201

I need to do a simple split of a string, but there doesn't seem to be a function for this, and the manual way I tested didn't seem to work. How would I do it?

1

18 Answers 18

154

Here is my really simple solution. Use the gmatch function to capture strings which contain at least one character of anything other than the desired separator. The separator is **any* whitespace (%s in Lua) by default:

function mysplit (inputstr, sep)
        if sep == nil then
                sep = "%s"
        end
        local t={}
        for str in string.gmatch(inputstr, "([^"..sep.."]+)") do
                table.insert(t, str)
        end
        return t
end

.

9
  • 1
    Thanks. Just what I was looking for.
    – Nicholas
    Jun 3, 2012 at 19:33
  • 5
    Wow, the first answer in this whole question that actually has a function that returns a table. Note though, that t and i need the "local" modifier, as it is you're overwriting globals. :)
    – cib
    Apr 18, 2013 at 18:05
  • 4
    As others have pointed out, you can simplify this by using table.insert(t,str) instead of t[i] = str and then you don't need i=1 or i = i +1 Apr 21, 2015 at 0:27
  • 5
    Doesn't work if string contains empty values, eg. 'foo,,bar'. You get {'foo','bar'} instead of {'foo', '', 'bar'}
    – andras
    Sep 19, 2016 at 21:38
  • 9
    That's right. The next version will work in that case: function split(inputstr, sep) sep=sep or '%s' local t={} for field,s in string.gmatch(inputstr, "([^"..sep.."]*)("..sep.."?)") do table.insert(t,field) if s=="" then return t end end end
    – bart
    Apr 6, 2017 at 23:06
41

If you are splitting a string in Lua, you should try the string.gmatch() or string.sub() methods. Use the string.sub() method if you know the index you wish to split the string at, or use the string.gmatch() if you will parse the string to find the location to split the string at.

Example using string.gmatch() from Lua 5.1 Reference Manual:

 t = {}
 s = "from=world, to=Lua"
 for k, v in string.gmatch(s, "(%w+)=(%w+)") do
   t[k] = v
 end
1
  • I "borrowed" an implementation from that lua-users page thanks anyway
    – RCIX
    Sep 15, 2009 at 16:56
30

If you just want to iterate over the tokens, this is pretty neat:

line = "one, two and 3!"

for token in string.gmatch(line, "[^%s]+") do
   print(token)
end

Output:

one,

two

and

3!

Short explanation: the "[^%s]+" pattern matches to every non-empty string in between space characters.

1
  • 4
    The pattern %S is equal to the one you mentioned, as %S is the negation of %s, like %D is the negation of %d. Additionally, %w is equal to [A-Za-z0-9_] (other characters might be supported depending on your locale). Jan 2, 2014 at 22:00
23

If you program in Lua, you are out of luck here. Lua is THE one programming language that just happens to be notoriously infamous because its authors never implemented "the" split function in the standard library, and instead wrote 16 screenfulls of explanations and lame excuses as to why they didn't and wouldn't, interspersed with numerous half-working examples that are virtually guaranteed to work for almost everyone but break in your corner case. This is just Lua state of the art, and everyone who programs in Lua simply ends up clenching their teeth and iterating over characters. There are lots of solutions in existence that are sometimes better, but exactly zero solutions that are reliably better.

