1

I have the following code that iterates along the diagonals that are orthogonal to the diagonals normally returned by np.diagonal. It starts at position (0, 0) and works its way towards the lower right coordinate.

The code works as intended but is not very numpy with all its loops and inefficient in having to create many arrays to do the trick.

So I wonder if there is a nicer way to do this, because I don't see how I would stride my array or use the diagonal-methods of numpy to do it in a nicer way (though I expect there are some tricks I fail to see).

import numpy as np

A = np.zeros((4,5))

#Construct a distance array of same size that uses (0, 0) as origo
#and evaluates distances along first and second dimensions slightly
#differently so that no values in the array is the same
D = np.zeros(A.shape)
for i in range(D.shape[0]):
    for j in range(D.shape[1]):
        D[i, j] = i * (1 + 1.0 / (grid_shape[0] + 1)) + j

print D
#[[ 0.          1.          2.          3.          4.        ]
# [ 1.05882353  2.05882353  3.05882353  4.05882353  5.05882353]
# [ 2.11764706  3.11764706  4.11764706  5.11764706  6.11764706]
# [ 3.17647059  4.17647059  5.17647059  6.17647059  7.17647059]]

#Make a flat sorted copy
rD = D.ravel().copy()
rD.sort()

#Just to show how it works, assigning incrementing values
#iterating along the 'orthagonal' diagonals starting at (0, 0) position
for i, v in enumerate(rD):

    A[D == v] = i

print A
#[[ 0  1  3  6 10]
# [ 2  4  7 11 14]
# [ 5  8 12 15 17]
# [ 9 13 16 18 19]]

Edit

To clarify, I want to iterate element-wise through the entire A but doing so in the order the code above invokes (which is displayed in the final print).

It is not important which direction the iteration goes along the diagonals (if 1 and 2 switched placed, and 3 and 5 etc. in A) only that the diagonals are orthogonal to the main diagonal of A (the one produced by np.diag(A)).

The application/reason for this question is in my previous question (in the solution part at the bottom of that question): Constructing a 2D grid from potentially incomplete list of candidates

4

Here is a way that avoids Python for-loops.

First, let's look at our addition tables:

import numpy as np
grid_shape = (4,5)
N = np.prod(grid_shape)

y = np.add.outer(np.arange(grid_shape[0]),np.arange(grid_shape[1]))
print(y)

# [[0 1 2 3 4]
#  [1 2 3 4 5]
#  [2 3 4 5 6]
#  [3 4 5 6 7]]

The key idea is that if we visit the sums in the addition table in order, we would be iterating through the array in the desired order.

We can find out the indices associated with that order using np.argsort:

idx = np.argsort(y.ravel())
print(idx)
# [ 0  1  5  2  6 10  3  7 11 15  4  8 12 16  9 13 17 14 18 19]

idx is golden. It is essentially everything you need to iterate through any 2D array of shape (4,5), since a 2D array is just a 1D array reshaped.

If your ultimate goal is to generate the array A that you show above at the end of your post, then you could use argsort again:

print(np.argsort(idx).reshape(grid_shape[0],-1))
# [[ 0  1  3  6 10]
#  [ 2  4  7 11 14]
#  [ 5  8 12 15 17]
#  [ 9 13 16 18 19]]

Or, alternatively, if you need to assign other values to A, perhaps this would be more useful:

A = np.zeros(grid_shape)
A1d = A.ravel()
A1d[idx] = np.arange(N)  # you can change np.arange(N) to any 1D array of shape (N,)
print(A)
# [[  0.   1.   3.   6.  10.]
#  [  2.   4.   7.  11.  15.]
#  [  5.   8.  12.  16.  18.]
#  [  9.  13.  14.  17.  19.]]

I know you asked for a way to iterate through your array, but I wanted to show the above because generating arrays through whole-array assignment or numpy function calls (like np.argsort) as done above will probably be faster than using a Python loop. But if you need to use a Python loop, then:

for i, j in enumerate(idx):
   A1d[j] = i

print(A)
# [[  0.   1.   3.   6.  10.]
#  [  2.   4.   7.  11.  15.]
#  [  5.   8.  12.  16.  18.]
#  [  9.  13.  14.  17.  19.]]
3
  • Thanks, and you're right, I rather not iterate, but I used the word for want of better ways to explain what I wanted which was more or less to get to the A1d[idx] part of your second last code-block. – deinonychusaur Jan 10 '13 at 14:11
  • 1
    Nice, great point about just using fancy indexing. Side note: argsort does not use stable sorting, so for larger arrays you might get switching in the diagonal order. (I bet you can find it without argsort too, but thats likely just tedious, so just use mergesort). – seberg Jan 10 '13 at 14:18
  • Now I've linked to the question with the real application of the 'iteration' if you're interested. – deinonychusaur Jan 10 '13 at 14:30
3
>>> D
array([[ 0,  1,  2,  3,  4],
       [ 5,  6,  7,  8,  9],
       [10, 11, 12, 13, 14],
       [15, 16, 17, 18, 19]]) 

>>> D[::-1].diagonal(offset=1)
array([16, 12,  8,  4])
>>> D[::-1].diagonal(offset=-3)
array([0])
>>> np.hstack([D[::-1].diagonal(offset=-x) for x in np.arange(-4,4)])[::-1]
array([ 0,  1,  5,  2,  6, 10,  3,  7, 11, 15,  4,  8, 12, 16,  9, 13, 17,
       14, 18, 19])

Simpler as long as it is not a large matrix.

1

I'm not sure if this is what you really want, but maybe:

>>> import numpy as np
>>> ar = np.random.random((4,4))
>>> ar
array([[ 0.04844116,  0.10543146,  0.30506354,  0.4813217 ],
       [ 0.59962641,  0.44428831,  0.16629692,  0.65330539],
       [ 0.61854927,  0.6385717 ,  0.71615447,  0.13172049],
       [ 0.05001291,  0.41577457,  0.5579213 ,  0.7791656 ]])
>>> ar.diagonal()
array([ 0.04844116,  0.44428831,  0.71615447,  0.7791656 ])
>>> ar[::-1].diagonal()
array([ 0.05001291,  0.6385717 ,  0.16629692,  0.4813217 ])

Edit As a general solution, for arbitrarily shape arrays, you can use

import numpy as np
shape = tuple([np.random.randint(3,10) for i in range(2)])
ar = np.arange(np.prod(shape)).reshape(shape)
out = np.hstack([ar[::-1].diagonal(offset=x) \
                for x in np.arange(-ar.shape[0]+1,ar.shape[1]-1)])
print ar
print out

giving, for example

[[ 0  1  2  3  4]
 [ 5  6  7  8  9]
 [10 11 12 13 14]
 [15 16 17 18 19]
 [20 21 22 23 24]]
[ 0  5  1 10  6  2 15 11  7  3 20 16 12  8  4 21 17 13  9 22 18 14 23 19]
6
  • It could be a step on the way, but I want to iterate through the entire ar, elementwise, using diagonals like the last one – deinonychusaur Jan 10 '13 at 12:57
  • Oh, you mean, first diagonal as [0.048...], second as [0.599..,0.105] and so on? – Thorsten Kranz Jan 10 '13 at 12:59
  • yes, and as elements so the full thing becomes[0.048, 0.599, 0.105, ... 0.779] – deinonychusaur Jan 10 '13 at 13:00
  • I added a clarification in my question that should show better what I want – deinonychusaur Jan 10 '13 at 13:15
  • 1
    @deinonychusaur note that diagonal accepts an offset argument to pick a different diagonal. – seberg Jan 10 '13 at 13:39

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