504

I am parsing a string in C++ using the following:

using namespace std;

string parsed,input="text to be parsed";
stringstream input_stringstream(input);

if (getline(input_stringstream,parsed,' '))
{
     // do some processing.
}

Parsing with a single char delimiter is fine. But what if I want to use a string as delimiter.

Example: I want to split:

scott>=tiger

with >= as delimiter so that I can get scott and tiger.

2

29 Answers 29

785

You can use the std::string::find() function to find the position of your string delimiter, then use std::string::substr() to get a token.

Example:

std::string s = "scott>=tiger";
std::string delimiter = ">=";
std::string token = s.substr(0, s.find(delimiter)); // token is "scott"
  • The find(const string& str, size_t pos = 0) function returns the position of the first occurrence of str in the string, or npos if the string is not found.

  • The substr(size_t pos = 0, size_t n = npos) function returns a substring of the object, starting at position pos and of length npos.


If you have multiple delimiters, after you have extracted one token, you can remove it (delimiter included) to proceed with subsequent extractions (if you want to preserve the original string, just use s = s.substr(pos + delimiter.length());):

s.erase(0, s.find(delimiter) + delimiter.length());

This way you can easily loop to get each token.

Complete Example

std::string s = "scott>=tiger>=mushroom";
std::string delimiter = ">=";

size_t pos = 0;
std::string token;
while ((pos = s.find(delimiter)) != std::string::npos) {
    token = s.substr(0, pos);
    std::cout << token << std::endl;
    s.erase(0, pos + delimiter.length());
}
std::cout << s << std::endl;

Output:

scott
tiger
mushroom
9
  • 108
    For those who don't want to modify the input string, do size_t last = 0; size_t next = 0; while ((next = s.find(delimiter, last)) != string::npos) { cout << s.substr(last, next-last) << endl; last = next + 1; } cout << s.substr(last) << endl;
    – hayk.mart
    Jan 31 '15 at 5:07
  • 44
    NOTE: mushroom outputs outside of the loop, i.e. s = mushroom
    – Don Larynx
    Jan 31 '15 at 22:22
  • 2
    Those samples does not extract the last token from string. A sample of mine extracting an IpV4 from one string: <code>size_t last = 0; size_t next = 0; int index = 0; while (index<4) { next = str.find(delimiter, last); auto number = str.substr(last, next - last); IPv4[index++] = atoi(number.c_str()); last = next + 1; }</code>
    – rfog
    Aug 17 '15 at 8:00
  • 3
    @hayk.mart Just a note, that would be the following, you need add 2 not 1 due to the size of the delimiter which is 2 characters :) : std::string s = "scott>=tiger>=mushroom"; std::string delimiter = ">="; size_t last = 0; size_t next = 0; while ((next = s.find(delimiter, last)) != std::string::npos) { std::cout << s.substr(last, next-last) << std::endl; last = next + 2; } std::cout << s.substr(last) << std::endl; Oct 30 '15 at 12:52
  • 10
    Wondering how many of the 615 upvoters missed the last line and are running hidden bugs in their production code. Judging from the comments, I'd wager at least a handful. IMO this answer would be much better suited if it didn't use cout and instead showed it as a function. Sep 9 '20 at 8:47
100

This method uses std::string::find without mutating the original string by remembering the beginning and end of the previous substring token.

#include <iostream>
#include <string>

int main()
{
    std::string s = "scott>=tiger";
    std::string delim = ">=";

    auto start = 0U;
    auto end = s.find(delim);
    while (end != std::string::npos)
    {
        std::cout << s.substr(start, end - start) << std::endl;
        start = end + delim.length();
        end = s.find(delim, start);
    }

    std::cout << s.substr(start, end);
}
3
  • How do I perform this operation on vector<string> where both strings in the vector are of same form and have same delimiters. I just want to output both strings parsed out in the same way as this works for one string. My "string delim" will remain same ofcourse Mar 16 at 21:48
  • Shouldn't the last line rather be s.substr(start, end - start) ? I guess this only works as start + end > size() and as such it always takes the rest of the string ... Sep 12 at 11:10
  • Since end == std::string::npos, it means we want to return the final token.
    – moswald
    Sep 12 at 15:34
69

For string delimiter

Split string based on a string delimiter. Such as splitting string "adsf-+qwret-+nvfkbdsj-+orthdfjgh-+dfjrleih" based on string delimiter "-+", output will be {"adsf", "qwret", "nvfkbdsj", "orthdfjgh", "dfjrleih"}

