Suppose these code compiled in g++:

#include <stdlib.h>

int main() {
    int a =0;

    goto exit;

    int *b = NULL;

exit:
    return 0;
}

g++ will throw errors:

goto_test.c:10:1: error: jump to label ‘exit’ [-fpermissive]
goto_test.c:6:10: error:   from here [-fpermissive]
goto_test.c:8:10: error:   crosses initialization of ‘int* b’

It seems like that the goto can not cross pointer definition, but gcc compiles them ok, nothing complained.

After fixed the error, we must declare all the pointers before any of the goto statement, that is to say you must declare these pointers even though you do not need them at the present (and violation with some principles).

What the origin design consideration that g++ forbidden the useful tail-goto statement?


Update:

goto can cross variable (any type of variable, not limited to pointer) declaration, but except those that got a initialize value. If we remove the NULL assignment above, g++ keep silent now. So if you want to declare variables that between goto-cross-area, do not initialize them (and still violate some principles).

up vote 30 down vote accepted

Goto can't skip over definitions of variables, because those variables would not exist after the jump, since lifetime of variable starts at the point of definition. The specification does not seem to explicitly mention goto must not do that, but it is implied in what is said about variable lifetime.

Since the error mentions [-fpermissive], you can turn it to warning by specifying that compiler flag. This indicates two things. That it used to be allowed (the variable would exist, but be uninitialized after the jump) and that gcc developers believe the specification wording implies this is forbidden (or implies it's undefined behaviour which they chose to forbid because they can).

The compiler only checks whether the variable formally exists, not whether it's used, otherwise the results would be rather inconsistent. But if you don't need the variable anymore, you can end it's lifetime yourself, making the "tail-goto" viable:

int main() {
    int a =0;
    goto exit;
    {
        int *b = NULL;
    }
exit:
    return 0;
}

is perfectly valid.

On a side-note you are compiling with g++, but as long as the file has extension .c, it's considered C and not C++. gcc and g++ differ in some default flags, mainly for linker phase, but they both compile any installed language (C, C++, ObjC, ObjC++) as determined by the extension.

There is an easy work-around for those primitive types like int:

 // ---  original form, subject to cross initialization error.  ---
 // int foo = 0;

 // ---  work-around form: no more cross initialization error.  ---
 int foo;  foo = 0;

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