13
  • "There are lots of solutions in existence that are sometimes better, but exactly zero solutions that are reliably better." Then write one that's reliably better. If the authors could write one, so can you. If you can't write one that serves everyone's needs, then you understand why its not in Lua. Lua was designed to be a configuration/extension language for a host application, with the host providing a domain specific library. The standard library is optional and deliberately minimal, mostly a thin wrapper over some ANSI C libraries.
    – Mud
    Jan 26 at 23:27
  • 7
    @Mud You miss the point. Every algorithm can be implemented in a Turing complete language, so ANYONE CAN just port JS's split() or PHP's explode() or whatever. But with Lua authors refusing to standardize ONE solution for Lua, EVERYONE HAS TO. And that's thousands upon thousands of programmer-hours accumulating over decades. And ONLY LUA AUTHORS can standardize a solution! Jan 27 at 0:11
  • You said there are "exactly zero solutions that are reliably better [than] clenching your teeth and iterating over characters". Now you're either saying split() or PHP's explode() are reliably better, or recommending something unreliable. "that's thousands upon thousands of programmer-hours accumulating over decades" That's true of any language that doesn't have a "kitchen sink included" library, including ANSI C, the most popular language on Earth, and the basis for Lua's deliberately minimal library. It's basically an argument that no language should not include a massive library.
    – Mud
    Jan 27 at 20:17
  • 1
    With a standardized split function: "94% of the time it works for me. 6% of the time it doesn't, but I learn quickly once and for all which cases are bad cases, and 99.99999% of the time 100 other people have hit that same corner case, it's a known problem with known API, and there's a consensus solution". Without a standardized split function: "Google how to split strings in Lua. Try answer 1 from SO. Fine. A month later, a corner case. You wrote it yourself? Or used that SO answer? The original 2019 answer or later edits? Or commment#392309 by a user with 2-digit reputation?" Jan 27 at 22:12
  • 4
    I thought this answer was a bit harsh and trolling, but it's true actually. For readers interested by the "16 screenfulls of explanations (…)": Split Join. Feb 23 at 14:18
16

Just as string.gmatch will find patterns in a string, this function will find the things between patterns:

function string:split(pat)
  pat = pat or '%s+'
  local st, g = 1, self:gmatch("()("..pat..")")
  local function getter(segs, seps, sep, cap1, ...)
    st = sep and seps + #sep
    return self:sub(segs, (seps or 0) - 1), cap1 or sep, ...
  end
  return function() if st then return getter(st, g()) end end
end

By default it returns whatever is separated by whitespace.

1
  • 7
    +1. Note to any other Lua beginners: this returns an iterator, and 'between patterns' includes the beginning and end of the string. (As a newbie I had to try it to figure these things out.) Jul 11, 2010 at 23:26
13

Here is the function:

function split(pString, pPattern)
   local Table = {}  -- NOTE: use {n = 0} in Lua-5.0
   local fpat = "(.-)" .. pPattern
   local last_end = 1
   local s, e, cap = pString:find(fpat, 1)
   while s do
      if s ~= 1 or cap ~= "" then
     table.insert(Table,cap)
      end
      last_end = e+1
      s, e, cap = pString:find(fpat, last_end)
   end
   if last_end <= #pString then
      cap = pString:sub(last_end)
      table.insert(Table, cap)
   end
   return Table
end

Call it like:

list=split(string_to_split,pattern_to_match)

e.g.:

list=split("1:2:3:4","\:")


For more go here:
http://lua-users.org/wiki/SplitJoin

9

Because there are more than one way to skin a cat, here's my approach:

Code:

#!/usr/bin/env lua

local content = [=[
Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit,
sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna 
aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation 
ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat.
]=]

local function split(str, sep)
   local result = {}
   local regex = ("([^%s]+)"):format(sep)
   for each in str:gmatch(regex) do
      table.insert(result, each)
   end
   return result
end

local lines = split(content, "\n")
for _,line in ipairs(lines) do
   print(line)
end

Output: Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipisicing elit, sed do eiusmod tempor incididunt ut labore et dolore magna aliqua. Ut enim ad minim veniam, quis nostrud exercitation ullamco laboris nisi ut aliquip ex ea commodo consequat.

Explanation:

The gmatch function works as an iterator, it fetches all the strings that match regex. The regex takes all characters until it finds a separator.

7

I like this short solution

function split(s, delimiter)
    result = {};
    for match in (s..delimiter):gmatch("(.-)"..delimiter) do
        table.insert(result, match);
    end
    return result;
end
2
  • This is my favorite, since it's so short and simple. I don't quite understand what happens, could someone explain to me?
    – hexagonest
    Nov 24, 2013 at 4:04
  • 3
    This fails when using dot as delimiter (or potentially any other pattern magic character)
    – TurboHz
    Apr 16, 2014 at 11:39
7

A lot of these answers only accept single-character separators, or don't deal with edge cases well (e.g. empty separators), so I thought I would provide a more definitive solution.