#include <iostream>
#include <sstream>
#include <vector>

using namespace std;

// for string delimiter
vector<string> split (string s, string delimiter) {
    size_t pos_start = 0, pos_end, delim_len = delimiter.length();
    string token;
    vector<string> res;

    while ((pos_end = s.find (delimiter, pos_start)) != string::npos) {
        token = s.substr (pos_start, pos_end - pos_start);
        pos_start = pos_end + delim_len;
        res.push_back (token);
    }

    res.push_back (s.substr (pos_start));
    return res;
}

int main() {
    string str = "adsf-+qwret-+nvfkbdsj-+orthdfjgh-+dfjrleih";
    string delimiter = "-+";
    vector<string> v = split (str, delimiter);

    for (auto i : v) cout << i << endl;

    return 0;
}


Output

adsf
qwret
nvfkbdsj
orthdfjgh
dfjrleih




For single character delimiter

Split string based on a character delimiter. Such as splitting string "adsf+qwer+poui+fdgh" with delimiter "+" will output {"adsf", "qwer", "poui", "fdg"h}

#include <iostream>
#include <sstream>
#include <vector>

using namespace std;

vector<string> split (const string &s, char delim) {
    vector<string> result;
    stringstream ss (s);
    string item;

    while (getline (ss, item, delim)) {
        result.push_back (item);
    }

    return result;
}

int main() {
    string str = "adsf+qwer+poui+fdgh";
    vector<string> v = split (str, '+');

    for (auto i : v) cout << i << endl;

    return 0;
}


Output

adsf
qwer
poui
fdgh
5
  • You are returning vector<string> I think it'll call copy constructor.
    – Mayur
    Nov 27 '18 at 8:21
  • 5
    Every reference I've seen shows that the call to the copy constructor is eliminated in that context. Jan 12 '19 at 9:50
  • With "modern" (C++03?) compilers I believe this is correct, RVO and/or move semantics will eliminate the copy constructor.
    – Kevin
    Mar 13 '19 at 14:09
  • I tried the one for single character delimiter, and if the string ends in a delimiter (i.e., an empty csv column at the end of the line), it does not return the empty string. It simply returns one fewer string. For example: 1,2,3,4\nA,B,C,
    – kounoupis
    Mar 26 '19 at 1:42
  • 1
    I also tried the one for string delimiter, and if the string ends in a delimiter, the last delimiter becomes part of the last string extracted.
    – kounoupis
    Mar 26 '19 at 1:44
57

You can use next function to split string:

vector<string> split(const string& str, const string& delim)
{
    vector<string> tokens;
    size_t prev = 0, pos = 0;
    do
    {
        pos = str.find(delim, prev);
        if (pos == string::npos) pos = str.length();
        string token = str.substr(prev, pos-prev);
        if (!token.empty()) tokens.push_back(token);
        prev = pos + delim.length();
    }
    while (pos < str.length() && prev < str.length());
    return tokens;
}
4
  • 8
    IMO it does't work as expected: split("abc","a") will return a vector or a single string, "bc", where I think it would make more sense if it had returned a vector of elements ["", "bc"]. Using str.split() in Python, it was intuitive to me that it should return an empty string in case delim was found either at the beginning or in the end, but that's just my opinion. Anyway, I just think it should be mentioned
    – kyriakosSt
    Nov 30 '18 at 18:26
  • 3
    Would strongly recommend removing the if (!token.empty()) prevent the issue mentioned by @kyriakosSt as well as other issues related to consecutive delimiters.
    – Steve
    Mar 12 '19 at 16:33
  • 1
    I would remove my upvote if I could, but SO won't let me. The issue brought up by @kyriakosSt is a problem, and removing if (!token.empty()) does not seem to suffice to fix it.
    – bhaller
    Nov 21 '19 at 0:22
  • 2
    @bhaller this sniplet was designed exactly to skip empty fragments. If you need to keep empty ones I'm afraid you need to write another split implementation. Kindly suggest you to post it here for the good of comunity.
    – Sviatoslav
    Feb 26 '20 at 21:28
25

