15

I have tried to return the array name as shown below. Basically I am trying to make the function test return an array that can be used in main. Could you advise me as to what I need to read into more to find out how to perform a function like this?

#include <stdio.h>

int test(int size, int x){
    int factorFunction[size];    
    factorFunction[0] = 5 + x;
    factorFunction[1] = 7 + x;
    factorFunction[2] = 9 + x;
    return factorFunction;
}

int main(void){
    int factors[2];
    factors = test(2, 3);
    printf("%d", factors[1]);
    return 0;
}

I receive the compiler errors:

smallestMultiple.c:8: warning: return makes integer from pointer without a cast
smallestMultiple.c:8: warning: function returns address of local variable
smallestMultiple.c: In function ‘main’:
smallestMultiple.c:13: error: incompatible types in assignment
  • lots of great answers already. Just a quick note from me: remember that: factorFunction refers to "the address of the first (or 0th) element of your array." It is equivalent to &factorFunction[0] which translates to "the address of the 0th element." – wpp Jan 12 '13 at 22:33
  • Hi Thanks for the comment! I understand this, I just intended to refer 1 to an actual number 1. Is it considered bad practice to disregard the 0th index? – user1530249 Jan 12 '13 at 23:04
  • you should not disregard the 0th element! It takes some getting used to, but is essential (even for higher level languages like ruby). – wpp Jan 13 '13 at 11:58

12 Answers 12

13

You can return an array by returning a pointer (arrays decays to pointers). However, that would be bad in your case, as then you would be returning a pointer to a local variable, and that results in undefined behaviour. This is because the memory the returned pointer points to is no longer valid after the function returns, as the stack space is now reused by other functions.

What you should do is to pass the array and its size both as arguments to the function.

You also have another problem in your code, and that is you use an array of size two, but write to a third element.

13

Functions can't return arrays in C.

However, they can return structs. And structs can contain arrays...

  • You can return array in C by using pointer return type function. – Mohd Shibli Jan 1 '18 at 2:34
  • @MohdShibli - You can, but type-wise that's not quite the same. And returning a pointer to (say) a local array would result in UB, so one has to workaround that.. – Oliver Charlesworth Jan 1 '18 at 10:05
  • local array problem can be easily solved by making the local array static. – Mohd Shibli Jan 2 '18 at 2:07
  • @MohdShibli - that's not really a solution in most cases. Statics are singletons, which means you can't continue to use the result of the first function call once you've called it a second time. – Oliver Charlesworth Jan 2 '18 at 12:17
9

You will need to allocate memory on the heap and return a pointer. C cannot return arrays from functions.

int* test(int size, int x)
{
    int* factorFunction = malloc(sizeof(int) * size);    
    factorFunction[0] = 5 + x;
    factorFunction[1] = 7 + x;
    factorFunction[2] = 9 + x;
    return factorFunction;
}
  • This is not the same. arrays are contiguous memory blocks on the stack which guarantee space locality. malloc not only does not guarantee space locality(one malloc may be far from any other malloc), but also can fail if you don't have enough memory. Hence it is not the answer to this specific question but rather another way of returning a plural from a function, but that is not the question. – Dmitry Aug 27 '16 at 17:26
3

The first line of the error messages means exactly what it says: you've declared the function as returning an int, yet you try to return a pointer.
The bigger problem (as the second line of the error messages tells you) is that the array you're trying to return a pointer to is a local array, and will therefore go out of scope when the functions returns and no longer be valid.
What you ought to do is dynamically allocate an array (i.e. a chunk of continuous memory) using malloc or new and return a pointer to it. And of course make sure you free the memory once you're done with it.

2

Unfortunately C does not support return of arbitrary arrays nor anonymous structs from functions, but there two workarounds.

