262

I am parsing a string in C++ using the following:

string parsed,input="text to be parsed";
stringstream input_stringstream(input);

if(getline(input_stringstream,parsed,' '))
{
     // do some processing.
}

Parsing with a single char delimiter is fine. But what if I want to use a string as delimiter.

Example: I want to split:

scott>=tiger

with >= as delimiter so that I can get scott and tiger.

  • 9
    Closed as exact duplicate?? But I was not able to find the answer as per my requirement in other questions all were either too complex or were using 3rd party libraries. – TheCrazyProgrammer Jan 11 '13 at 17:28
  • 14
    This question is definitely NOT a duplicate of "Splitting a string in C++". – Emmanuel Oct 3 '13 at 15:21
  • 8
    "Splitting a string in C++" only deals with splitting a string by a single character. This is not a duplicate. – 735Tesla Feb 5 '14 at 1:20
  • 2
    This so called duplicate is not a duplicate of the mentioned question. The answers to the other question are of exceptionally low quality, despite having high votes. Most of them can't take a deliminator other than a line break, so no this isn't a duplicate. – Celeritas Sep 28 '14 at 22:02
  • 2
    This is not a duplicate, I have voted to reopen it. – Searene Dec 22 '18 at 13:39

11 Answers 11

453

You can use the std::string::find() function to find the position of your string delimiter, then use std::string::substr() to get a token.

Example:

std::string s = "scott>=tiger";
std::string delimiter = ">=";
std::string token = s.substr(0, s.find(delimiter)); // token is "scott"
  • The find(const string& str, size_t pos = 0) function returns the position of the first occurrence of str in the string, or npos if the string is not found.

  • The substr(size_t pos = 0, size_t n = npos) function returns a substring of the object, starting at position pos and of length npos.


If you have multiple delimiters, after you have extracted one token, you can remove it (delimiter included) to proceed with subsequent extractions (if you want to preserve the original string, just use s = s.substr(pos + delimiter.length());):

s.erase(0, s.find(delimiter) + delimiter.length());

This way you can easily loop to get each token.

Complete Example

std::string s = "scott>=tiger>=mushroom";
std::string delimiter = ">=";

size_t pos = 0;
std::string token;
while ((pos = s.find(delimiter)) != std::string::npos) {
    token = s.substr(0, pos);
    std::cout << token << std::endl;
    s.erase(0, pos + delimiter.length());
}
std::cout << s << std::endl;

Output:

scott
tiger
mushroom
  • 50
    For those who don't want to modify the input string, do size_t last = 0; size_t next = 0; while ((next = s.find(delimiter, last)) != string::npos) { cout << s.substr(last, next-last) << endl; last = next + 1; } cout << s.substr(last) << endl; – hayk.mart Jan 31 '15 at 5:07
  • 18
    NOTE: mushroom outputs outside of the loop, i.e. s = mushroom – Don Larynx Jan 31 '15 at 22:22
  • Those samples does not extract the last token from string. A sample of mine extracting an IpV4 from one string: <code>size_t last = 0; size_t next = 0; int index = 0; while (index<4) { next = str.find(delimiter, last); auto number = str.substr(last, next - last); IPv4[index++] = atoi(number.c_str()); last = next + 1; }</code> – rfog Aug 17 '15 at 8:00
  • 2
    @hayk.mart Just a note, that would be the following, you need add 2 not 1 due to the size of the delimiter which is 2 characters :) : std::string s = "scott>=tiger>=mushroom"; std::string delimiter = ">="; size_t last = 0; size_t next = 0; while ((next = s.find(delimiter, last)) != std::string::npos) { std::cout << s.substr(last, next-last) << std::endl; last = next + 2; } std::cout << s.substr(last) << std::endl; – ervinbosenbacher Oct 30 '15 at 12:52
  • In order to get "tiger", use std::string token = s.substr(s.find(delimiter) + 1);, if you are sure that it exists (I use +1 in the length)... – gsamaras Apr 2 at 16:45
44

This method uses std::string::find without mutating the original string by remembering the beginning and end of the previous substring token.

#include <iostream>
#include <string>

int main()
{
    std::string s = "scott>=tiger";
    std::string delim = ">=";

    auto start = 0U;
    auto end = s.find(delim);
    while (end != std::string::npos)
    {
        std::cout << s.substr(start, end - start) << std::endl;
        start = end + delim.length();
        end = s.find(delim, start);
    }

    std::cout << s.substr(start, end);
}
29

You can use next function to split string:

vector<string> split(const string& str, const string& delim)
{
    vector<string> tokens;
    size_t prev = 0, pos = 0;
    do
    {
        pos = str.find(delim, prev);
        if (pos == string::npos) pos = str.length();
        string token = str.substr(prev, pos-prev);
        if (!token.empty()) tokens.push_back(token);
        prev = pos + delim.length();
    }
    while (pos < str.length() && prev < str.length());
    return tokens;
}
  • 3
    IMO it does't work as expected: split("abc","a") will return a vector or a single string, "bc", where I think it would make more sense if it had returned a vector of elements ["", "bc"]. Using str.split() in Python, it was intuitive to me that it should return an empty string in case delim was found either at the beginning or in the end, but that's just my opinion. Anyway, I just think it should be mentioned – kyriakosSt Nov 30 '18 at 18:26
  • Would strongly recommend removing the if (!token.empty()) prevent the issue mentioned by @kyriakosSt as well as other issues related to consecutive delimiters. – Steve Mar 12 at 16:33
13

strtok allows you to pass in multiple chars as delimiters. I bet if you passed in ">=" your example string would be split correctly (even though the > and = are counted as individual delimiters).

EDIT if you don't want to use c_str() to convert from string to char*, you can use substr and find_first_of to tokenize.

string token, mystring("scott>=tiger");
while(token != mystring){
  token = mystring.substr(0,mystring.find_first_of(">="));
  mystring = mystring.substr(mystring.find_first_of(">=") + 1);
  printf("%s ",token.c_str());
}
  • 2
    Thanks. But I want to use only C++ and not any C functions like strtok() as it would require me to use char array instead of string. – TheCrazyProgrammer Jan 10 '13 at 19:26
  • 1
    @TheCrazyProgrammer see my edits – ryanbwork Jan 10 '13 at 19:53
  • 2
    @TheCrazyProgrammer So? If a C function does what you need, use it. This isn't a world where C functions aren't available in C++ (in fact, they have to be). .c_str() is cheap and easy, too. – Qix Oct 14 '16 at 4:00
13

For string delimiter

Split string based on a string delimiter. Such as splitting string "adsf-+qwret-+nvfkbdsj-+orthdfjgh-+dfjrleih" based on string delimiter "-+", output will be {"adsf", "qwret", "nvfkbdsj", "orthdfjgh", "dfjrleih"}

#include <iostream>
#include <sstream>
#include <vector>

using namespace std;

// for string delimiter
vector<string> split (string s, string delimiter) {
    size_t pos_start = 0, pos_end, delim_len = delimiter.length();
    string token;
    vector<string> res;

    while ((pos_end = s.find (delimiter, pos_start)) != string::npos) {
        token = s.substr (pos_start, pos_end - pos_start);
        pos_start = pos_end + delim_len;
        res.push_back (token);
    }

    res.push_back (s.substr (pos_start));
    return res;
}

int main() {
    string str = "adsf-+qwret-+nvfkbdsj-+orthdfjgh-+dfjrleih";
    string delimiter = "-+";
    vector<string> v = split (str, delimiter);

    for (auto i : v) cout << i << endl;

    return 0;
}


Output

adsf
qwret
nvfkbdsj
orthdfjgh
dfjrleih




For single character delimiter

Split string based on a character delimiter. Such as splitting string "adsf+qwer+poui+fdgh" with delimiter "+" will output {"adsf", "qwer", "poui", "fdg"h}

#include <iostream>
#include <sstream>
#include <vector>

using namespace std;

vector<string> split (const string &s, char delim) {
    vector<string> result;
    stringstream ss (s);
    string item;

    while (getline (ss, item, delim)) {
        result.push_back (item);
    }

    return result;
}

int main() {
    string str = "adsf+qwer+poui+fdgh";
    vector<string> v = split (str, '+');

    for (auto i : v) cout << i << endl;

    return 0;
}


Output

adsf
qwer
poui
fdgh
  • You are returning vector<string> I think it'll call copy constructor. – Mayur Nov 27 '18 at 8:21
  • 1
    Every reference I've seen shows that the call to the copy constructor is eliminated in that context. – David Given Jan 12 at 9:50
  • With "modern" (C++03?) compilers I believe this is correct, RVO and/or move semantics will eliminate the copy constructor. – Kevin Mar 13 at 14:09
  • I tried the one for single character delimiter, and if the string ends in a delimiter (i.e., an empty csv column at the end of the line), it does not return the empty string. It simply returns one fewer string. For example: 1,2,3,4\nA,B,C, – kounoupis Mar 26 at 1:42
  • I also tried the one for string delimiter, and if the string ends in a delimiter, the last delimiter becomes part of the last string extracted. – kounoupis Mar 26 at 1:44
11

This code splits lines from text, and add everyone into a vector.

vector<string> split(char *phrase, string delimiter){
    vector<string> list;
    string s = string(phrase);
    size_t pos = 0;
    string token;
    while ((pos = s.find(delimiter)) != string::npos) {
        token = s.substr(0, pos);
        list.push_back(token);
        s.erase(0, pos + delimiter.length());
    }
    list.push_back(s);
    return list;
}