You can also use regex for this:

std::vector<std::string> split(const std::string str, const std::string regex_str)
{
    std::regex regexz(regex_str);
    std::vector<std::string> list(std::sregex_token_iterator(str.begin(), str.end(), regexz, -1),
                                  std::sregex_token_iterator());
    return list;
}

which is equivalent to :

std::vector<std::string> split(const std::string str, const std::string regex_str)
{
    std::sregex_token_iterator token_iter(str.begin(), str.end(), regexz, -1);
    std::sregex_token_iterator end;
    std::vector<std::string> list;
    while (token_iter != end)
    {
        list.emplace_back(*token_iter++);
    }
    return list;
}

and use it like this :

#include <iostream>
#include <string>
#include <regex>

std::vector<std::string> split(const std::string str, const std::string regex_str)
{   // a yet more concise form!
    return { std::sregex_token_iterator(str.begin(), str.end(), std::regex(regex_str), -1), std::sregex_token_iterator() };
}

int main()
{
    std::string input_str = "lets split this";
    std::string regex_str = " "; 
    auto tokens = split(input_str, regex_str);
    for (auto& item: tokens)
    {
        std::cout<<item <<std::endl;
    }
}

play with it online! http://cpp.sh/9sumb

you can simply use substrings, characters, etc like normal, or use actual regular expressions to do the splitting.
its also concise and C++11!

6
  • 2
    This should be the correct answer, provided C++11 is on the table, which if it isn't...you should be using C++>=11, it's a game-changer! Jan 8 at 21:47
  • Please can you explain the return statement in the function split()? I am trying to figure how the tokens are pushed into the std::vector container. Thanks.
    – BFamz
    Feb 3 at 13:53
  • Would writing it as return std::vector<std::string>{ std::sregex_token_iterator(str.begin(), str.end(), std::regex(regex_str), -1), std::sregex_token_iterator() }; make it more obvious to you that how a temporary std::vector is being created and returned? we are using list initialization here. have a look here
    – Hossein
    Feb 3 at 15:29
  • 5
    @DeusXMachina: a fine solution, certainly. One caveat: the "yet more concise form!" in the last code segment will not compile with _LIBCPP_STD_VER > 11, as the method is marked as "delete"... but the earlier code segments that don't implicitly require rvalue reference && compile and run fine under C++2a.
    – pob
    Mar 25 at 4:19
  • @Rika yes that works. Thanks for your help.
    – BFamz
    Apr 12 at 13:51
20

This code splits lines from text, and add everyone into a vector.

vector<string> split(char *phrase, string delimiter){
    vector<string> list;
    string s = string(phrase);
    size_t pos = 0;
    string token;
    while ((pos = s.find(delimiter)) != string::npos) {
        token = s.substr(0, pos);
        list.push_back(token);
        s.erase(0, pos + delimiter.length());
    }
    list.push_back(s);
    return list;
}

Called by:

vector<string> listFilesMax = split(buffer, "\n");
6
  • it's working great! I've added list.push_back(s); because it was missing. May 25 '18 at 11:51
  • 1
    it misses out the last part of the string. After the while loop ends, we need to add the remaining of s as a new token.
    – whihathac
    Jun 1 '18 at 3:00
  • I've made an edit to the code sample to fix the missing push_back.
    – fret
    Nov 14 '18 at 1:25
  • 1
    It will be more nicer vector<string> split(char *phrase, const string delimiter="\n")
    – Mayur
    May 17 '19 at 9:28
  • I know kinda late but, it would work much better if this if statement was added before push if (token != "") list.push_back(token); to prevent appending empty strings. Jul 16 '20 at 21:37
17

strtok allows you to pass in multiple chars as delimiters. I bet if you passed in ">=" your example string would be split correctly (even though the > and = are counted as individual delimiters).

EDIT if you don't want to use c_str() to convert from string to char*, you can use substr and find_first_of to tokenize.

string token, mystring("scott>=tiger");
while(token != mystring){
  token = mystring.substr(0,mystring.find_first_of(">="));
  mystring = mystring.substr(mystring.find_first_of(">=") + 1);
  printf("%s ",token.c_str());
}
3
  • 3
    Thanks. But I want to use only C++ and not any C functions like strtok() as it would require me to use char array instead of string. Jan 10 '13 at 19:26
  • 2
    @TheCrazyProgrammer So? If a C function does what you need, use it. This isn't a world where C functions aren't available in C++ (in fact, they have to be). .c_str() is cheap and easy, too. Oct 14 '16 at 4:00
  • 1
    The check for if(token != mystring) gives wrong results if you have repeating elements in your string. I used your code to make a version that does not have this. It has many changes that change the answer fundamentally, so I wrote my own answer instead of editing. Check it below. Aug 28 '19 at 16:06
13