The first workaround is to create a struct containing the array in it. It's going to have the same size as the array, be allocated on the stack ensuring space locality.

e.g.

typedef struct {
    int arr[5];
} my_array1;

typedef struct {
    int values[3];
} factorFunctionReturnType_t;

The second workaround is to invent a static memory pool(e.g. array with custom malloc/free for this array only), and this will effectively allow you to dynamically allocate memory from this pool, again, effectively returning a pointer to contiguous stack space, which is by definition an array.

e.g.

#include <stdint.h>
static uint8_t static_pool[2048];

Then implement my_alloc, my_free that manage this specific memory pool, again ensuring that the memory created is on the stack, and the memory is already owned by your application apriori(whereas malloc might allocate memory previously not accessible by application or crash if not enough memory and didn't check for fail return).

The third workaround is to have the function return a local variable to a callback function; this ensures that once the function finishes, you can use the result without corrupting the stack because the function using the memory will be sitting above the scope that contains the stack.

#include <stdint.h>
#include <stdio.h>

void returnsAnArray(void (*accept)(void *)) {
    char result[] = "Hello, World!";    

    accept(result);
}

void on_accept(void *result) {
    puts((char *)result);
}

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
    returnsAnArray(on_accept);

    return 0;
}

This is more efficient than a non-stacklike memory pool which needs to make decisions to avoid fragmentation, more efficient than a stacklike memory pool which just puts the result on top of the stack because it doesn't need to copy the string, and more threadsafe because the return value of the function doesn't risk being overwritten by another thread(unless a lock is used).

The funny thing is that all "functional programming paradigm" programs end up emphasizing that you can write C programs without any malloc by chaining callback functions, effectively allocating on the stack.

This has an interesting side effect of making linked lists no longer cache hostile(since callback linked lists allocated on the stack are all going to be near each other on the stack, which lets you do things like runtime string manipulation without any mallocs, and lets you built up unknown sized user inputs without doing any mallocs.

1

C does not advocate to return the address of a local variable to outside of the function, so you would have to define the local variable as static variable.

#include <stdio.h>

/* function to generate and return random numbers */
int * getRandom( ) {

   static int  r[10];
   int i;

   /* set the seed */
   srand( (unsigned)time( NULL ) );

   for ( i = 0; i < 10; ++i) {
      r[i] = rand();
      printf( "r[%d] = %d\n", i, r[i]);
   }

   return r;
}

/* main function to call above defined function */
int main () {

   /* a pointer to an int */
   int *p;
   int i;

   p = getRandom();

   for ( i = 0; i < 10; i++ ) {
      printf( "*(p + %d) : %d\n", i, *(p + i));
   }

   return 0;
}
0

My suggestion would be to pass in an array to fill in:

void test(int size, int factors[], int x){
    factorFunction[0] = 5 + x;
    factorFunction[1] = 7 + x;
    factorFunction[2] = 9 + x;
}

int main(void){
    int factors[3];
    test(3, factors, 3);
    printf("%d", factors[1]);
    return 0;
}

With this method, you don't have to worry about allocating, and you don't need to free the array later on.

I also fixed up up the size of the array, so you don't write outside of it with the third element. Remember that C arrays are declared with "how many you want" and then indexed from 0 ... (how_many-1), so [2] on an array declared with [2] goes outside the array.

0
#include <stdio.h>

#include <stdlib.h>

int* test(int size, int x){
    int *factorFunction = (int *) malloc(sizeof(int) * size);    
    if( factorFunction != NULL ) //makes sure malloc was successful
    {
        factorFunction[0] = 5 + x;
        factorFunction[1] = 7 + x;
        factorFunction[2] = 9 + x; //this line won't work because your array is only 2 ints long

    }
return factorFunction;
}

int main(void){
    int *factors;
    factors = test(2, 3);
    printf("%d", factors[1]);
    //just remember to free the variable back to the heap when you're done
    free(factors);
    return 0;
}

you also might want to make sure that the indexes you are setting actually exist in your array as I've noted above

0

Here is another way to pass back the array:

    int test(){
        static int factorFunction[3];    
        factorFunction[0] = 5 + x;
        factorFunction[1] = 7 + x;
        factorFunction[2] = 9 + x;
        return factorFunction;
    }

The static indicates that the variable will be allocated in a manner that it will remain in memory. So if you have a fixed size for the value and want it to remain in memory between function calls, this is one way to do it.