Called by:

vector<string> listFilesMax = split(buffer, "\n");
  • it's working great! I've added list.push_back(s); because it was missing. – Stoica Mircea May 25 '18 at 11:51
  • 1
    it misses out the last part of the string. After the while loop ends, we need to add the remaining of s as a new token. – whihathac Jun 1 '18 at 3:00
  • I've made an edit to the code sample to fix the missing push_back. – fret Nov 14 '18 at 1:25
  • 1
    It will be more nicer vector<string> split(char *phrase, const string delimiter="\n") – Mayur May 17 at 9:28
4

I would use boost::tokenizer. Here's documentation explaining how to make an appropriate tokenizer function: http://www.boost.org/doc/libs/1_52_0/libs/tokenizer/tokenizerfunction.htm

Here's one that works for your case.

struct my_tokenizer_func
{
    template<typename It>
    bool operator()(It& next, It end, std::string & tok)
    {
        if (next == end)
            return false;
        char const * del = ">=";
        auto pos = std::search(next, end, del, del + 2);
        tok.assign(next, pos);
        next = pos;
        if (next != end)
            std::advance(next, 2);
        return true;
    }

    void reset() {}
};

int main()
{
    std::string to_be_parsed = "1) one>=2) two>=3) three>=4) four";
    for (auto i : boost::tokenizer<my_tokenizer_func>(to_be_parsed))
        std::cout << i << '\n';
}
  • 1
    Thanks. But I want to wish only standard C++ and not a third party library. – TheCrazyProgrammer Jan 10 '13 at 19:49
  • @TheCrazyProgrammer: Okay, when I read "Standard C++", I thought that meant no non-standard extensions, not that you couldn't use standards conforming third party libraries. – Benjamin Lindley Jan 10 '13 at 19:58
3

Here's my take on this. It handles the edge cases and takes an optional parameter to remove empty entries from the results.

bool endsWith(const std::string& s, const std::string& suffix)
{
    return s.size() >= suffix.size() &&
           s.substr(s.size() - suffix.size()) == suffix;
}

std::vector<std::string> split(const std::string& s, const std::string& delimiter, const bool& removeEmptyEntries = false)
{
    std::vector<std::string> tokens;

    for (size_t start = 0, end; start < s.length(); start = end + delimiter.length())
    {
         size_t position = s.find(delimiter, start);
         end = position != string::npos ? position : s.length();

         std::string token = s.substr(start, end - start);
         if (!removeEmptyEntries || !token.empty())
         {
             tokens.push_back(token);
         }
    }

    if (!removeEmptyEntries &&
        (s.empty() || endsWith(s, delimiter)))
    {
        tokens.push_back("");
    }

    return tokens;
}

Examples

split("a-b-c", "-"); // [3]("a","b","c")

split("a--c", "-"); // [3]("a","","c")

split("-b-", "-"); // [3]("","b","")

split("--c--", "-"); // [5]("","","c","","")

split("--c--", "-", true); // [1]("c")

split("a", "-"); // [1]("a")

split("", "-"); // [1]("")

split("", "-", true); // [0]()
1

If you do not want to modify the string (as in the answer by Vincenzo Pii) and want to output the last token as well, you may want to use this approach:

inline std::vector<std::string> splitString( const std::string &s, const std::string &delimiter ){
    std::vector<std::string> ret;
    size_t start = 0;
    size_t end = 0;
    size_t len = 0;
    std::string token;
    do{ end = s.find(delimiter,start); 
        len = end - start;
        token = s.substr(start, len);
        ret.emplace_back( token );
        start += len + delimiter.length();
        std::cout << token << std::endl;
    }while ( end != std::string::npos );
    return ret;
}
0
#include<iostream>
#include<algorithm>
using namespace std;

int split_count(string str,char delimit){
return count(str.begin(),str.end(),delimit);
}

void split(string str,char delimit,string res[]){
int a=0,i=0;
while(a<str.size()){
res[i]=str.substr(a,str.find(delimit));
a+=res[i].size()+1;
i++;
}
}

int main(){

string a="abc.xyz.mno.def";
int x=split_count(a,'.')+1;
string res[x];
split(a,'.',res);

for(int i=0;i<x;i++)
cout<<res[i]<<endl;
  return 0;
}

P.S: Works only if the lengths of the strings after splitting are equal

  • This use GCC extension -- variable length array. – user202729 Apr 10 '18 at 8:58
-3
std::vector<std::string> split(const std::string& s, char c) {
  std::vector<std::string> v;
  unsigned int ii = 0;
  unsigned int j = s.find(c);
  while (j < s.length()) {
    v.push_back(s.substr(i, j - i));
    i = ++j;
    j = s.find(c, j);
    if (j >= s.length()) {
      v.push_back(s.substr(i, s,length()));
      break;
    }
  }
  return v;
}
  • 1
    Please be more accurate. Your code will not compile. See declaration of "i" and the comma instead of a dot. – jstuardo Mar 30 '17 at 12:28

protected by eyllanesc Apr 26 '18 at 23:44

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