In Microsoft SQL Server, I know the query to check if a default constraint exists for a column and drop a default constraint is:

IF EXISTS(SELECT * FROM sysconstraints
  WHERE id=OBJECT_ID('SomeTable')
  AND COL_NAME(id,colid)='ColName'
  AND OBJECTPROPERTY(constid, 'IsDefaultCnst')=1)    
ALTER TABLE SomeTable DROP CONSTRAINT DF_SomeTable_ColName

But due to typo in previous versions of the database, the name of the constraint could be DF_SomeTable_ColName or DF_SmoeTable_ColName.

How can I delete the default constraint without any SQL errors? Default constraint names don't show up in INFORMATION_SCHEMA table, which makes things a bit trickier.

So, something like 'delete the default constraint in this table/column', or 'delete DF_SmoeTable_ColName', but don't give any errors if it can't find it.

  • 1
    I am not proficient with SQL Server, can you rename a constraint after you found out its name? "Alter table sometable rename constraint xxx to yyy" in Oracle. – Juergen Hartelt Sep 16 '09 at 1:29

13 Answers 13

up vote 242 down vote accepted

Expanding on Mitch Wheat's code, the following script will generate the command to drop the constraint and dynamically execute it.

declare @schema_name nvarchar(256)
declare @table_name nvarchar(256)
declare @col_name nvarchar(256)
declare @Command  nvarchar(1000)

set @schema_name = N'MySchema'
set @table_name = N'Department'
set @col_name = N'ModifiedDate'

select @Command = 'ALTER TABLE ' + @schema_name + '.[' + @table_name + '] DROP CONSTRAINT ' + d.name
 from sys.tables t
  join sys.default_constraints d on d.parent_object_id = t.object_id
  join sys.columns c on c.object_id = t.object_id and c.column_id = d.parent_column_id
 where t.name = @table_name
  and t.schema_id = schema_id(@schema_name)
  and c.name = @col_name

--print @Command

execute (@Command)
  • Check stackoverflow.com/a/15786313/2049986 to see a version to drop all contraints for a table – Jacob van Lingen Mar 31 '14 at 10:55
  • I use sys.check_constraints , not sys.default_constraints – Kiquenet Jul 7 '16 at 7:46
  • Not valid if some columns that had multiple default constraints or check constraints created, Only executed for last constraints in query. – Kiquenet Jul 7 '16 at 8:54
  • 2
    This query only addresses default constraints, of which there can only be one per column. Dealing with check constraints is a different problem. – Philip Kelley Jul 7 '16 at 14:12
  • 1
    I've updated this answer to add support for non-default schema names. Hope you don't mind, I can revert and post a separate answer if you like. – Jakub Januszkiewicz Oct 20 '16 at 6:17

Rob Farley's blog post might be of help:

Something like:

 declare @table_name nvarchar(256)
 declare @col_name nvarchar(256)
 set @table_name = N'Department'
 set @col_name = N'ModifiedDate'

 select t.name, c.name, d.name, d.definition
 from 
     sys.tables t
     join sys.default_constraints d on d.parent_object_id = t.object_id
     join sys.columns c on c.object_id = t.object_id
                           and c.column_id = d.parent_column_id
 where 
     t.name = @table_name
     and c.name = @col_name

I found that this works and uses no joins:

DECLARE @ObjectName NVARCHAR(100)
SELECT @ObjectName = OBJECT_NAME([default_object_id]) FROM SYS.COLUMNS
WHERE [object_id] = OBJECT_ID('[tableSchema].[tableName]') AND [name] = 'columnName';
EXEC('ALTER TABLE [tableSchema].[tableName] DROP CONSTRAINT ' + @ObjectName)

Just make sure that columnName does not have brackets around it because the query is looking for an exact match and will return nothing if it is [columnName].

