2

I'm trying to rotate a simple triangle. The problem is that while it rotates correctly, it decrease its size until it disappears.

Some pieces of my code so far:

// Vertices
GLfloat vertexArray[] = 
{
    1.0f, -1.0f, 0.0f,
    -1.0f, -1.0f, 0.0f,
    0.0f,  1.0f, 0.0f,
};

// Render funcion (called every frame)
void render()
{
    glClearColor(0.0f, 0.0f, 0.4f, 1.0f);
    glClear(GL_COLOR_BUFFER_BIT);

    glBindBuffer(GL_ARRAY_BUFFER, vertexBufferObj);
    glBufferData(GL_ARRAY_BUFFER, sizeof(vertexArray), vertexArray, GL_DYNAMIC_DRAW); 
    glUseProgram(programID); // simple vertex/frag shader

    glDrawArrays(GL_TRIANGLES, 0, 3);

    // Swap buffers
    glfwSwapBuffers();
}

// Update funcion (called every frame before render function)
void update(float elapsedTime)
{
    printf("elapsedTime: %f \r", elapsedTime);

    float static theta = elapsedTime * 0.2f;

    for(int i = 0; i < 9; i+=3)
    {
        vertexArray[i] =   (vertexArray[i] * cosf(theta)) - (vertexArray[i+1] * sinf(theta));
        vertexArray[i+1] = (vertexArray[i] * sinf(theta)) + (vertexArray[i+1] * cosf(theta));
        vertexArray[i+2] = 0;
    }
}

As you can see, I'm rotating every vertex on update function with a for loop. Maybe the best way to do this is using the shader (correct me if I'm wrong), but I wanted to keep things simple here just to illustrate the problem.

6
  • 4
    May the problem be with the fact that in every step of your for loop you keep using a variable modified in the first step?
    – Andy Prowl
    Jan 10, 2013 at 20:58
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    What I mean is: when you do vertexArray[i+1] = (vertexArray[i] * sinf(theta)) + (vertexArray[i+1] * cosf(theta)); you are not using the value of vertexArray[i] from the previous iteration, but rather the new vertexArray[i] computed in the first assignment of the for loop. Just guessing, I haven't worked out the math
    – Andy Prowl
    Jan 10, 2013 at 21:00
  • Yes, you are right! float x = vertexArray[i]; float y = vertexArray[i+1]; vertexArray[i] = (x * cosf(theta)) - (y * sinf(theta)); vertexArray[i+1] = (x * sinf(theta)) + (y * cosf(theta)); solved the problem.
    – user1697973
    Jan 10, 2013 at 21:04
  • 1
    @Lucaswrk: I posted an answer below with the code
    – Andy Prowl
    Jan 10, 2013 at 21:06
  • Why just not to use matrices ?
    – Michael IV
    Jan 11, 2013 at 10:09

1 Answer 1

3

I believe the problem is, that when you compute vertexArray[i+1] = (vertexArray[i] * sinf(theta)) + (vertexArray[i+1] * cosf(theta)); you are not using the value of vertexArray[i] from the previous iteration, but rather the new vertexArray[i] computed in the first assignment of the for loop.

Try this:

for(int i = 0; i < 9; i+=3)
{
    double tmp = vertexArray[i];

    vertexArray[i] = (tmp * cosf(theta)) - (vertexArray[i+1] * sinf(theta));
    vertexArray[i+1] = (tmp * sinf(theta)) + (vertexArray[i+1] * cosf(theta));
    vertexArray[i+2] = 0;
}
5
  • 4
    I think this may fix the OP's problem for the most part, but you're still computing the points of a new object on each frame. Due to precision limitations of a GLfloat, over time, the shape won't be its original shape anymore. Rather than changing the original object's definition, the solution should perform a full rotation from its original definition to its "current location" on each frame, never changing the original object's definition. Jan 10, 2013 at 21:09
  • So the best way is to transform using vertex shaders, once it does not modify the original vertex array, right?
    – user1697973
    Jan 11, 2013 at 14:01
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    @Lucaswrk: I am no OpenGL expert, so don't take my words too seriously, but I think a vertex shader is not needed. Simply you should keep the original definition somewhere, without ever changing it, and compute the actual state always based on that definition by applying some transformation to it. each time you can update the transformation data (i.e. the overall rotation angle wrt to the original definition) and obtain the new state, but you never overwrite the original state. this way you avoid accumulating floating point arithmetic imprecision.
    – Andy Prowl
    Jan 11, 2013 at 14:33
  • Thank you for the answer. But on a large project/game (excluding the use of an 3d engine), which has a lot of geometry, each one with a different vertex shader, storing an original state + transformed state can become expensive, no?
    – user1697973
    Jan 11, 2013 at 14:50
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    i guess it can be memory consuming, but this way you gain precision and avoid deformations. i believe 3d engines actually work this way: you define a mesh for each object with fixed coordinates, then at each frame you only update a transformation (normally consisting of a 4x4 matrix) for each object and provide the transformation to the framework. behind the scenes, the framework will apply/combine the transformations to the original definition and obtain new vertices to be displayed. there are probably several optimizations being done, but I would say at least conceptually it works this way
    – Andy Prowl
    Jan 11, 2013 at 15:03

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