A way of doing it with C++20 :

#include <iostream>
#include <ranges>
#include <string_view>

int main()
{
    std::string hello = "text to be parsed";
    auto split = hello
        | std::ranges::views::split(' ')
        | std::ranges::views::transform([](auto&& str) { return std::string_view(&*str.begin(), std::ranges::distance(str)); });

    for (auto&& word : split)
    {
        std::cout << word << std::endl;
    }
}

See : https://stackoverflow.com/a/48403210/10771848 https://en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/ranges/split_view

10

Answer is already there, but selected-answer uses erase function which is very costly, think of some very big string(in MBs). Therefore I use below function.

vector<string> split(const string& i_str, const string& i_delim)
{
    vector<string> result;
    
    size_t found = i_str.find(i_delim);
    size_t startIndex = 0;

    while(found != string::npos)
    {
        result.push_back(string(i_str.begin()+startIndex, i_str.begin()+found));
        startIndex = found + i_delim.size();
        found = i_str.find(i_delim, startIndex);
    }
    if(startIndex != i_str.size())
        result.push_back(string(i_str.begin()+startIndex, i_str.end()));
    return result;      
}
1
  • 1
    I tested this, and it works. Thanks! In my opinion, this is the best answer because as the original answer-er states, this solution reduces the memory overhead, and the result is conveniently stored in a vector. (replicates the Python string.split() method.) Apr 28 '20 at 17:32
5

I would use boost::tokenizer. Here's documentation explaining how to make an appropriate tokenizer function: http://www.boost.org/doc/libs/1_52_0/libs/tokenizer/tokenizerfunction.htm

Here's one that works for your case.

struct my_tokenizer_func
{
    template<typename It>
    bool operator()(It& next, It end, std::string & tok)
    {
        if (next == end)
            return false;
        char const * del = ">=";
        auto pos = std::search(next, end, del, del + 2);
        tok.assign(next, pos);
        next = pos;
        if (next != end)
            std::advance(next, 2);
        return true;
    }

    void reset() {}
};

int main()
{
    std::string to_be_parsed = "1) one>=2) two>=3) three>=4) four";
    for (auto i : boost::tokenizer<my_tokenizer_func>(to_be_parsed))
        std::cout << i << '\n';
}
2
  • 3
    Thanks. But I want to wish only standard C++ and not a third party library. Jan 10 '13 at 19:49
  • @TheCrazyProgrammer: Okay, when I read "Standard C++", I thought that meant no non-standard extensions, not that you couldn't use standards conforming third party libraries. Jan 10 '13 at 19:58
5

Here's my take on this. It handles the edge cases and takes an optional parameter to remove empty entries from the results.

bool endsWith(const std::string& s, const std::string& suffix)
{
    return s.size() >= suffix.size() &&
           s.substr(s.size() - suffix.size()) == suffix;
}

std::vector<std::string> split(const std::string& s, const std::string& delimiter, const bool& removeEmptyEntries = false)
{
    std::vector<std::string> tokens;

    for (size_t start = 0, end; start < s.length(); start = end + delimiter.length())
    {
         size_t position = s.find(delimiter, start);
         end = position != string::npos ? position : s.length();

         std::string token = s.substr(start, end - start);
         if (!removeEmptyEntries || !token.empty())
         {
             tokens.push_back(token);
         }
    }

    if (!removeEmptyEntries &&
        (s.empty() || endsWith(s, delimiter)))
    {
        tokens.push_back("");
    }

    return tokens;
}

Examples

split("a-b-c", "-"); // [3]("a","b","c")

split("a--c", "-"); // [3]("a","","c")

split("-b-", "-"); // [3]("","b","")

split("--c--", "-"); // [5]("","","c","","")

split("--c--", "-", true); // [1]("c")

split("a", "-"); // [1]("a")

split("", "-"); // [1]("")

split("", "-", true); // [0]()
5

This should work perfectly for string (or single character) delimiters. Don't forget to include #include <sstream>.

std::string input = "Alfa=,+Bravo=,+Charlie=,+Delta";
std::string delimiter = "=,+"; 
std::istringstream ss(input);
std::string token;
std::string::iterator it;

while(std::getline(ss, token, *(it = delimiter.begin()))) {
    std::cout << token << std::endl; // Token is extracted using '='
    it++;
    // Skip the rest of delimiter if exists ",+"
    while(it != delimiter.end() and ss.peek() == *(it)) { 
        it++; ss.get(); 
    }
}

The first while loop extracts a token using the first character of the string delimiter. The second while loop skips the rest of the delimiter and stops at the beginning of the next token.