Here are two functions, gsplit and split, adapted from the code in the Scribunto MediaWiki extension, which is used on wikis like Wikipedia. The code is licenced under the GPL v2. I have changed the variable names and added comments to make the code a bit easier to understand, and I have also changed the code to use regular Lua string patterns instead of Scribunto's patterns for Unicode strings. The original code has test cases here.

-- gsplit: iterate over substrings in a string separated by a pattern
-- 
-- Parameters:
-- text (string)    - the string to iterate over
-- pattern (string) - the separator pattern
-- plain (boolean)  - if true (or truthy), pattern is interpreted as a plain
--                    string, not a Lua pattern
-- 
-- Returns: iterator
--
-- Usage:
-- for substr in gsplit(text, pattern, plain) do
--   doSomething(substr)
-- end
local function gsplit(text, pattern, plain)
  local splitStart, length = 1, #text
  return function ()
    if splitStart then
      local sepStart, sepEnd = string.find(text, pattern, splitStart, plain)
      local ret
      if not sepStart then
        ret = string.sub(text, splitStart)
        splitStart = nil
      elseif sepEnd < sepStart then
        -- Empty separator!
        ret = string.sub(text, splitStart, sepStart)
        if sepStart < length then
          splitStart = sepStart + 1
        else
          splitStart = nil
        end
      else
        ret = sepStart > splitStart and string.sub(text, splitStart, sepStart - 1) or ''
        splitStart = sepEnd + 1
      end
      return ret
    end
  end
end

-- split: split a string into substrings separated by a pattern.
-- 
-- Parameters:
-- text (string)    - the string to iterate over
-- pattern (string) - the separator pattern
-- plain (boolean)  - if true (or truthy), pattern is interpreted as a plain
--                    string, not a Lua pattern
-- 
-- Returns: table (a sequence table containing the substrings)
local function split(text, pattern, plain)
  local ret = {}
  for match in gsplit(text, pattern, plain) do
    table.insert(ret, match)
  end
  return ret
end

Some examples of the split function in use:

local function printSequence(t)
  print(unpack(t))
end

printSequence(split('foo, bar,baz', ',%s*'))       -- foo     bar     baz
printSequence(split('foo, bar,baz', ',%s*', true)) -- foo, bar,baz
printSequence(split('foo', ''))                    -- f       o       o
6

You can use this method:

function string:split(delimiter)
  local result = { }
  local from  = 1
  local delim_from, delim_to = string.find( self, delimiter, from  )
  while delim_from do
    table.insert( result, string.sub( self, from , delim_from-1 ) )
    from  = delim_to + 1
    delim_from, delim_to = string.find( self, delimiter, from  )
  end
  table.insert( result, string.sub( self, from  ) )
  return result
end

delimiter = string.split(stringtodelimite,pattern) 
5

a way not seen in others

function str_split(str, sep)
    if sep == nil then
        sep = '%s'
    end 

    local res = {}
    local func = function(w)
        table.insert(res, w)
    end 

    string.gsub(str, '[^'..sep..']+', func)
    return res 
end
1
  • This is a dupe of the answer with the most votes, that was written in 2011. Aug 3 at 19:00
5

You could use penlight library. This has a function for splitting string using delimiter which outputs list.

It has implemented many of the function that we may need while programming and missing in Lua.

Here is the sample for using it.

> 
> stringx = require "pl.stringx"
> 
> str = "welcome to the world of lua"
> 
> arr = stringx.split(str, " ")
> 
> arr
{welcome,to,the,world,of,lua}
> 
4

Simply sitting on a delimiter

local str = 'one,two'
local regxEverythingExceptComma = '([^,]+)'
for x in string.gmatch(str, regxEverythingExceptComma) do
    print(x)
end
3

I used the above examples to craft my own function. But the missing piece for me was automatically escaping magic characters.

