19

What is the simplest function to return the smallest power of 2 that is greater than or equal to a given non-negative integer in Python?

For example, the smallest power of 2 greater than or equal to 6 is 8.

32

Let's test it:

import collections
import math
import timeit

def power_bit_length(x):
    return 2**(x-1).bit_length()

def shift_bit_length(x):
    return 1<<(x-1).bit_length()

def power_log(x):
    return 2**(math.ceil(math.log(x, 2)))

def test(f):
    collections.deque((f(i) for i in range(1, 1000001)), maxlen=0)

def timetest(f):
    print('{}: {}'.format(timeit.timeit(lambda: test(f), number=10),
                          f.__name__))

timetest(power_bit_length)
timetest(shift_bit_length)
timetest(power_log)

The reason I'm using range(1, 1000001) instead of just range(1000000) is that the power_log version will fail on 0. The reason I'm using a small number of reps over a largeish range instead of lots of reps over a small range is because I expect that different versions will have different performance over different domains. (If you expect to be calling this with huge thousand-bit numbers, of course, you want a test that uses those.)

With Apple Python 2.7.2:

4.38817000389: power_bit_length
3.69475698471: shift_bit_length
7.91623902321: power_log

With Python.org Python 3.3.0:

6.566169916652143: power_bit_length
3.098236607853323: shift_bit_length
9.982460380066186: power_log

With pypy 1.9.0/2.7.2:

2.8580930233: power_bit_length
2.49524712563: shift_bit_length
3.4371240139: power_log

I believe this demonstrates that the 2** is the slow part here; using bit_length instead of log does speed things up, but using 1<< instead of 2** is more important.

Also, I think it's clearer. The OP's version requires you to make a mental context-switch from logarithms to bits, and then back to exponents. Either stay in bits the whole time (shift_bit_length), or stay in logs and exponents (power_log).

  • 4
    Please note that the result is incorrect for x == 0, since (-1).bit_length() == 1 in Python. – Siu Ching Pong -Asuka Kenji- Mar 16 '15 at 18:35
  • Take care about accuracy. math.log(2**29,2) is 29.000000000000004 so power_log(2**29) gives an incorrect answer of 30. – Colonel Panic May 2 '17 at 13:02
  • 1
    @ColonelPanic The problem you noted is non-existent if math.log2 is used, as it rightfully should be. The problem exists starting at 29 only if math.log is used. – A-B-B Feb 11 '18 at 21:36
15

Always returning 2**(x - 1).bit_length() is incorrect because although it returns 1 for x=1, it returns a non-monotonic 2 for x=0. A simple fix that is monotonically safe for x=0 is:

def next_power_of_2(x):  
    return 1 if x == 0 else 2**(x - 1).bit_length()

Sample outputs:

>>> print(', '.join(f'{x}:{next_power_of_2(x)}' for x in range(10)))
0:1, 1:1, 2:2, 3:4, 4:4, 5:8, 6:8, 7:8, 8:8, 9:16

It can pedantically be argued that x=0 should return 0 (and not 1), since 2**float('-inf') == 0.

  • 1
    Isn't that awfully slow for large x? Apart from that, I can't say I understand it. – user395760 Jan 10 '13 at 21:28
  • @delnan -- Why would you expect this to be slow? (not that I understand the code either ...) – mgilson Jan 10 '13 at 21:33
  • @delnan: First, bit_length is effectively log base 2 rounded up - 1, and very quickly. So, raise 2 to the power of that, and you're done. Maybe doing 1 << instead of 2 ** would be faster, but otherwise, what slowness are you expecting here? – abarnert Jan 10 '13 at 21:34
  • 2
    Nevermind, I read this as taking 2 to the x-1th power, then taking the bit_length of that. It's actually the other way around. With that, the intermediate integer would get quite large quickly, but this way it's more reasonable. Still not what I'd call intuitive. – user395760 Jan 10 '13 at 21:37
  • 2
    Oh wow, no. I think dot binds tighter than **. – jhoyla Jan 10 '13 at 21:38
9

Would this work for you:

import math

def next_power_of_2(x):
    return 1 if x == 0 else 2**math.ceil(math.log2(x))

Note that math.log2 is available in Python 3 but not in Python 2. Using it instead of math.log avoids numerical problems with the latter at 2**29 and beyond.

Sample outputs:

>>> print(', '.join(f'{x}:{next_power_of_2(x)}' for x in range(10)))
0:1, 1:1, 2:2, 3:4, 4:4, 5:8, 6:8, 7:8, 8:8, 9:16

It can pedantically be argued that x=0 should return 0 (and not 1), since 2**float('-inf') == 0.

  • Requires log, which I think is slower. – jhoyla Jan 10 '13 at 21:35
  • @jhoyla Performance is very rarely relevant (and the slow part would be looking up two functions and calling them, not log specifically). This is definitely more readable and obvious (for me at least). – user395760 Jan 10 '13 at 21:40
  • The only way to find out if it's slower is to test… but it does have the disadvantage that it says next_power_of_two(0) is a DomainError instead of 1… – abarnert Jan 10 '13 at 21:40
  • 2
    The bit_length method gives 2 for 0, which is also wrong :P. – jhoyla Jan 10 '13 at 21:48
  • 1
    @jhoyla: Oh, good point. There's an easy fix for each version, but I'm not sure which one looks clearer once fixed… (Also, it's arguable that next_power_of_two(0) should be 0, not 1, because 0 is the -infth power, and therefore also the -inf+1th… But either way, 2 is clearly wrong.) – abarnert Jan 10 '13 at 21:50
2

We can do this as follows using bit manipulation:

def next_power_of_2(n):
    if n == 0:
        return 1
    if n & (n - 1) == 0:
        return n
    while n & (n - 1) > 0:
        n &= (n - 1)
    return n << 1

Sample outputs:

>>> print(', '.join(f'{x}:{next_power_of_2(x)}' for x in range(10)))
0:1, 1:1, 2:2, 3:4, 4:4, 5:8, 6:8, 7:8, 8:8, 9:16

For further reading, refer to this resource.

1
v+=(v==0);
v--;
v|=v>>1;
v|=v>>2;
v|=v>>4;
v|=v>>8;
v|=v>>16;
v++;

For a 16-bit integer.

  • 1
    bit-twiddling hacks are great but please cite sources – Jason S Dec 9 '16 at 21:23

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