2
  • This is incorrect. If the input is modified as below, it would split using the first =, when it is not supposed to: std::string input = "Alfa=,+Bravo=,+Charlie=,+Delta=Echo";
    – Amitoj
    Mar 9 at 7:27
  • @Amitoj Good catch. I revised my answer to even cover inputs with malformed delimiters.
    – hmofrad
    Mar 9 at 16:09
3

This is a complete method that splits the string on any delimiter and returns a vector of the chopped up strings.

It is an adaptation from the answer from ryanbwork. However, his check for: if(token != mystring) gives wrong results if you have repeating elements in your string. This is my solution to that problem.

vector<string> Split(string mystring, string delimiter)
{
    vector<string> subStringList;
    string token;
    while (true)
    {
        size_t findfirst = mystring.find_first_of(delimiter);
        if (findfirst == string::npos) //find_first_of returns npos if it couldn't find the delimiter anymore
        {
            subStringList.push_back(mystring); //push back the final piece of mystring
            return subStringList;
        }
        token = mystring.substr(0, mystring.find_first_of(delimiter));
        mystring = mystring.substr(mystring.find_first_of(delimiter) + 1);
        subStringList.push_back(token);
    }
    return subStringList;
}
1
  • 2
    Something like while (true) is usually scary to see in a piece of code like this. Personally I'd recommend rewriting this so that the comparison to std::string::npos (or respectively a check against mystring.size()) makes the while (true) obsolete. Dec 4 '19 at 16:58
3

A very simple/naive approach:

vector<string> words_seperate(string s){
    vector<string> ans;
    string w="";
    for(auto i:s){
        if(i==' '){
           ans.push_back(w);
           w="";
        }
        else{
           w+=i;
        }
    }
    ans.push_back(w);
    return ans;
}

Or you can use boost library split function:

vector<string> result; 
boost::split(result, input, boost::is_any_of("\t"));

Or You can try TOKEN or strtok:

char str[] = "DELIMIT-ME-C++"; 
char *token = strtok(str, "-"); 
while (token) 
{ 
    cout<<token; 
    token = strtok(NULL, "-"); 
} 

Or You can do this:

char split_with=' ';
vector<string> words;
string token; 
stringstream ss(our_string);
while(getline(ss , token , split_with)) words.push_back(token);
2

Since this is the top-rated Stack Overflow Google search result for C++ split string or similar, I'll post a complete, copy/paste runnable example that shows both methods.

splitString uses stringstream (probably the better and easier option in most cases)

splitString2 uses find and substr (a more manual approach)

// SplitString.cpp

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <string>
#include <sstream>

// function prototypes
std::vector<std::string> splitString(const std::string& str, char delim);
std::vector<std::string> splitString2(const std::string& str, char delim);
std::string getSubstring(const std::string& str, int leftIdx, int rightIdx);


int main(void)
{
  // Test cases - all will pass
  
  std::string str = "ab,cd,ef";
  //std::string str = "abcdef";
  //std::string str = "";
  //std::string str = ",cd,ef";
  //std::string str = "ab,cd,";   // behavior of splitString and splitString2 is different for this final case only, if this case matters to you choose which one you need as applicable
  
  
  std::vector<std::string> tokens = splitString(str, ',');
  
  std::cout << "tokens: " << "\n";
  
  if (tokens.empty())
  {
    std::cout << "(tokens is empty)" << "\n";
  }
  else
  {
    for (auto& token : tokens)
    {
      if (token == "") std::cout << "(empty string)" << "\n";
      else std::cout << token << "\n";
    }
  }
    
  return 0;
}

std::vector<std::string> splitString(const std::string& str, char delim)
{
  std::vector<std::string> tokens;
  
  if (str == "") return tokens;
  
  std::string currentToken;
  
  std::stringstream ss(str);
  
  while (std::getline(ss, currentToken, delim))
  {
    tokens.push_back(currentToken);
  }
  
  return tokens;
}

std::vector<std::string> splitString2(const std::string& str, char delim)
{
  std::vector<std::string> tokens;
  
  if (str == "") return tokens;
  
  int leftIdx = 0;
  
  int delimIdx = str.find(delim);
  
  int rightIdx;
  
  while (delimIdx != std::string::npos)
  {
    rightIdx = delimIdx - 1;
    
    std::string token = getSubstring(str, leftIdx, rightIdx);
    tokens.push_back(token);
    
