.width()) / 2});
});

If you don't want to use JavaScript and don't want to go hack-y, I suggest you rethink your layout just a bit.

4
  • That's not ugly! I've improved my answer :) If you'd like to go hacky or ugly, use javascript for layout purposes.... – Thijs Kramer Jan 9 '13 at 20:00
  • @THiCE Your improved answer is nice :) It still is hacky though; absolute positioning is generally.. um, well it just feels wrong. I do NOT recommend using JavaScript for layout; I was just presenting another method if the OP insists on the layout in mind. – Chris Jan 9 '13 at 20:04
  • 1
    I think absolute positioning is a way to keep full control of the position of elements without misusing them. I'm not a big fan of display: table-cell to achieve certain layout wishes, you are not a big fan of absolute positioning :) – Thijs Kramer Jan 9 '13 at 20:11
  • @THiCE Yep. :) Although I have to say the third answer looks promising -- beware, uses display: table;! Although I think the same could be achieved using display: inline-block; (with a tiny modification). – Chris Jan 9 '13 at 20:14

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