  • 1
    And this answer works with schemas other than the default [dbo], unlike any of the other answers. – Contango Mar 12 '14 at 13:49
  • I haven't tested it, but you can try and add a WHILE (@ObjectName IS NOT NULL) around it, put TOP 1 before SELECT (at)ObjectName = OBJECT_Name([default... and only run the EXEC('ALTER TA... if (at)ObjectName IS NOT NULL. – ScubaSteve May 9 '14 at 13:26
  • 5
    To make this script idempotent add IF @ObjectName IS NOT NULL before EXEC command – Seven Jun 17 '15 at 12:22
  • 3
    Not working for me using CHECK constraints. [default_object_id]) is 0. I get NULL value. – Kiquenet Jul 7 '16 at 8:01
  • Sweet and simple, but according to the microsoft docs this way of doing things will not be around forever. There is a warning indicating that it will be going away in the next version docs.microsoft.com/en-us/sql/t-sql/statements/… – Hopeless Dec 2 '17 at 2:57

To drop constraint for multiple columns:

declare @table_name nvarchar(256)

declare @Command nvarchar(max) = ''

set @table_name = N'ATableName'

select @Command = @Command + 'ALTER TABLE ' + @table_name + ' drop constraint ' + d.name + CHAR(10)+ CHAR(13)
from sys.tables t
join sys.default_constraints d on d.parent_object_id = t.object_id
join sys.columns c on c.object_id = t.object_id
     and c.column_id = d.parent_column_id
where t.name = @table_name and c.name in ('column1','column2','column3')

--print @Command

execute (@Command)

Expanded solution (takes table schema into account):

-- Drop default contstraint for SchemaName.TableName.ColumnName
DECLARE @schema_name NVARCHAR(256)
DECLARE @table_name NVARCHAR(256)
DECLARE @col_name NVARCHAR(256)
DECLARE @Command  NVARCHAR(1000)

set @schema_name = N'SchemaName'
set @table_name = N'TableName'
set @col_name = N'ColumnName'

SELECT @Command = 'ALTER TABLE [' + @schema_name + '].[' + @table_name + '] DROP CONSTRAINT ' + d.name
FROM sys.tables t   
JOIN sys.default_constraints d ON d.parent_object_id = t.object_id  
JOIN sys.schemas s ON s.schema_id = t.schema_id
JOIN sys.columns c ON c.object_id = t.object_id      
     AND c.column_id = d.parent_column_id
WHERE t.name = @table_name
    AND s.name = @schema_name 
    AND c.name = @col_name

EXECUTE (@Command)

Drop all default contstraints in a database - safe for nvarchar(max) threshold.

/* WARNING: THE SAMPLE BELOW; DROPS ALL THE DEFAULT CONSTRAINTS IN A DATABASE */ 
/* MAY 03, 2013 - BY WISEROOT  */
declare @table_name nvarchar(128)
declare @column_name nvarchar(128)
declare @df_name nvarchar(128)
declare @cmd nvarchar(128) 

declare table_names cursor for 
 SELECT t.name TableName, c.name ColumnName
 FROM sys.columns c INNER JOIN
     sys.tables t ON c.object_id = t.object_id INNER JOIN
     sys.schemas s ON t.schema_id = s.schema_id
     ORDER BY T.name, c.name

     open table_names
fetch next from table_names into @table_name , @column_name
while @@fetch_status = 0
BEGIN

if exists (SELECT top(1) d.name from sys.tables t join sys.default_constraints d on d.parent_object_id = t.object_id join sys.columns c on c.object_id = t.object_id and c.column_id = d.parent_column_id where t.name = @table_name and c.name = @column_name)
BEGIN
    SET @df_name = (SELECT top(1) d.name from sys.tables t join sys.default_constraints d on d.parent_object_id = t.object_id join sys.columns c on c.object_id = t.object_id and c.column_id = d.parent_column_id where t.name = @table_name and c.name = @column_name)
    select @cmd = 'ALTER TABLE [' + @table_name +  '] DROP CONSTRAINT [' +  @df_name + ']'
    print @cmd
    EXEC sp_executeSQL @cmd;
END

  fetch next from table_names into @table_name , @column_name
END

close table_names 
deallocate table_names
  • Not valid if some columns that had multiple default constraints or check constraints created, Only executed for top 1 constraints in query. – Kiquenet Jul 7 '16 at 9:10

Following solution will drop specific default constraint of a column from the table

Declare @Const NVARCHAR(256)

SET @Const = (
              SELECT TOP 1 'ALTER TABLE' + YOUR TABLE NAME +' DROP CONSTRAINT '+name
              FROM Sys.default_constraints A
              JOIN sysconstraints B on A.parent_object_id = B.id
              WHERE id = OBJECT_ID('YOUR TABLE NAME')
              AND COL_NAME(id, colid)='COLUMN NAME'
              AND OBJECTPROPERTY(constid,'IsDefaultCnst')=1
            )
 EXEC (@Const)

Run this command to browse all constraints:

exec sp_helpconstraint 'mytable' --and look under constraint_name. 