    // prep for next time around
    leftIdx = delimIdx + 1;
    
    delimIdx = str.find(delim, delimIdx + 1);
  }
  
  rightIdx = str.size() - 1;
  
  std::string token = getSubstring(str, leftIdx, rightIdx);
  tokens.push_back(token);
  
  return tokens;
}

std::string getSubstring(const std::string& str, int leftIdx, int rightIdx)
{
  return str.substr(leftIdx, rightIdx - leftIdx + 1);
}
2

Yet another answer: Here I'm using find_first_not_of string function which returns the position of the first character that does not match any of the characters specified in the delim.

size_t find_first_not_of(const string& delim, size_t pos = 0) const noexcept;

Example:

int main()
{
    size_t start = 0, end = 0;
    std::string str = "scott>=tiger>=cat";
    std::string delim = ">=";
    while ((start = str.find_first_not_of(delim, end)) != std::string::npos)
    {
        end = str.find(delim, start); // finds the 'first' occurance from the 'start'
        std::cout << str.substr(start, end - start)<<std::endl; // extract substring
    }
    return 0;
}

Output:

    scott
    tiger
    cat
2

I make this solution. It is very simple, all the prints/values are in the loop (no need to check after the loop).

#include <iostream>
#include <string>

using std::cout;
using std::string;

int main() {
    string s = "it-+is-+working!";
    string d = "-+";

    int firstFindI = 0;
    int secendFindI = s.find(d, 0); // find if have any at all
    while (secendFindI != string::npos)
    {
        secendFindI = s.find(d, firstFindI);
        cout << s.substr(firstFindI, secendFindI - firstFindI) << "\n"; // print sliced part
        firstFindI = secendFindI + d.size(); // add to the search index
    }

}

The only downside of this solution is that is doing a search twice in the start.

1

If you do not want to modify the string (as in the answer by Vincenzo Pii) and want to output the last token as well, you may want to use this approach:

inline std::vector<std::string> splitString( const std::string &s, const std::string &delimiter ){
    std::vector<std::string> ret;
    size_t start = 0;
    size_t end = 0;
    size_t len = 0;
    std::string token;
    do{ end = s.find(delimiter,start); 
        len = end - start;
        token = s.substr(start, len);
        ret.emplace_back( token );
        start += len + delimiter.length();
        std::cout << token << std::endl;
    }while ( end != std::string::npos );
    return ret;
}
1
std::vector<std::string> parse(std::string str,std::string delim){
    std::vector<std::string> tokens;
    char *str_c = strdup(str.c_str()); 
    char* token = NULL;

    token = strtok(str_c, delim.c_str()); 
    while (token != NULL) { 
        tokens.push_back(std::string(token));  
        token = strtok(NULL, delim.c_str()); 
    }

    delete[] str_c;

    return tokens;
}
1

Here's a concise split function. I decided to have back to back delimiters return as an empty string but you could easily check that if the substring is empty and not add it to the vector if it is.

#include <vector>
#include <string>
using namespace std;



vector<string> split(string to_split, string delimiter) {
    size_t pos = 0;
    vector<string> matches{};
    do {
        pos = to_split.find(delimiter);
        int change_end;
        if (pos == string::npos) {
            pos = to_split.length() - 1;
            change_end = 1;
        }
        else {
            change_end = 0;
        }
        matches.push_back(to_split.substr(0, pos+change_end));
        
        to_split.erase(0, pos+1);

    }
    while (!to_split.empty());
    return matches;

}
1

This is similar to other answers but it's using string_view. So these are just views for the original string. Similar to the c++20 example. Though this would be a c++17 example. (edit to skip empty matches)

#include <algorithm>
#include <iostream>
#include <string_view>
#include <vector>
std::vector<std::string_view> split(std::string_view buffer,
                                    const std::string_view delimeter = " ") {
  std::vector<std::string_view> ret{};
  std::decay_t<decltype(std::string_view::npos)> pos{};
  while ((pos = buffer.find(delimeter)) != std::string_view::npos) {
    const auto match = buffer.substr(0, pos);
    if (!match.empty()) ret.push_back(match);
    buffer = buffer.substr(pos + delimeter.size());
  }
  if (!buffer.empty()) ret.push_back(buffer);
  return ret;
}
int main() {
  const auto split_values = split("1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9     10 ");
  std::for_each(split_values.begin(), split_values.end(),
                [](const auto& str) { std::cout << str << '\n'; });
  return split_values.size();
}
0
#include<iostream>
#include<algorithm>
using namespace std;

