381

What is the difference between the && and and operators in Ruby?

1

9 Answers 9

404

and is the same as && but with lower precedence. They both use short-circuit evaluation.

WARNING: and even has lower precedence than = so you'll usually want to avoid and. An example when and should be used can be found in the Rails Guide under "Avoiding Double Render Errors".

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  • 63
    It would be a good idea to specify that one should usually use &&, while and should be used for very specific cases only. Commented Apr 9, 2012 at 3:05
  • 23
    From Andrew Marshall's link: "Another way of thinking about and is as a reversed if statement modifier: next if widget = widgets.pop becomes widget = widgets.pop and next. That's a great way of putting it, really made it "click" in my head. (And or is like a reversed unless modifier.)
    – GMA
    Commented Oct 29, 2013 at 7:31
  • 1
    Combine this answer with the details of tadman's answer and you get the whole picture.
    – sargas
    Commented Apr 30, 2014 at 22:14
  • 1
    because of the lower precedence, evaluations such as x = true and false makes x equal to true and x = false or true makes x equal to false
    – Eiiki
    Commented Jul 8, 2015 at 21:56
  • 1
    Updated link from Avdi: avdi.codes/… Commented Jul 21, 2020 at 11:44
260

The practical difference is binding strength, which can lead to peculiar behavior if you're not prepared for it:

foo = :foo
bar = nil

a = foo and bar
# => nil
a
# => :foo

a = foo && bar
# => nil
a
# => nil

a = (foo and bar)
# => nil
a
# => nil

(a = foo) && bar
# => nil
a
# => :foo

The same thing works for || and or.

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  • 2
    a = foo and bar and (a = foo ) && bar proves that and has lower precedence than &&.
    – sargas
    Commented Apr 30, 2014 at 22:15
  • i don't get it: what is "foo and bar" meant to return?
    – BenKoshy
    Commented Apr 26, 2016 at 6:08
  • a = foo and bar is equivalent to (a = :foo) and nil. Since the assignment returns a logically true value (:foo) then the second part evaluates, which fails, returning nil.
    – tadman
    Commented Apr 26, 2016 at 7:31
67

The Ruby Style Guide says it better than I could:

Use &&/|| for boolean expressions, and/or for control flow. (Rule of thumb: If you have to use outer parentheses, you are using the wrong operators.)

# boolean expression
if some_condition && some_other_condition
  do_something
end

# control flow
document.saved? or document.save!
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  • 57
    Actually the guide now says to avoid and/or completely, and they might have a point. Often their usage in control flow could be more obviously written with if/unless operators anyway (e.g. document.save! unless document.saved?)
    – Yarin
    Commented Sep 14, 2013 at 12:08
  • 1
    @akostadinov in case you weren't trolling: the Ruby Style guide isn't written by the creators of Ruby. Ruby was created by Yukihiro Matsumoto and others, while the Ruby Style Guide was mainly by Bozhidar Batsov. Commented Jul 3, 2014 at 23:03
  • 2
    @AndrewGrimm, thanks, good to know. Sorry for trolling but I'm sincerely confused with some aspects of ruby reality. One thing is sure - every ruby project needs strict style policies to keep the codebase maintainable. Commented Jul 4, 2014 at 7:59
42

|| and && bind with the precedence that you expect from boolean operators in programming languages (&& is very strong, || is slightly less strong).

and and or have lower precedence.

For example, unlike ||, or has lower precedence than =:

> a = false || true
 => true 
> a
 => true 
> a = false or true
 => true 
> a
 => false

Likewise, unlike &&, and also has lower precedence than =:

> a = true && false
 => false 
> a
 => false 
> a = true and false
 => false 
> a
 => true 

What's more, unlike && and ||, and and or bind with equal precedence:

> !puts(1) || !puts(2) && !puts(3)
1
 => true
> !puts(1) or !puts(2) and !puts(3)
1
3
 => true 
> !puts(1) or (!puts(2) and !puts(3))
1
 => true

The weakly-binding and and or may be useful for control-flow purposes: see http://devblog.avdi.org/2010/08/02/using-and-and-or-in-ruby/ .

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  • 2
    "unlike ||, or has lower precedence than =" ...now it makes more sense, thanks! Commented Feb 20, 2014 at 0:16
22

and has lower precedence than &&.

But for an unassuming user, problems might occur if it is used along with other operators whose precedence are in between, for example, the assignment operator:

def happy?() true; end
def know_it?() true; end

todo = happy? && know_it? ? "Clap your hands" : "Do Nothing"

todo
# => "Clap your hands"

todo = happy? and know_it? ? "Clap your hands" : "Do Nothing"

todo
# => true
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  • 1
    Thank you, but how is the precedence of "and" different from "&&"?
    – BenKoshy
    Commented May 14, 2016 at 9:10
  • 3
    @BKSpurgeon See here for a ordered list of operator precedence in Ruby.
    – thutt
    Commented Jul 27, 2017 at 8:25
5

and has lower precedence, mostly we use it as a control-flow modifier such as if:

next if widget = widgets.pop

becomes

widget = widgets.pop and next

For or:

raise "Not ready!" unless ready_to_rock?

becomes

ready_to_rock? or raise "Not ready!"

I prefer to use if but not and, because if is more intelligible, so I just ignore and and or.

Refer to "Using “and” and “or” in Ruby" for more information.

1

and checks only first condition and gives result on other hand && strongly checks both conditions and gives logical result.

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  • This does not agree with all the other answers.
    – MDickten
    Commented Nov 9, 2023 at 8:44
0

I don't know if this is Ruby intention or if this is a bug but try this code below. This code was run on Ruby version 2.5.1 and was on a Linux system.

puts 1 > -1 and 257 < 256
# => false

puts 1 > -1 && 257 < 256
# => true
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  • 1
    @JakubArnold Sarcasm is never helpful. Examples sometimes are.
    – BobRodes
    Commented Feb 14, 2019 at 4:38
  • @BobRodes It wasn't a sarcasm. There are 7 answers, 6 of which already have examples. Commented Feb 14, 2019 at 9:42
  • 1
    @JakubArnold I still found this example helpful.
    – BobRodes
    Commented Feb 15, 2019 at 6:03
  • I'm getting odd results as well. v1 = true and false p v1 # => app.rb: true, IRB: false v2 = true && false p v2 # => app.rb: false, IRB: false puts 1 > -1 && 257 < 256 # => app.rb: false, IRB: false
    – Rich_F
    Commented Apr 15, 2019 at 9:31
0

For me the behavior of and as opposed to modifier if is preferable if I want to exploit a side effect of the conditional expression - watch the undefined local variable or method 'y' in the first attempt:

km@latika:~$ irb
irb(main):001:0> x=y if (y="hello")
(irb):1: warning: found `= literal' in conditional, should be ==
(irb):1:in `<main>': undefined local variable or method `y' for main:Object (NameError)
        from /usr/lib/ruby/gems/3.1.0/gems/irb-1.4.1/exe/irb:11:in `<top (required)>'
        from /bin/irb:25:in `load'
        from /bin/irb:25:in `<main>'
irb(main):002:0> quit

At this point though y is already assigned, so I restart irb to demonstrate my point with a fresh start:

km@latika:~$ irb
irb(main):001:0> y="hello" and x=y
=> "hello"
irb(main):002:0> quit

In my opinion this is the nicest way to override a variable with something not nil (or false, but that is outside the point). Especially if instead of "hello" we have complicated_calculation().

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