It will look something like this: DF__Mytable__Column__[ABC123]. Then you can just drop the constraint.

  • Not working for me: exec sp_helpconstraint 'Roles2016.UsersCRM' – Kiquenet Jul 7 '16 at 9:04
  • @Kiquenet Should be only the table name: exec sp_helpconstraint 'Roles2016' – Baked Inhalf Jul 13 '16 at 12:25
  • It is just showing foreign key constaints. not default value constaint – Ronnie Aug 30 '17 at 12:28

I had some columns that had multiple default constraints created, so I create the following stored procedure:

CREATE PROCEDURE [dbo].[RemoveDefaultConstraints] @table_name nvarchar(256), @column_name nvarchar(256)
AS
BEGIN

    DECLARE @ObjectName NVARCHAR(100)

    START: --Start of loop
    SELECT 
        @ObjectName = OBJECT_NAME([default_object_id]) 
    FROM 
        SYS.COLUMNS
    WHERE 
        [object_id] = OBJECT_ID(@table_name) 
        AND [name] = @column_name;

    -- Don't drop the constraint unless it exists
    IF @ObjectName IS NOT NULL
    BEGIN
        EXEC ('ALTER TABLE '+@table_name+' DROP CONSTRAINT ' + @ObjectName)
        GOTO START; --Used to loop in case of multiple default constraints
    END
END
GO

-- How to run the stored proc.  This removes the default constraint(s) for the enabled column on the User table.
EXEC [dbo].[RemoveDefaultConstraints] N'[dbo].[User]', N'enabled'
GO

-- If you hate the proc, just get rid of it
DROP PROCEDURE [dbo].[RemoveDefaultConstraints]
GO

Useful for some columns that had multiple default constraints or check constraints created:

Modified https://stackoverflow.com/a/16359095/206730 script

Note: this script is for sys.check_constraints

declare @table_name nvarchar(128)
declare @column_name nvarchar(128)
declare @constraint_name nvarchar(128)
declare @constraint_definition nvarchar(512)

declare @df_name nvarchar(128)
declare @cmd nvarchar(128) 

PRINT 'DROP CONSTRAINT [Roles2016.UsersCRM].Estado'

declare constraints cursor for 
 select t.name TableName, c.name ColumnName, d.name ConstraintName, d.definition ConstraintDefinition
 from sys.tables t   
 join sys.check_constraints d  on d.parent_object_id = t.object_id  
 join sys.columns c  on c.object_id = t.object_id      
 and c.column_id = d.parent_column_id
 where t.name = N'Roles2016.UsersCRM' and c.name = N'Estado'

open constraints
fetch next from constraints into @table_name , @column_name, @constraint_name, @constraint_definition
while @@fetch_status = 0
BEGIN
    print 'CONSTRAINT: ' + @constraint_name
    select @cmd = 'ALTER TABLE [' + @table_name +  '] DROP CONSTRAINT [' +  @constraint_name + ']'
    print @cmd
    EXEC sp_executeSQL @cmd;

  fetch next from constraints into @table_name , @column_name, @constraint_name, @constraint_definition
END

close constraints 
deallocate constraints

I hope this could be helpful for whom has similar problem . In ObjectExplorer window, select your database=> Tables,=> your table=> Constraints. If the customer is defined on create column time, you can see the default name of constraint including the column name. then use:

ALTER TABLE  yourTableName DROP CONSTRAINT DF__YourTa__NewCo__47127295;

(the constraint name is just an example)

        declare @ery nvarchar(max)
        declare @tab nvarchar(max) = 'myTable'
        declare @qu nvarchar(max) = 'alter table '+@tab+' drop constraint '

        select @ery = (select bj.name from sys.tables as tb 
        inner join sys.objects as bj 
        on tb.object_id = bj.parent_object_id
        where tb.name = @tab and bj.type = 'PK')

        exec(@qu+@ery)

       **Take a look**
  • 1
    Even if your code brings a solution, it is best that you wrap it around a little bit of explanations as to why it solves the question. – Fabien Jul 15 '17 at 2:58

Always generate script and review before you run. Below the script

  select 'Alter table dbo.' + t.name + ' drop constraint '+ d.name  
  from sys.tables t
  join sys.default_constraints d on d.parent_object_id = t.object_id
  join sys.columns c on c.object_id = t.object_id
       and c.column_id = d.parent_column_id
  where c.name in ('VersionEffectiveDate','VersionEndDate','VersionReasonDesc')
  order by t.name

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