Here is my contribution:

function split(text, delim)
    -- returns an array of fields based on text and delimiter (one character only)
    local result = {}
    local magic = "().%+-*?[]^$"

    if delim == nil then
        delim = "%s"
    elseif string.find(delim, magic, 1, true) then
        -- escape magic
        delim = "%"..delim
    end

    local pattern = "[^"..delim.."]+"
    for w in string.gmatch(text, pattern) do
        table.insert(result, w)
    end
    return result
end
2
  • This was my big issue too. This works great with magic characters, nice one Jun 3, 2016 at 6:08
  • might be stupid, but what are 'magic characters'?
    – Ismoh
    Apr 15 at 22:53
3

Super late to this question, but in case anyone wants a version that handles the amount of splits you want to get.....

-- Split a string into a table using a delimiter and a limit
string.split = function(str, pat, limit)
  local t = {}
  local fpat = "(.-)" .. pat
  local last_end = 1
  local s, e, cap = str:find(fpat, 1)
  while s do
    if s ~= 1 or cap ~= "" then
      table.insert(t, cap)
    end

    last_end = e+1
    s, e, cap = str:find(fpat, last_end)

    if limit ~= nil and limit <= #t then
      break
    end
  end

  if last_end <= #str then
    cap = str:sub(last_end)
    table.insert(t, cap)
  end

  return t
end

0

I found that many of the other answers had edge cases which failed (eg. when given string contains #, { or } characters, or when given a delimiter character like % which require escaping). Here is the implementation that I went with instead:

local function newsplit(delimiter, str)
    assert(type(delimiter) == "string")
    assert(#delimiter > 0, "Must provide non empty delimiter")

    -- Add escape characters if delimiter requires it
    delimiter = delimiter:gsub("[%(%)%.%%%+%-%*%?%[%]%^%$]", "%%%0")

    local start_index = 1
    local result = {}

    while true do
       local delimiter_index, _ = str:find(delimiter, start_index)

       if delimiter_index == nil then
          table.insert(result, str:sub(start_index))
          break
       end

       table.insert(result, str:sub(start_index, delimiter_index - 1))

       start_index = delimiter_index + 1
    end

    return result
end
-1

Here is a routine that works in Lua 4.0, returning a table t of the substrings in inputstr delimited by sep:

function string_split(inputstr, sep)
    local inputstr = inputstr .. sep
    local idx, inc, t = 0, 1, {}
    local idx_prev, substr
    repeat 
        idx_prev = idx
        inputstr = strsub(inputstr, idx + 1, -1)    -- chop off the beginning of the string containing the match last found by strfind (or initially, nothing); keep the rest (or initially, all)
        idx = strfind(inputstr, sep)                -- find the 0-based r_index of the first occurrence of separator 
        if idx == nil then break end                -- quit if nothing's found
        substr = strsub(inputstr, 0, idx)           -- extract the substring occurring before the separator (i.e., data field before the next delimiter)
        substr = gsub(substr, "[%c" .. sep .. " ]", "") -- eliminate control characters, separator and spaces
        t[inc] = substr             -- store the substring (i.e., data field)
        inc = inc + 1               -- iterate to next
    until idx == nil
    return t
end

This simple test

inputstr = "the brown lazy fox jumped over the fat grey hen ... or something."
sep = " " 
t = {}
t = string_split(inputstr,sep)
for i=1,15 do
    print(i, t[i])
end

Yields:

--> t[1]=the
--> t[2]=brown
--> t[3]=lazy
--> t[4]=fox
--> t[5]=jumped
--> t[6]=over
--> t[7]=the
--> t[8]=fat
--> t[9]=grey
--> t[10]=hen
--> t[11]=...
--> t[12]=or
--> t[13]=something.
-2

Depending on the use case, this could be useful. It cuts all text either side of the flags:

b = "This is a string used for testing"

--Removes unwanted text
c = (b:match("a([^/]+)used"))

print (c)

Output:

string
1
  • 1
    I dont see any relation to the question.
    – Ismoh
    Apr 15 at 22:50

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