0

Firstly, you can't return an array from a function in C directly. What you can do is that you can return the address of the array in that function. In that case, the function will look something like this:

int* test(int size, int x){

    /* function body */

    return factorFunction;
}

And to receive the array, you will need a pointer - not an array.

So, instead of using int factors[2]; you have to use int *factors; in your main function.

Secondly, even if you return the address of the array, this code won't work; because you are trying to return the address of a local array; which won't exist after the execution of the function. One easy way to solve this issue is to declare the local array (factorFunction in this case) static.

Considering these two matters, the function test will look like this:

int* test(int size, int x){

    static int factorFunction[size];

    /* function body */

    return factorFunction;
}
0

Firstly, Unless you have C99 which has VLAs, the array size should be constant in C. You can not use the statement below:

int factorFunction[size];

Secondly, you are trying to return an array created in the function which will be deleted out of the scope.

To avoid this, you can take an array as parameter in test function or create an array dynamically with malloc function. Btw your test function can return pointer to updated array.

  • Not sure what std he is using,but C99 have VLA. – Jack Jan 12 '13 at 19:51
  • Whats wrong with int factorFunction[size]? – wpp Jan 12 '13 at 22:42
  • @sytycs Jack is right. We don't know what C standart he is using. I thought that he is using ANSI C because we were expected to write in ANSI C standart at school. As Jack mention variable-length arrays added in C99 standart. – Gökhan Çoban Jan 13 '13 at 2:18
-1

A Very very basic code and very very basic explanation HOW TO Return array back from a user defined function to main function..Hope It helps!! Below I have given complete code to make any one understand how exactly it works? :) :)

#include<iostream>
using namespace std;

int * function_Random()// function with returning pointer type of integer
{
     static int arr[100];
     cout<<"We are Inside FunctionRandom"<<endl;
    for(int i=0;i<100;i++)//loop to add elements in array
    {
        arr[i]=rand();//rand() function to put random numbers generated by system
        cout<<"\t"<<arr[i]; //to show how our array will look
    }
    cout<<endl<<endl;//endl for end line to look well formatted 
    return arr;
}
int main()
{


    int *arrptr; //pointer to get back base address of array
    arrptr=function_Random();//function that returns base address
    cout<<"We are Inside Main"<<endl;
    for(int j=0;j<100;j++)
    {
         cout<<"\t"<<arrptr[j];//returned base address has complete link of array that's why it is able to print the array:contiguous memory locations.
    }       
    return 0;//nothing to return that's why 0
}
  • 1
    Hello again! This code returns the address of a function-local array (return arr;) and has undefined behavior. You deleted one of your other copy/pasted duplicates but you still have two answers with this same incorrect code. – Blastfurnace Jan 29 '15 at 20:22
  • @Blastfurnace where should I correct it? – Ruchir Jan 30 '15 at 7:43
  • The lifetime of the array int arr[100]; is limited to the body of the function where it is defined. When you return arr; you give the caller a dangling pointer to memory that can, and will, be overwritten by other automatic variables. One solution is to allocate memory inside the function using malloc and return that pointer. Of course the caller is then responsible for calling free to release the memory. Or the caller could pass an array to the function for it to fill with data. – Blastfurnace Jan 30 '15 at 14:32
  • edited: added static to fix the main issue – zacheusz Aug 31 '16 at 20:33
  • this is not threadsafe, if that is okay, this function should be (void ()(void)) not (int *()(void)) because it's not returning anything, its only mutating global state. your original version was fine, you just needed to return it via a callback function(which would sit on top of the current scope, and not invalidate the local array). – Dmitry Nov 15 '17 at 3:15

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