int split_count(string str,char delimit){
return count(str.begin(),str.end(),delimit);
}

void split(string str,char delimit,string res[]){
int a=0,i=0;
while(a<str.size()){
res[i]=str.substr(a,str.find(delimit));
a+=res[i].size()+1;
i++;
}
}

int main(){

string a="abc.xyz.mno.def";
int x=split_count(a,'.')+1;
string res[x];
split(a,'.',res);

for(int i=0;i<x;i++)
cout<<res[i]<<endl;
  return 0;
}

P.S: Works only if the lengths of the strings after splitting are equal

1
  • This use GCC extension -- variable length array.
    – user202729
    Apr 10 '18 at 8:58
0

Function:

std::vector<std::string> WSJCppCore::split(const std::string& sWhat, const std::string& sDelim) {
    std::vector<std::string> vRet;
    size_t nPos = 0;
    size_t nLen = sWhat.length();
    size_t nDelimLen = sDelim.length();
    while (nPos < nLen) {
        std::size_t nFoundPos = sWhat.find(sDelim, nPos);
        if (nFoundPos != std::string::npos) {
            std::string sToken = sWhat.substr(nPos, nFoundPos - nPos);
            vRet.push_back(sToken);
            nPos = nFoundPos + nDelimLen;
            if (nFoundPos + nDelimLen == nLen) { // last delimiter
                vRet.push_back("");
            }
        } else {
            std::string sToken = sWhat.substr(nPos, nLen - nPos);
            vRet.push_back(sToken);
            break;
        }
    }
    return vRet;
}

Unit-tests:

bool UnitTestSplit::run() {
bool bTestSuccess = true;

    struct LTest {
        LTest(
            const std::string &sStr,
            const std::string &sDelim,
            const std::vector<std::string> &vExpectedVector
        ) {
            this->sStr = sStr;
            this->sDelim = sDelim;
            this->vExpectedVector = vExpectedVector;
        };
        std::string sStr;
        std::string sDelim;
        std::vector<std::string> vExpectedVector;
    };
    std::vector<LTest> tests;
    tests.push_back(LTest("1 2 3 4 5", " ", {"1", "2", "3", "4", "5"}));
    tests.push_back(LTest("|1f|2п|3%^|44354|5kdasjfdre|2", "|", {"", "1f", "2п", "3%^", "44354", "5kdasjfdre", "2"}));
    tests.push_back(LTest("|1f|2п|3%^|44354|5kdasjfdre|", "|", {"", "1f", "2п", "3%^", "44354", "5kdasjfdre", ""}));
    tests.push_back(LTest("some1 => some2 => some3", "=>", {"some1 ", " some2 ", " some3"}));
    tests.push_back(LTest("some1 => some2 => some3 =>", "=>", {"some1 ", " some2 ", " some3 ", ""}));

    for (int i = 0; i < tests.size(); i++) {
        LTest test = tests[i];
        std::string sPrefix = "test" + std::to_string(i) + "(\"" + test.sStr + "\")";
        std::vector<std::string> vSplitted = WSJCppCore::split(test.sStr, test.sDelim);
        compareN(bTestSuccess, sPrefix + ": size", vSplitted.size(), test.vExpectedVector.size());
        int nMin = std::min(vSplitted.size(), test.vExpectedVector.size());
        for (int n = 0; n < nMin; n++) {
            compareS(bTestSuccess, sPrefix + ", element: " + std::to_string(n), vSplitted[n], test.vExpectedVector[n]);
        }
    }

    return bTestSuccess;
}
0

As a bonus, here is a code example of a split function and macro that is easy to use and where you can choose the container type :

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <string>

#define split(str, delim, type) (split_fn<type<std::string>>(str, delim))
 
template <typename Container>
Container split_fn(const std::string& str, char delim = ' ') {
    Container cont{};
    std::size_t current, previous = 0;
    current = str.find(delim);
    while (current != std::string::npos) {
        cont.push_back(str.substr(previous, current - previous));
        previous = current + 1;
        current = str.find(delim, previous);
    }
    cont.push_back(str.substr(previous, current - previous));
    
    return cont;
}

int main() {
    
    auto test = std::string{"This is a great test"};
    auto res = split(test, ' ', std::vector);
    
    for(auto &i : res) {
        std::cout << i << ", "; // "this", "is", "a", "great", "test"
    }
    
    
    return 0;
}
0

i use pointer arithmetic. inner while for string delimeter if you satify with char delim just remove inner while simply. i hope it is correct. if you notice any mistake or improve please leave the comment.

std::vector<std::string> split(std::string s, std::string delim)
{
    char *p = &s[0];
    char *d = &delim[0];
    std::vector<std::string> res = {""};

    do
    {
        bool is_delim = true;
        char *pp = p;
        char *dd = d;
        while (*dd && is_delim == true)
            if (*pp++ != *dd++)
                is_delim = false;

        if (is_delim)
        {
            p = pp - 1;
            res.push_back("");
        }
        else
            *(res.rbegin()) += *p;
    } while (*p++);

    return res;
}
1
  • Welcome to Stack Overflow. While this code may solve the question, including an explanation of how and why this solves the problem would really help to improve the quality of your post, and probably result in more up-votes. Remember that you are answering the question for readers in the future, not just the person asking now. Please edit your answer to add explanations and give an indication of what limitations and assumptions apply.
    – Sach
    May 8 at 3:25
0
template<typename C, typename T>
auto insert_in_container(C& c, T&& t) -> decltype(c.push_back(std::forward<T>(t)), void()) {
    c.push_back(std::forward<T>(t));
}
template<typename C, typename T>
auto insert_in_container(C& c, T&& t) -> decltype(c.insert(std::forward<T>(t)), void()) {
    c.insert(std::forward<T>(t));
}
template<typename Container>
Container splitR(const std::string& input, const std::string& delims) {
    Container out;
    size_t delims_len = delims.size();
    auto begIdx = 0u;
    auto endIdx = input.find(delims, begIdx);
    if (endIdx == std::string::npos && input.size() != 0u) {
        insert_in_container(out, input);
    }
    else {
        size_t w = 0;
        while (endIdx != std::string::npos) {
            w = endIdx - begIdx;
            if (w != 0) insert_in_container(out, input.substr(begIdx, w));
            begIdx = endIdx + delims_len;
            endIdx = input.find(delims, begIdx);
        }
        w = input.length() - begIdx;
        if (w != 0) insert_in_container(out, input.substr(begIdx, w));
    }
    return out;
}
0

Just in case in the future, someone wants out of the box function of Vincenzo Pii 's answer

#include <vector>
#include <string>


std::vector<std::string> SplitString(
    std::string str,
    std::string delimeter)
{
    std::vector<std::string> splittedStrings = {};
    size_t pos = 0;

    while ((pos = str.find(delimeter)) != std::string::npos)
    {
        std::string token = str.substr(0, pos);
        if (token.length() > 0)
            splittedStrings.push_back(token);
        str.erase(0, pos + delimeter.length());
    }

    if (str.length() > 0)
        splittedStrings.push_back(str);
    return splittedStrings;
}

I also fixed some bugs so that the function won't return an empty string if there is a delimiter at the start or the end of the string

-1

Since C++11 it can be done like this:

std::vector<std::string> splitString(const std::string& str,
                                     const std::regex& regex)
{
  return {std::sregex_token_iterator{str.begin(), str.end(), regex, -1}, 
          std::sregex_token_iterator() };
} 

// usually we have a predefined set of regular expressions: then
// let's build those only once and re-use them multiple times
static const std::regex regex1(R"some-reg-exp1", std::regex::optimize);
static const std::regex regex2(R"some-reg-exp2", std::regex::optimize);
static const std::regex regex3(R"some-reg-exp3", std::regex::optimize);

string str = "some string to split";
std::vector<std::string> tokens( splitString(str, regex1) ); 

Notes:

1
  • 1
    This is an incomplete answer, not really doing or explaining anything.
    – not2qubit
    May 18 at 21:52
-4
std::vector<std::string> split(const std::string& s, char c) {
  std::vector<std::string> v;
  unsigned int ii = 0;
  unsigned int j = s.find(c);
  while (j < s.length()) {
    v.push_back(s.substr(i, j - i));
    i = ++j;
    j = s.find(c, j);
    if (j >= s.length()) {
      v.push_back(s.substr(i, s,length()));
      break;
    }
  }
  return v;
}
1
  • 2
    Please be more accurate. Your code will not compile. See declaration of "i" and the comma instead of a dot.
    – jstuardo
    Mar 30 '17 at 12:28

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